"Dw i wedi codi."

Translation:I have got up.

January 28, 2016

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Gingerontheroof

Would "I got up" be acceptable in this case? I don't see why it shouldn't be.

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanieSchaffer

Wedi constructions like this are "have done" rather than "did." Using "I got up" would be a past tense while "I have gotten up" would be present perfect. Same thing in English, where the two tenses convey similar but subtly different meanings.

January 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1415

'Gotten' is an Americanism. Although considered acceptable in the States, I believe, it is slang here and not considered correct English. It actually comes from late middle-English. So I don't know if it would be considered a correct answer?

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/4meerschweinchen

We use 'gotten' in Australia as well :) Actually, the sentence 'I have got up' sounds strange to me (though I know it is correct). My brain just feels like there should be a 'gotten' in there.

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MargaretWe2

For me (native English speaker), both "I have got up." AND "I have gotten up." sound odd in English. I would only ever say, "I got up." This is causing me a bit of bother in this unit.

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1415

I agree with Margaret that 'I got up' would actually be the most natural thing to say in real life as a native English speaker. The expression has been rather contrived to fit the topic. :-)

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1

I agree. I would use "I have got up" for emphasis when being accused of being still in bed! If I was telling you what time I arose from bed this morning I would say "I got up at 7 am" and "Dw i wedi codi am saith o'r gloch y bore 'ma".

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1415

Some say it here too, but it's not standard. Mostly impact of American influence. :-)

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie

Don't forget that Duolingo is mostly based on American English... ;) I am not too happy about it, 'cos I've learnt some XVII century British in the school ;) Perhaps XIX. century, okay. Gives me the hell, all the time :D ;)

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1415

Yes, I might have expressed that better. :-) I did try to clarify later.

However, it must be admitted that we do enjoy (perhaps rather too much) teasing the Americans, usually in an affectionate manner. Sadly, they do have a tendency to take things overly literally.

Nevertheless, it does sometimes irritate us a little that (as a generality) the Americans have little understanding of our culture or humour and seem unwilling to make an attempt to understand a few different words or different usage. You would think that when learning a new language they might be open to learning new ways of using their own. Especially as Australians, New Zealanders and usually even Canadians (although they are increasingly influenced by their bigger neighbours) seem to have little problem understanding our culture and humour, indeed sharing much of both in common.

Joking aside, since, only about 20% (I believe) of residents is Wales are actually fluent in Welsh, and there is a large percentage who speak no Welsh at all; understanding Welsh does benefit from a certain understanding of British English and culture.

'Gingerontheroof' is quite correct. It was an amazing achievement by the course creators to get the course released in around three months. Especially as Welsh presents a number of (almost) unique challenges. American English and British English actually differ very little compared to Welsh as spoken/written within different parts of Wales (as I understand it). There is apparently a whole other literary Welsh as well. So there was a lot of debate about how to construct the course, and decisions to made before the course was even started.

All that said, most American comments, that I've seen, have been courtious and polite, and perfectly reasonable.

The good folks of Pittsburg who created Duolingo, for all its occasional American bias and weirdness, produced something quite remarkable and flexible that is capable of coping with the vagaries of different flavours of English rather well on the whole.

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gingerontheroof

Yeah but don't forget that the creators of the welsh course are nearly guaranteed to be all welsh and this is only a beta so there will be some forms of American English that aren't accepted. (Sorry this came off as aggressive, didn't mean it like that and I couldn't think of any other ways to say it.)

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie

No offence taken :) I just don't see the reason to take a possible translation that is wrong in British (and Welsh) English, but acceptable in American that is privileged sitewise. :) As I tried to write American English often disturbs me, too, but I think we can tolerate each other—even learning foreign languages is about a kind of tolerance. :) But since I am not a native English speaker it is more like an interesting thing for me or a conversation piece, and I won't cry (too loud ;) ) if Americanisms would be dropped from the Welsh course :D

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1415

:-) As I also said below (earlier), I'm not suggesting Anericanisms shouldn't be accepted - just that I thought it might not (yet). In fact it makes little difference since we don't have to answer in Americaisms. If it helps them with the course, that's good. We actually have an advantage, since we are frequentky exposed to American culture through films (movies) and TV and are aware of the way they frequently mangle our language. In the French course (some time ago) the correct translation of gentil was given as awesome (it really isn't), and none of the correct answers were accepted! So it makes a pleasant change for us to learn one British language correctly using another. :-)

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie

I completely agree this part :D That little difference of might did not come through until now :)

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1415

Actually, I see from the hints from later exercises that 'gotten' is an accepted answer.

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ffwlbart

'Gotten' was certainly used in regular English in England a few centuries ago. The King James Translation of the Bible reads "when I have gotten me honour upon Pharaoh, upon his chariots, and upon his horsemen" - although, admittedly, we don't often speak like that nowadays!

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1415

I think the only place we now use it in normal speech is in the phrase 'Ill gotten gains'. Which is not a phrase that crops up that often, either.

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhaktoryn

I think it should be "I have gotten up".

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
  • 1539

I have gotten up is one of the correct alternatives here

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mei_Basir

I wrote "I have risen" and was marked wrong. Shouldn't that be accepted too?

August 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

'I have got up' or 'I have gotten up' seem to be much more common English usage. 'I have risen' sounds odd these days, at least to my British ears.

August 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mei_Basir

I would expect it mainly in a formal or literary context rather than in everyday speech; I can't tell, of course, whether there would be a different equivalent for that in Welsh.

August 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1

"I have risen" wasn't accepted for this question, but was accepted two questions ago, which looks like a database issue. It is correct, if a little unusual these days (British too!)

September 19, 2017
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