https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn

Who is using the Irish course?

odoinn
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I am currently writing an academic paper on the development of the Irish course and I would like to talk a little bit about the Irish course's learners. I have the percentage of user for each country but what I would like is to do is dig a little deeper into these figures. If people could state where in the world they are learning, their nationality and perhaps maybe state why they are participating in the course I would really appreciate it.

Say for example you are learning in Ireland but you are from another country, I would love to know what prompted you to start the course. Or, if you live in the US and are doing the course, are you Irish American or from Ireland or Mexico etc...? And what is your reason for doing the course?

Thanks for taking the time to read this. I am preparing the paper for the American Conference for Irish Studies which will take place in April this year in the University of Notre Dame.

(Please don't post any information that you would be uncomfortable with me sharing in my paper/presentation.)

EDIT: A Chairde, I just want to say thank you to everyone for responding to my post. I really really appreciate it and you have helped my no end. I will post a link to the paper that I am preparing once I have finished. Go raibh maith agaibh uilig.

EDIT EDIT: A Dhaoine Uasaile, I just want to say thanks again to all of you who responded to my questions. I am going to write a more comprehensive paper on the users based on the information contained in this discussion here. Please keep contributing posting. Táim fíorbhuíoch díbh ar fad. I will post a drop box link to the original paper once I present it at the conference.

Final Edit: Just wanted to say thanks again and to post this link to the paper I presented at the American Conference for Irish Studies in Notre Dame for those of you who are interested in reading it: https://www.dropbox.com/s/l83ohxsf4w6bar2/Bringing%20Irish%20to%20the%20Masses%20Final.docx?dl=0

Go raibh maith agaibh go léir arís.

2 years ago

480 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/miletaro

I'm learning in Ireland (Corcaigh), but my country of origin is the United States (Michigan).

I married an Irishman in 2007 and moved here with him shortly afterwards. I applied for, and was granted, Irish citizenship in 2014, and began participating in the Duolingo Irish course about a month later.

I want to learn Irish because as a new Irish citizen I want to embrace as much of my adopted country's culture as I can, and its native language is a critical component to that.

I also want to learn Irish so that I'm better able to assist my seven year old with his Irish homework. I want him to grow up with as much a love for his native culture as I have for it. I might not ever make a step dancer out of him (must choose my battles carefully), but by gods, the boy will learn, love, and speak the Irish language. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamob544
adamob544
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I wish you and your son all the best learning Irish :) Started off very easy for me and now I'm failing Irish exams unfortunately :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OffBrandPickles

No duh, I'm in Michigan and looking to go to Ireland myself! Cheers to '16 and to your son's learning of the language!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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GRMA:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Native speaker in Connemara who was using Duolingo primarily for French but also to sample others.

I was excited at the prospect of many new people giving the language a try, using such an inviting looking medium.

I did the course to see the quality for myself before recommending it to anybody.

I also spent a bit of time going over the early parts of the course finding mistakes/bugs, so that beginners would be instructed as well as possible.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huffdogg

GRMA for that. Any native speaker looking to help make my own learning experience better/more accurate gets a Lingot from me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Tá fáilte romhat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
Mod
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A Chara, tá muid fíorbhuíoch díot as d'aiseolas. Fair play duit agus go raibh maith agat as an aiseolas seo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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I ndáiríre, tá níos mó déanta agaibhse don Ghaeilge ná aon rud a rinné ár rialtas leis na cianta. S'dócha go bhfuil sé sin d'aon turas, ach sin scéal eile.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MoChuisleMoChroi
MoChuisleMoChroi
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Go raigh maith agat!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Tá fáilte romhat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamob544
adamob544
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Lucky you from a Gaeltacht area :( I suppose the Irish exams are so easy for you haha

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaseyJuneWolf

So what did you decide? (I assume you like the quality of the course or you wouldn't still be here, but am curious to hear what you think.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smhwrd
smhwrd
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I'm learning in Northern Ireland, with us being part of the U.K my nationality is officially British but I feel my nationality is weirdly both British and Irish.

I'm learning Irish because I was brought up as part of the protestant/unionist community where the language is still somewhat taboo among some and isn't taught in schools. After starting university and making loads of friends from the catholic/republican background and after several visits to the republic, I really wanted to understand more about the other half of the culture in my country that I had never been exposed to before. I was already using duolingo to revive my decrepit Spanish skills when I saw they had an Irish course so I thought I'd give it whirl.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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A Chara,

It is great to hear that the course has opened up access to the language so that all communities on the Island can experience Irish as a language first and foremost and not as a political/religious marker. I wish you luck with it.

