https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianSedonja

"Hva driver du med?"

Can somebody explain to me why that sentence translates to "What do you do for a living?" if "for a living" isn't even written and "med" means "with?" Is it some standard phrase or something? Takk!

January 25, 2016

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
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It can mean "What are you doing (right now)?" or "What are you up to (these days)?" or "What do you do (for a living)?". It's all very context dependent.

In English "What are you doing?" and "What do you do?" have different connotations, but since we only have one present tense in Norwegian it makes the question more open to interpretation.

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianSedonja

Thank you. Can you also explain why do you use the word "med" here, because it doesn't make sense to me.

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
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"å drive med" is a verb phrase usually used in relation to some sort of occupation (but not necessarily a job), and needs the preposition to have any of the meanings I listed above. When used as "å drive med X" it can often be translated as "to occupy/busy oneself with X" (note the preposition), or just a straightforward "to work/do X".

"å bedrive" can be used in many of the same contexts, and without any added preposition. However, it's more formal, and less common in speech.

"å drive" on its own is a verb with many definitions, among them "to drift", "to drive (forward)", and "to grow".

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianSedonja

Thanks a lot!

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
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Bare hyggelig! :)

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
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I'm an archaeology student. ;)

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianSedonja

You really know stuff. Are you a teacher?

January 25, 2016
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