"Dych chi eisiau dysgu Cymraeg?"

Translation:Do you want to learn Welsh?

January 27, 2016

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PolMicheal
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Ydw, dw i!!!

January 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AneurinEE
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So does dysgu mean both 'learn' and 'teach'?

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ElectricHare

Yes it does.

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AneurinEE
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Thanks!

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TeiwazGod

Wouldn't that imply that dysgu would mean to train instead. You could say I want to train in welsh or I want to train you in welsh. train does imply both teach and learn.. anyone have thought on that?

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/iAmOnDuolingoToo

hyfforddi means to train.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Erated8

How Does Train Imply Both Teach And Learn? Your Sentance "I Want To Train In Welsh" Sounds Like You Are Saying You Want To Train In A Place Called Welsh.

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Spoopz

Kind of like the Danish, lære. Irrelevant but kind off not.

January 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Vincie7

Or the Dutch, 'leren' is also both learning and teaching haha

November 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EthanField3
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I found an easy way of remembering dysgu. It's surely a cognate of discere "to learn" in latin the 1st p s of which is disco. It's related to the English disciple.

March 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Not a cognate -- a loanword :)

Welsh has quite a few very old Latin loans, and this is one of them!

December 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/pablopublico
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Loanwords are inherently cognates, aren't they?

March 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pablopublico
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Oh, but there is a heated discussion about the issue of loanwords being cognates or not. As I would say in Spanish and don't have a clue on how to translate it well to English: "give yourselves some polish": https://linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/4667/is-a-loanword-also-a-cognate-or-are-the-two-terms-mutually-exclusive

March 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pablopublico
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"Discipline" is also related.

March 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/4.leaf.clover

Yes, even though I will never use it.

April 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Torbuntu
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What a mouth full! Dw i eisiau dysgu!

January 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ploomich
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Is there anything one can add to the sentence to clarify whether it's learn or teach? Rather different these two...

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ben996134
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Can someone tell me the etymology of the name Cymraeg? What is it's original meaning?

January 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Conrad2161

According to "a concise history of wales" by Geraint Jenkins, the word originally meant cymry "a people of the same district or country", which eventually got used to refer to welsh speakers and the welsh in an old political verse. Interestingly 'welsh' was actually an old english derogatory word meaning "foreigner"

January 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Chickpea88

So neither of the verbs in this sentence are "conjugated" in the English sense? "To learn" in English is the unconjugated form, "I want" is the conjugated form of "to want"--but here it appears that both verbs are in the same "tense", for lack of a better word....?

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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dw is conjugated (first person singular, present tense).

eisiau and dysgu are not conjugated, though, and are in the dictionary form that I've heard called a "verbnoun".

December 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/haleyms425

Ydw!

September 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnVoltage819

Answer: Yes yes, I do want to learn!!!!!

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

Ydw. Dw i eisiau dysgu Cymraeg. ☺

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ay-m-el

Dwi'n hoffi dysgu Cymraeg yn iawn

June 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Erated8

Ydw.

July 16, 2018
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