Go raibh maith agat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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If you were born before 1st January 2005 anywhere on the island of Ireland, then you are entitled to Irish citizenship and can apply for an Irish passport. (If you were born on the island of Ireland after 31st December 2004, then different rules apply — see here for further details.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Without wishing to step on anyone's toes, the concepts of citizenship and nationality and passports can be a bit more complex in Northern Ireland than that, and it is absolutely not the case that people who are interested in the Irish language must inevitably aspire to hold an Irish passport. The choice of which passport to hold can be a very political act for one person, and a very practical act for the person standing beside them.

The Good Friday Agreement affirmed the right of people in Northern Ireland "to identify themselves and be accepted as Irish or British, or both". smhwrd may be entitled to apply for an Irish passport, but he is also perfectly entitled to embrace the Irish language while retaining his own sense of Britishness. Associating the Irish Language with an either/or choice on nationality or citizenship isn't in the best interests of the language - in fact it leads directly to incidents like Gregory Campell's "Curry my yoghurt can coca coalyer" coat-trailing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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I absolutely agree, and it was not my intention at all to present any sort of either/or choice, or to imply that an interest in the Irish language inevitably leads to an interest in Irish citizenship.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michel36832

Spot on. Speaking from south end of the island, language is far more important to me than any allegiance to the mickey mouse gombeen, neoliberal church state fusion we have here. I certainly wouldn't be asking anyone to hold a candle for it. I would be encouraging people in NI, and any other background for that matter, to learn Irish though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smhwrd
smhwrd
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Yes I'm very aware of this, many people here used to take advantage of this to get free a university education in Scotland. However, I am a full time student and British passports were cheaper at the time I got mine.

Not that I really care what my nationality on paper is anyway, having a personal sense of culture and belonging is much more important.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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It's not weird at all to feel Irish while also valuing UK citizenship, sure for hundreds of years everyone on the island was in that same boat! If you're interested, check out An Droichead which runs Irish classes and events in east Belfast :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/starbright98

I'm from Northern Ireland too, and learning Castilian. I've been thinking of learning Irish too but I am not certain.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larryone
larryone
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I would encourage it for many reasons. Knowledge of this language gives tremendous insight into the origins of how we use English on this island, and gives a different perspective on the life of this place. I know that in the past it has been used as a divisive tool and used to insult communities, but I think encouraging more knowledge of it across all communities can help towards greater understanding and mutual respect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonABBreizh

Do it ! Just do it ! Now ! ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michel36832

Great to see. Béir bua. Irish language has been wedded to catholicism and narrow politics for too long. Twasn't always thus.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michel36832

p.s. could you point me in the way of interesting stuff from the norn irish unionist community... literature, music etc. We're told nothing about it down here except the 12th

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sulevia1

Newly enrolled (couple of days ago) onto the irish course.

I am french but have lived in London, UK for over 30 years. I have always loved Ireland, its people, its culture, its landscapes, its myths and legends.... When I did my language degree (English, Spanish, Italian) many years ago, all my friends were going to the US or UK for their year abroad, I chose to go to Ireland. Spent a wonderful year in Dublin, and returned the following year to live in Galway.

I have always wanted to learn a gaelic language; I feel we learn so much more about a cultural 'identity' when we understand the local language. 'Native' languages carry a magical layer of experience, closely connected to a sense of the place where they emerged, which no translation can do justice to.....

If you listen to an irish song, in irish, you can 'hear' the landscape in the sounds, the crashing waves of the ocean in the '-each', the prickly beauty of the gorse in the '-aíl', the rolling greenness of soft hills in the '-ín'....

(does anyone else fee this?)

So really, my reason for doing the course is to simply continue my love-story with Ireland! It is entirely for personal pleasure, not work or family related. I would never have been able to afford - or maybe just justify paying for - private tuition to learn irish, so I am very grateful to have found duolingo to get me started!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikebeeee

I feel we learn so much more about a cultural 'identity' when we understand the local language. 'Native' languages carry a magical layer of experience, closely connected to a sense of the place where they emerged, which no translation can do justice to.....

love the wording

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michel36832

Allez les bleus!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AernJardos
AernJardos
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I'm an American living in the U.S. (Idaho). My grandmother's family had very strong Irish roots. My personal reasons for learning Irish stem from a love of words, mythology, unusual languages, as well as a desire to honor my family.

I found it a horrible shame that Irish was dying out. When I was young I swore I would at least give an honest attempt to learn all the languages of my blood, which were English, Italian, Irish, and German.

English comes from a mix of Dutch and Irish, that then had some French injected into it, and was later retconned with Latin rules. Because of this, if you can read Dutch, Irish, and modern English, you can generally make out Middle English and older works. To someone who has etymology as a hobby, Irish is an awesome root that's generally ignored in the linguistic world. Which is silly.

Those are my more polite reasons. There's one more that is more personal to me but I'm going to share it anyways.

