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  5. "Chi non lavora non mangia."

"Chi non lavora non mangia."

Translation:Who does not work does not eat.

December 21, 2013

94 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/monica.svarcova

haha in czech we say "bez práce nejsou koláče" is like - no work no cakes :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paranoix

same in Poland "bez pracy nie ma kołaczy"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shenotfound

Same in Slovak "bez práce nie sú koláče" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanrell_

In Portuguese is the same as in Italian! "Quem não trabalha não come." - Who doesn't work, doesn't eat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SagheKin

In Spanish we say "el que no trabaja no come"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucianoPan3

"beleza não põe mesa" like luizfchagas comment is also used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AR_Elsherbiny

In Egypt we say "a non working hand is a no good hand"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iggyl

Also in Russian: Кто не работает, тот те ест. He who doesn't work, doesn't eat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsCobb

Straight out of the Bible: 2 Thessalonians 3:10


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heniaith

Likely inspired by it, but it is also a misquotation. The original Greek says οὐ θέλει ἐργάζεσθαι - "is unwilling to work" - so is not aimed at those unemployed though no fault of their own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dalingo8

MsCobb you're misinterpreting the Bible. The Bible says: who doesn't want to work..!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan9314

it is also similar to the English phrase "No work, no pay".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flying_Blue

... or "No work, no play"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mtb__27

In spanish we say that sentence (who doesn't work doesn't eat) like this: "Quién no trabaja, no come"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtriyaKoll

In Russian we say it exactly the same way as in Italian :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theknife

Кто не работает, тот ест... учись, студент!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tellroman

But we also have Bez truda ne vylovish rybku iz pruda (without work you won't get the fish from the pond) :o)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevin___field

Do people actually say sayings like this without the subject? I've only ever heard my non-native-English-speaking partner say things this way while translating. In Canada we'd say "he who doesn't..." or to be gender-neutral, "if you don't work, you don't eat".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarinaPaula

The chi works as the grammatical subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GameWaiter

I'm asking the same question. It feels wrong to leave out the subject, but then I'm not native and sometimes rules and customs can be different in the UK, US and Australia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birkos

It sounded odd to me (native UK speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

Are you asking about the Italian sentence or the English translation? Not being a native speaker of Italian I can only assume that Duolingo is correct about the Italian sentence. Italian does have a tendency to leave out the subject a lot of the time.

For the English translation, I put in "He who does not work, does not eat" and it was accepted as correct. In fact I think that should be listed as the correct translation (ie. at the top of this discussion page) as no native English speaker would ever say "Who does not work does not eat". Unfortunately I can't work out where to report that this translation is wrong otherwise I would report it.

If/when I get this question again I intend to try "If you don't work you don't eat" because I think that should also be a valid translation of this idiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardSta743899

It counts "If you don't work you don't eat" as a valid translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guilelmo

In German we have exactly the same phrase: "Wer nicht arbeitet, soll auch nicht essen!".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monika-E

what about: Wer nicht sät, der erntet nicht...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrsHumme

I tried with "should not eat", but got rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melaniaro

in Romanian is also like that> who doesn't work should not eat> Cine nu munceste sa nu manance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tagliatutti

In portuguese we have the exact same phrase. Also the variant "quem nao trabuca nao manduca"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrinaNova

Why don't try: 1) No song, no supper! 2) А horse that will not carry a saddle must have no oats!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebecca451058

As a speaker of NZ English I would say 'he who does not work does not eat' - it's slightly old fashioned but so are most idioms/proverbs :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

I agree so I tried it and it was accepted. Is there somewhere I can petition for the official translation (ie at the top of this page) to be changed?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kocherhans

In English, we usually begin idioms like this with "He who doesn't work..." instead of just "Who doesn't work...". The latter sounds strange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susanna35

The reason this proverb (not idiom) is so wide-spread is because, as mentioned by MsCobb, it is straight out of the Bible. You can expect it in any culture that has Christian roots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_Oinkster

Thanks for pointing out that proverbs and idioms are different. Very helpful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rona.y

In Hebrew : whם works on Saturday eve shall eat on Saturday מי שטרח בערב שבת יאכל בשבת


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nolaurus

Кто не работает, тот не ест. ┐( ̄ー ̄)┌


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthiasKDK

I put in 'He who works not, eats not' to see if it accepted. It didn't c': When I first saw it, I thought of that version from John Smith XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

I would say, "Anyone who does not work does not eat." Not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen816474

Is this quote by john smith?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen816474

Is this a quote from John smith?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gungor.zen

Emek olmazsa yemek olmaz in turkısh we say. If you dont make an effort you wont get any meal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingoandros

In times of computerization, I think, this sensence is cynical!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

How so?

These days, "work" is much more than just labor. It's any productive activity. There are plenty of very important jobs that are computer-related.

Besides which, even if something is no longer relevant today doesn't mean we shouldn't learn about how things were in the past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingoandros

In times where jobs become less and less, because of computerization, persons are not responsible for having no work. Every person should eat. Not only working people. Because of this, I feel this sentence cynical. That`s my opinion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeWerner2

It's a mistranslation, the scripture says "who is unwilling to work..." - and my old man took all sorts of jobs because he was too proud and stubborn to ask the state for money (here we do have a strong social net, bordering on being generous, so he would have gotten it, especially with wife and kids)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingoandros

“Who does not work, does not eat” is a bit different to the German phrase “Wer nicht arbeitet soll auch nicht essen”. That means “Who does not work, should not eat” Its a phrase that´s roughly out of the bible, but there they say “Who does NOT WANT to work, should not eat” and thats a clear difference because of the “does not want”! The German phrase is because of the decreasing possibility to get jobs really cynical. The Nazis have implemented this vision under the horrible program "Arbeit macht frei!" I think, that`s why I am as sensitive on this a bit related phrases!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ken364727

正当な対価は正当な働きに、と言った意味かな?

