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  5. "Draig dych chi?"

"Draig dych chi?"

Translation:Are you a dragon?

January 26, 2016

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

How did you know?:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

Perhaps the gold hoard you're lying on gave the clue... ;) Or the charred tube of toothpaste?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idshanks

Interesting. Is the ‘ch’ in Welsh always a back sound despite the surrounding vowels? I'm used to every language (except my own) having this sound change based on surrounding vowels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kalitan

I noticed that too...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsperdana

So 'r' after 'd' or 't' is not rolled?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwsogl

Rs are always slightly rolled, wherever they occur in the word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

Have a lingot for the second language related question on the thread. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alkimeer

Do dragons play a common role in Welsh folklore/mythology? Any Kelpies like Scottish folklore exist?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwsogl

I only know one story about dragons, which is the Merlin story and I don't recall any creatures like the kelpies, but the afanc haunts some of the Welsh lakes and there are plenty of fairies. Never try to cheat a fairy. It always ends badly. And it's best not to marry one either, it usually ends in divorce. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Icha648081

......How did you know?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

It was suspicious when you heated your lunch by simply breathing to it. :) Not to mention the spare princesses in your wardrobe ;) :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilysaw

Does Welsh have articles? How do you differentiate between "dragon" and "a dragon" as in the translation of this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

There is no indefinite article in Welsh, but the definite article is y (or yr before vowels, 'r after vowels). Note that the first two forms can also mean "that, which, whom, whose" but in this usage they are often omitted in colloquial speech.

On a side note, there is also no indefinite article in Latin, Sanskrit, Vietnamese, Lithuanian, most Slavic languages, Irish, Icelandic or Semitic languages. In the first 5, there is no definite article, either.


[deactivated user]

    So now I know how to say that I am not a fish in Polish, and how to ask if my dialog partner is a dragon in Welsh...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EduardAlex13

    Well i know to say that i am an elephant in Swedish.


    [deactivated user]

      Another vital skill ;)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deserttitan

      Is "dych chi" supposed to be [deekh khee]? Or [duh khee]? I learned the latter.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwsogl

      Unfortunately it varies from area to area. As I'm from North Wales, I actually say, "Dach chi"! As long as you stick to one pronunciation when speaking, it will be fine.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yadwinder_gadari

      How do differentiate between a question and a statement ? Because in Welsh, both of them seem to have the same word order.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

      Many languages (including mine, Hungarian) applies the same word order for a statement and a question, making difference with intonation and stresses in speech, and with full stops, exlamation and question marks in writing. In English I often see that punctuation is "misused" (for the foreign speaker) and misleading the beginners who learn English. E.g. an imperative must have an exclamation mark in my language and a question must have the question mark because the word order won't help you. In speech it is even harder because the same word sequence may mean several slightly different statements according to the intonation and stresses. I don't know if it applies to Welsh, too (this is a question here, native / advanced speakers!) but I assume it...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ag3n7_z3r0

      Learning the important questions first, I see!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeonMoogle

      This just may be my favorite Duo sentence of all time! Considering the fact that the Welsh flag has a dragon on it, this sentence is quite relevant!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jumpthewalls

      The Welsh know what's up, it seems


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AwesomeBiggles

      We certainly do :D


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meliv23

      Only on a friday


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

      It would be a good sentence for practice: Dydd Gwener draig dw i.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff121271

      This is going to be an awesome course.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sian3449

      Well of course I am, duur.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oneadventuree

      Of course I am. Rawr.


      [deactivated user]

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jessi.solomon

        Why, yes. How did you find out?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/macroy99

        Who knows? Nowdays its hard to say whos who!)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/misskm1

        Im not dragon -_-


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_raselle

        I am sorry but I don't understand this. When can I use this sentence? Is there something dragon-related in Welsh that we, learners should know? :)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

        There's a red dragon on the flag of Wales.

        There's also a lot of old Welsh legends about dragons.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieWells11

        Are you a dragon xD


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Little_Luna_X0

        I am not the dragon you are looking for..


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Little_Luna_X0

        That was a little too easy to be on the strengthening test. Maybe it could be a bit more complex....


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EduardAlex13

        I love how the welsh grammar is so easy!

        Learn Welsh in just 5 minutes a day. For free.