Any time I see a language being ignored, shunned, marginalized, or just simply get told "it's pointless to learn" I get angry. I get stubborn. I start to try my hardest to learn it just to spite people. My current list of languages to learn is: Italian, Irish, Dutch, Swahili, Yiddish, Maltese, possibly Hindi, at least one of the Nordics, I'm still deciding if I can fit on a Native American language (I have Hawaiian cousins), and a few others that have slid off my plate. I'll probably pick up Latin if Duo ever makes a course for it. I refuse to let amazing languages wither away and die just because "you'll never get a job with that," "you'll never go there," "no-one speaks that," etc.

I can't change the world. I can't save them all but I can certainly fill my life with them. I can at least try to make sure they aren't forgotten for just one person. All my life I have seen schools beat the love of learning out of people and it breaks my heart.

Languages open up entire worlds, cultures, histories. The sheer power to read the written word unlocks the thoughts and beliefs, the fears, the hopes and dreams, of entire generations of people. What they loved, what they hated, what they found praiseworthy... of whole countries... for thousands of years!

The amazing thing about DuoLingo is it gives me hope that this astounding knowledge won't be lost forever. I have watched in awe as life is being breathed back in to these unique languages. As people around the world come together to share and learn. It is beyond moving. Yes, DuoLingo will never replace face to face encounters, but it is a start. It plants a seed. And sometimes, that is all it takes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/denkim
denkim
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Thank you so much for what you say. I think you've put your finger on some important truths that are appreciated all too rarely. Languages are so much more than means of everyday communication: they are shaped by, and in their turn shape, the whole thought-world and culture of their speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikebeeee

I'll probably pick up Latin if Duo ever makes a course for it

Me too!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dc108
dc108
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Hi Michelle!
I too share your thirst for knowledge and understanding through languages, and yes also to honor my family through learning some of their tongues. I very much liked your story. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikebeeee

English comes from a mix of Dutch and Irish.. really!!!!! trippy

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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no language should ever die :) we must do what we can and follow our hearts to learn the languages of the past and remember the lost lessons of these and any beautiful language

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikebeeee

I'll probably pick up Latin if Duo ever makes a course for it

Me too!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nwshredder2406

Could not agree more, neighbor! :) (I'm in Montana)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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I'm in the US. I do have a little Irish heritage, but my interest mostly comes from linguistics and the fact that the course release here coincided with a trip I took to Ireland. Things like the VSO word order, consonant mutation, slender/broad split, and small vocabulary I just find really cool. I do also find something alluring about languages that aren't spoken by many people.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Thanks very much for your response it is greatly appreciated. Go raibh maith agat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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VSO word order etc. I know of, but what's this small vocabulary? It seems to me that Irish has a huge wealth of vocabulary, some borrowed from Norse, Latin or Norman french, but most being home-grown Gaelic terms descended straight from PIE

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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The fact that there are no words specifically for e.g. to have or to like, instead using phrases (which are often quite poetic).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

That's not a vocabulary issue - it's just a grammatical difference. Even in English "have" isn't exclusively about possession - "I had just eaten a sandwich" or "Paul has been telling me about your trip", and "like" isn't exclusively used for indicating your fondness like something - it's also used for comparing things - "one of these things is not like the other". Is that evidence that English has a small vocabulary, because it uses the same word for different things, instead of using two different words?

The vocabulary covered on Duolingo is necessarily limited, though it will expand considerably at some point in 2016, when Tree 2.0 is released. But for anything beyond fairly rudimentary conversation, you will very quickly encounter vocabulary that Duolingo doesn't cover.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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I'm just repeating what I've read other places. Irish has a stronger tendency than most languages to use phrases instead of new words (because to like and to have are hardly a comprehensive list of verbs that don't "exist" in Irish) and I've seen that described as it having a small vocabulary. It may also have to do with Irish's status as sort of a rural, local language, I don't really know. Regardless, the particular phrasing is kind of just a semantic issue.

edit: Some poking on the internet seems to suggest (not particularly conclusively, of course) that English has ~200k words in common use (I'm not sure how technical/regional something has to be before being discounted) while focloir has about 42k headwords for Irish. Honestly I'm not sure if the 200k number I got from Oxford would also be a headword thing, so we'll take Japanese as another point of comparison. Dictionaries seem to be around 200k as well, when they're trying to be more comprehensive. Even selected dictionaries will be in the 75k-125k range. You can't really accurately count the number of words in any natural language of course, but it's still interesting I think.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

That's a bit of a "angels on the head of a pin" argument - English doesn't have anything even close to 200K words in common use, unless you use a strange definition of common (The OED claims about 200K in "current use", which isn't the same as common use). Most people would have an vocabulary in English of about 20K words, and most of the "new" words in English, whether loan words from other languages, technical terms, or newly invented terms, are just as relevant to Irish, whether or not they are included in the dictionary - though if Foras na Gaeilge had the resources that the OED has, they'd be added there too. While it doesn't address the issue of Irish, this article from the Economist describes the difficulties with comparing the size of the vocabularies of different languages