日本語では「働かざる者食うべからず」でしょうか。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

あなたが正しいと思います。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lili976355

Който не работи, не трябва да яде - Who doesn't work should not eat, Bulgarian :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T.A99667

"He who does not work, does not eat"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milad405258

In Persian we say: "نابرده رنج، گنج میسر نمی‌شود" Something like "no pain no gain"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

Translated by Google as "Without suffering, treasure is not possible."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

English has both "No pain no gain" and "He who does not work does not eat". They mean different things, though.

"No pain no gain" is a good equivalent to "نابرده رنج، گنج میسر نمی‌شود". It's about natural consequences, cause-and-effect. If you don't put in the effort, you won't reap the benefit. If you don't plant the seeds, the crops won't grow.

However, "He who does not work does not eat" is an old quote and is much more literal. It means that if anyone is not doing their fair share of the work, they're not allowed to eat.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_who_does_not_work,_neither_shall_he_eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andersonn88

Wth is SHAN'T? It appeared in the correction!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

"Shan't" is the contraction of "shall not".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dosophiax

This is an awkward translation in English, if not ungrammatical. It should be "He who doesn't work, doesn't eat" (or another pronoun, if you prefer).

Googling "who doesn't work, doesn't eat" doesn't get you original English results! (Try it yourself)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

Awkward, sure. No one talks like this anymore. I'd call it archaic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anthonyc935219

Whoever does not work....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

Flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vulpes.smallfox

Can this be turned to a question as in: "Chi non lavora?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freddo185559

"He who does not work, does not eat" Is a better translation for this expression in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziavic

I put "you reap what you sow", which I thought was an idiom with more or less the same meaning. Alas it seems the object of the exercise is to provide a literal translation, not a similar idiom. Mea culpa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_Oinkster

Interesting. I was thinking about "you reap what you sow" too. Then I read Susanna35's post pointing out that "Chi non lavora non mangia" is a proverb, rather than an idiom. I forgot about the difference. That being said, I bet some proverbs could be used figuratively as idioms. In fact, I'm pretty sure some idioms originated as proverbs. Somebody could totally use "Chi non lavora non mangia" in a figurative way that has nothing to do with eating or working. However, I came up with this example below to show how "Chi non lavora non mangia" won't always work very well to mean "You reap what you sow."

[Makes sense:] Joseph: I've been an alcoholic my whole life and now my body is falling apart. Mary: You reap what you sow.

[Doesn't make sense:] Joseph: I've been an alcoholic my whole life and now my body is falling apart. Mary: One must work to eat.

I actually tried "you reap what you sow" today before reading this discussion, so I was thinking like you were. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziavic

Ah, that makes a lot of sense. Great explanation - thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnny99999

The English version is grammatically incorrect, as it is missing an object pronoun. "Who does not work does not eat" is obviously not correct English. It ought to read:

"She who does not..." "He who does not..." "They who do not..." "We who do not..."

etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

"He/she/we/they" are subject pronouns. And ellipsis is not error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnny99999

Oops I got the technical term wrong, so sorry. Duo's answer is still incorrect, English doesn't allow "who" to be used in such a way. If one really doesn't want to use he/she/it/they/them/we one can use "Whoever", not "Who".

Oh and btw, omission is not ellipsis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

omission is not ellipsis.

That is literally what the word means.

https://literaryterms.net/ellipsis/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbie351

I expected much more of this unit. It really is rather feeble and not worth the1000 things it cost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

The optional units only cost 30 lingots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

Where do I find optional units? Or are they only available in the app version?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

They are available on the web site.


https://i.imgur.com/MTP03wh.png


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SAJIDVALEN

Ok the exercise do not show in its lines DOES NOT just show DO NOT, I do know that when we refer to "who" we must say "does" but Duolingo show in the reference just DO NOT if this is right please correct the Duolingo refereces


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

Okay, the exercise does not offer "does not", it just has "do not". I do know that when we say "who" we must say "does", but Duolingo just has "do not". If this is right, please correct it.

"Who" can be singular or plural.

A person who does not work, does not eat.
People who do not work, do not eat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SonoUnaFarfalla

I put "whom does not work does not eat and i got it wrong DX


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

Because "whom" is an object pronoun, and "who" is clearly the subject here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rasyaknam

I think the accurate translation should be " no pain, no gain/ no pains, no gains", isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/italikaren

Maybe "no pain, no gain", but not the plural version.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrinaNova

This idiom has another meaning. No pain, no gain = If you don't risk you will never win! or All or nothing! or :))) Who doesn't risk doesn't drink champagne!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2440

No, not accurate at all.

"No pain, no gain" means that if you don't exert effort toward a goal, you can't reap its rewards. Like if you don't exercise, you won't get fit.

"He who doesn't work doesn't eat" is much more literal. It is the threat of punishment for failing to do your share of work. You didn't contribute to the day's labors? You don't get dinner.

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