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https://www.duolingo.com/RuiqiLi1

What's the best language to learn on Diolingo?

I'm currently learning French right now in school but I would love to take a challenge! I heard some languages are hard to learn without practice outside of Duolingo... but if you had to choose one what would it be?

2 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist

A "best language" is very subjective - and that's not a bad thing. If you love Turkish, that's your own "best language", if you love Spanish, then that's your best language. If you love French, then you don't need to take another course (but you could always try some out for fun).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Funky_Puppy

Well, Spanish is a very common language(it has the same number of speakers as English), and it is not too hard to learn. German is a good language to know as well. Esperanto is an easy language that is kinda fun to learn. But to be simple, I would go with Spanish, German, or Esperanto.. Of course, you can do all three.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuiqiLi1

Really? I would LOVE to do Spanish but is Duolingo enough? :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pseudocreobotra

For reading definitely... Especially if you already know some French as the grammar is very similar (they're both Romance languages).

For speaking and listening, Duolingo in general isn't very good. You'll need other resources for that - it's just not possible to get those aspects to a good level without a lot of exposure to natural speech (and, in the case of speaking, also interaction with proficient speakers).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Funky_Puppy

Well, I have read that Duo can give you a level A2 Spanish fluency, although I don't know what that means. =D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyAspeslagh

Duo can give you B1-B2 if you practice really good imo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_European_Framework_of_Reference_for_Languages

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist

I disagree on that from personal experience. I have done the whole course and lots of reviewing, but the course alone brought a solid A2, I've moved on and doing that has sped up my progress and brought me to B2 in the written language and B1 in the spoken language.

To quote the page, a B2 person:

"Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialization."

Not at all. With Duolingo, one can understand the main ideas of basic text - technical discussions are off the table.

"Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party."

Again, not at all. There's simply no way one can be fluent through Duolingo alone as there is no aspect of conversation - which is vital. Interaction is of course possible after using Duolingo, but strain is very much on hand.

"Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options."

Nope. After using Duolingo, text can be produced but it will be basic and mistake-ridden.

The description for B1 doesn't seem nearly as far-fetched, but it's still a bit of a stretch. Perhaps one could say Duolingo brings A2+, since A2 is a slight understatement if you will forgive my wording.


This is not to say Duolingo is bad, I think it's a truly indispensable resource for anyone trying to learn a language, and it gives a huge push forward to a point where the user is prepared to continue his or her studies towards proficiency. It simply must be borne in mind, though, that a high level is not possible through Duolingo alone.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lelieblad

Best language is subjective--you should learn what you want.

But if you want my subjective opinion, you should learn Dutch! :D Because it's great.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Jayde
Mr_Jayde
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To find the best language for you, I think you need to ask yourself this question. What are you looking for in learning a language? Are you trying to get a better understanding of different cultures? Are you planning on moving somewhere new and need proficiency in a language? Are you simply curious about learning a new and challenging skill? This is going to be different for everyone, so it's something you have to figure out for yourself. Maybe you have some Irish ancestry and want to get in touch with your heritage. Maybe you live in a heavily Turkish populated area and want to better understand those around you. Maybe you have a lovely Swedish boyfriend/girlfriend and you want to be able to impress them or their parents. I'd love to be able to give an easy answer to this question, but the truth is, it's different for everybody. You're going to have to look at your life and your interests to see what language is going to suit you best. For some people, that could even be multiple languages.

Just remember, it's important that the language is interesting to you. Otherwise, you may have trouble staying the course. Happy learning!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellaabrera11

I would suggest to you try to learn Spanish . For me, Learning spanish is just easy. It is spoken in 21 countries, one of the most important languages and the third most spoken language in the world. Yay!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Secret_Dartmoore

I'd say EspaƱol if u don't know it already. It will help you the most. Google search the most popular languages. Do the most popular language that you don't know. That's my advice.

2 years ago