"Dych chi eisiau afal neu lemon?"

Translation:Do you want an apple or a lemon?

January 28, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/4meerschweinchen

so there are no indefinite articles in welsh?

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/xXBad_WolfXx

Nope, only definite articles! :)

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/4meerschweinchen

Just like in Irish!

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Melanzious

Many languages do it! We would say that there are more languages without indefinite articles than languages with! :)

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ideomorph

The n in neu sounds like a rolled r.

February 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Chr.Perrotta

I understand two possible interpretations for this question in English, but I don't know if both can be understood in Welsh as well with this sentence:

1) "Do you want apple or lemon?", like "Choose only one, please."

2) "Do you want apple or lemon?", like "Do you want something? An apple... maybe a lemon..." (offering fruits)

Are both interpretations acceptable with "Dych chi eisiau afal neu lemon?" as well?

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sufyazi

Welsh sometimes sounds like Vietnamese to me.

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

Only because of the robot voice in this course, otherwise it does not at all. I work with Vietnamese people.

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sufyazi

I see. Thanks for the clarification.

February 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

I learned 'moyn' for 'want'. I though 'eisiau' meant need. Maybe I'm remembering wrong.

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewDu3

Both are correct.

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ElectricHare

They say "moyn" in South Wales mainly, but it's slang. I'm not sure where the word comes from. "Angen" is the word for need.

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/silverlight513

All these words like "moyn" that people are saying are from South Wales, yet I've never heard anyone down here use those words. As far as I know, we only use "eisiau". Mind you, most of the teachers come from West or North Wales.

March 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Heysoos1

Two things, a) This language sounds Asian b) Can someone explain the syntax a bit more? If you were to state this as a fact, would you just change the intonation, or does something in here indicate a question?

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/suesskind

You just use a questioning intonation at the end of the sentence, the syntax doesn't change. It sounds Asian because of the recording, I think

February 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TinyTachyon

Oranges and lemons say the bells of Saint Clements...

June 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

Why "afal" is pronounced "aval" ?

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewDu3

One of a number of differences from the English version of the alphabet. F = v like the English f in "of". To make an English f sound Welsh uses ff (double f) like the English "off".

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

"Of" always sounds "off" to me. But to be clear, "f" is always "v" in Welsh yeah ?

June 24, 2016
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