"Sioned dw i."

Translation:I am Sioned.

January 26, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bvance.72_lubez

Sioned is actually the Welsh form of the name, "Janet"!

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Samiwise

Diolch!

Yay,I speak Welsh!! :)

July 21, 2016

[deactivated user]

    Is this the emphatic way of saying your name?

    I assume "Rydw i'n Sioned" is acceptable, albeit very formal?

    January 26, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/crishale

    It sounds odd in a way that's hard to describe. It's a bit like if you were to say "Sioned is me". I would expect some sort of description-type thing after "Rydw i'n", like "Rydw i'n gweithio" (I'm working) or "Rydw i'n lawn" (I'm full).

    January 27, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/ElectricHare

    Exactly!

    (You don't need to mutate "llawn" in your example by the way. "Rydw i'n llawn" is correct :-)

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/crishale

    Oh yes, thanks. I did deliberate over that and I don't know why I decided to mutate it!

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/EDJ95

    Must remember not to write "Sioned I am".

    Damn colloquialisms!

    August 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/EFHeras

    It may not be this simple, but does "dw" mean "I" and "i" mean "am"?

    February 22, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/crishale

    Opposite way round, but basically, yes.

    February 22, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

    Helpful. I was wondering the same thing,thanks!

    October 12, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/jmjones97

    So when should it be "sioned dw i" and when should it be "Sioned ydw i"?

    January 28, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/crishale

    It doesn't matter - "dw" and "ydw" are just variants of the same word.

    January 29, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/xXBad_WolfXx

    Correct; for example, one could say "Tiwtor cymraeg ydw i" (Pardon my spelling on "tiwtor", it may be wrong!), "I'm a Welsh teacher/tutor" OR "Tiwtor cymraeg dw'i" (Same meaning)

    January 30, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

    When to pronounce "s" "sh" in Welsh ?

    February 11, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/crishale

    I didn't know the answer before I tried to answer your question, but: as a general rule, it's a "sh" when you have "si" followed by a vowel sound, in words such as "siwgr", "esiampl" or "siawns" and it's an "s" when there is no "i" or when that's followed by a consonant, in words such as "sicr", "sidan" and "sinamon". In a casual look through, I couldn't find any that weren't loan words from English, though (even "sicr" is from Middle English "siker"), which is interesting.

    February 11, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

    Thanks

    February 12, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/frenchietobe

    Sam dwi i

    January 20, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/vxckr

    Why do you say "Dw i wedi blino" but not "Sioned dw i"

    June 26, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
    Mod
    • 1533

    There are two basic ways of constructing a sentence in Welsh.

    The first is the normal Verb-Subject-Object

    eg 'Ces i siocled' = I had chocolate (lit:- Had I chocolate)

    In the present tense we use 'Bod' the verb 'to be'

    eg' Dw i'n hapus = I am happy (lit 'Am I happy') or your example 'Dw i wedi blino' = I am tired (lit 'Am I tired)

    The second way of forming a sentence is the emphatic one where we change the word order.

    We could use it in your example:- 'WEDI BLINO dw i' = 'I am TIRED' (Lit:- TIRED I am)

    However that useage is a bit archaic, these days it's only really used to express names and jobs.

    Sioned dw i = I am Sioned :- this is very common in Welsh as a way of introducing oneself

    Meddyg dw i = I am a doctor :- this is the standard way of talking about a job

    June 26, 2017
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