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  5. "Wir haben ein Stellenangebot…

"Wir haben ein Stellenangebot in der Zeitung."

Translation:We have a job offer in the paper.

December 21, 2013

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolZaczk

Stellen = position. Angebot = offer. im Angebot = on sale. Confusing, yes, but I've got it now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonSercely

I think most common in the US would be "help wanted ad". I didn't have the courage to try it though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/starrygordon

'Want ad', which is more like what an American would say, doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosiahSchm5

I tried "help wanted ad" and it didn't accept it. I'm reporting the answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolZaczk

"We have a job advertisement in the newspaper" is accepted. Is this what is meant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorettaONe

I think (in my part of the U.S.) a "job opening" would convey this meaning, if I am really understanding what others are saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vaarlam

"Job opening" or "Help wanted ad" (as RonSercely above suggested) is really what DL is trying to convey. It's a pity DL wasn't savvy enough to accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reasor

Why is the first time it is listing newspaper as 'paper'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Toetya

I've got used to using 'newspaper' on Duo but in real life rarely say that. It's 'paper' or 'papers' for me in real life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFlyingman

Can "Stellenangebot" really be used as a vacancy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saschambaer

Job offer would be a better translation. Vacancy means "freie Stelle" in German (or Vakanz, if you wanna be fancy)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFlyingman

Thank you, I thought it is as you say - job offer or job advertisement. Next time I see this I am going to report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kasra

Well, according to Pons it can also mean "vacant position" : http://en.pons.eu/translate?q=Stellenangebotl=deenin=ac_delf=de

So you probably shouldn't report it :-P In fact, in this sentence "vacant position" fits much better than "job offer", at least the way these terms are used in American English: Usually a job offer is what you get after you apply for the vacant position and pass the interview. The job offer includes the company's proposition for your benefits and compensation; and you then get to accept or reject the offer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolZaczk

True. The problem is the English is unclear. A vacancy in the newspaper literally means that something in the newspaper is missing. The The vacancy is in an office, not in the newspaper. One can publish a vacancy or adverise a job opportunity in the newspaper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelHun729358

In English the assumption is pretty clear: If an offer is in the paper you're misunderstood the posting or the poster in insane.

A job offer is presented to a candidate that the company wishes to employ. It would never be publicly posted. Similarly an employment advertisement might be published IN the newspaper, but if the job is AT the newspaper then the advert, or offer, will be either AT of WITH the newspaper.

That's actually pretty exact.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattD

The simplest American version would be: "We have a want ad in the newspaper." This would recognized anywhere in the U.S.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JungleZL

Work offer is wrong :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david649465

Can a German native speaker comment on whether "Stellenangebot" means a "job offer" (the letter or phone call indicating that you have been offered a job) or a "job opening/advertisement." Based on the context of this sentence, it seems to be the latter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wiebke740885

With the newspaper context it's definitely a job advertisment. There is also the synonym "Stellenanzeige" wich might be clearer. For a job offer we would rather say "Jobangebot", so literally the same :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

"Stelle" means "position" and "Angebot" means "an offering". This word means a job offer for everyone but you can also specify for whom the offer stands.

I'm no native German, but believe me, I speak better German than my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

Please delete your repeated posts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OgnjenG.

It's a spamm. Just click downvote for repeated posts and eventually they will be hidden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

Wenn du so gut Deutsch kannst, dann sei so gut und lösch bitte 19 deiner identischen Posts (oder gleich alle 20...).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joseph.lon

I don't know if it's considered colloquial or not, but I think that most people actually say "Job Notice," for what Duolingo is looking for here. Unfortunately, it will not count as correct. "Vacancy," is really used more for letting people know that some position in the office is vacant (but not necessarily available--the company may not actually be trying to fill the vacancies with new hires). To say you have a vacancy in the paper is unclear because it may imply that a job is available at the newspaper itself for, for example, an editor or a journalist, or it may mean that there's something else missing about the newspaper, like an open spot for an ad. No one would actually say this, so it's difficult to really translate what it could mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OUOrganist

A job OFFER suggests "here's a job, we are offering it." Better English here would be Job OPENING, maybe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sninguistics

Oh, so a classified?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helenvee

Exactly but It's not US usage so not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

"We have a help wanted ad in the classifieds." wasn't accepted. We have classified ads (the classifieds) in the US. I think a single ad in the classifieds would be "an ad in the classifieds."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMay4

Ich denke immer 'Stelle' meint 'Stern'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

Hm... because of "stellar", I assume.

Try to focus on the "r": "the star" and "der Stern".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauletteLe5

'We have a job offer in the newspaper' and 'we have a job offer in the paper' are the same, except mine is a more precise translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

"We have a job offer in the newspaper." is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro_Santiago_

So, how would you say in german if you receive a job offer from the newspaper (meaning the company)? At first glance I understood the sentence in that way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lingjoe

It may be more of a British way of saying it, but:

"We have a job going in the paper"

means the same as

"We have a job advertisement in the newspaper"

and so should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cina554256

I know Zeitung always means newspaper and never just paper, but maybe my English is weak and paper can mean newspaper here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

Yes "paper" is a common alternative to "newspaper" when the context makes it obvious that the reference is to a newspaper (at least in Australia it is). In fact it would be used more often in conversation than "newspaper".

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