Your use of the phrase "small vocabulary" suggested that this might limit what can be said in Irish, or make it possible to actually learn the whole vocabulary, and your focus on verbs might indicate that you think Irish is unusual in using phrasal verbs, but for practical purposes, the vocabulary of Irish isn't particularly limiting, (not to mention that it's status as a language spoken almost exclusively by bi-lingual speakers of English gives it immediate access to new terminology - LASER as an acronym probably won't be found in an Irish dictionary, but the noun léasar would).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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would a good idea to start to resolve this would be to have a duolingo lesson or two of idioms or phrases that aren't really present or translated directly in other languages (interspersed through out the Irish course)? I think idioms are really important to start learning in any language and concerning Irish for its prevalent use of idioms its very important :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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I am German and I am in Germany (Ruhrgebiet area). I am learning Irish out of curiosity, just for the fun of it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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So many languages O_O

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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Language learning itself gets easier with each new language ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pepethefrog246

Agreed

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ESTglott
ESTglott
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C'est en forgeant qu'on devient forgeron! Cleachtadh dein máistir! La práctica hace al maestro! Oefening baart kunst!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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Übung macht den Meister.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swiftredfoxes
swiftredfoxes
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  • Övning ger färdighet. (Swedish)
  • Practice makes perfect.

I just wanted to comment as well, LOL! :v

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ESTglott
ESTglott
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La pactica rende perfetti!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CocoDexterity

ubung macht den meister! ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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Würdest du dich interessieren für einen Irischkurs für Deutschsprächigen?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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Ja, warum nicht? Generell gibt es wenige Kurse mit der Ausgangssprache Deutsch. Leider beherrsche ich (außer Englisch), keine Fremdsprache gut genug, um selbst zu einem Kurs beizutragen. Aber die Nachfrage ist sicher recht klein - wahrscheinlich besteht mehr Bedarf z.B für einen Italienisch- oder Russischkurs. Diejenigen Deutschsprachigen, die sich für Irland und die irische Sprache interessieren, beherrschen wahrscheinlich auch Englisch gut genug, um diesen Kurs hier zu absolvieren.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Vielen dank:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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Bitte schön :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ESTglott
ESTglott
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Danke schön, aber das geht bereits zu dankbar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ESTglott
ESTglott
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Me too (but im in Estonia, Tallinn).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Thank you:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Colbysgray

same

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pepethefrog246

Along with a lot of other languages,apparently.For the same reason,I suppose?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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It depends. Some, I have studied before, and now just "brushing up" on Duo - others, I want to learn for travelling - and some only out of curiosity. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/STEEZY-DEO

Haha. I'm challenging myself to learn every language on Duolingo by the time I'm probably 18 :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdubois_79

Hahahah I am learning four through University but decided I love pretty much all the languages Duolingo is offering and its my goal too...loving it so far...and only started German today.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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And they keep adding new languages...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Maith thú:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nettlejuice

I am in the US (Pennsylvania). I have absolutely no Irish ancestry. I fell in love with Irish literature in college and always wanted to learn the language, but found it incredibly difficult. Finding Duolingo inspired me to try again after many years of giving up.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GavinArmstrong
GavinArmstrong
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Irish but living in the US (Oregon). I'm doing the course to try improve my written Irish. My spelling in Irish is just not the best, and I think Duo really helps me with that.

My motivation to keep improving my Irish comes from a lot of things. I've been living abroad for long enough that I really value the identity we have in having our own cultural language. In college I ended up becoming friends with a group of Gaeilgeoirí who never reverted to English amongst themselves, went on to raise their kids and families in Irish, and really made me see how effortless it could be to keep speaking Irish in daily life. Long term my intention is to make speaking Irish a more full-time part of my personal life.

Not to mention, TG4 probably has the best programming on Irish tv! :D

Go n-éirí an t-ádh leat leis an gcomhdháil!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EavanM

Where in Oregon? Do you participate in any Irish language groups here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VonUberleb

I'm Finnish. I'm learning Irish both because an American teacher of mine said learning Irish was harder than learning Finnish, and because an event I attend biannually in Ireland has always been organized by/welcoming towards speakers of Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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an American teacher of mine said learning Irish was harder than learning Finnish

"Challenge accepted" lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VonUberleb

Pretty much my immediate reaction :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aleksarc

I'm Brazilian living in Ireland. I started learning Gaeilge because I really like Irish culture and history, it is definitely very vivid and present everywhere and it makes you want to know more and experience a bit of it. Hopefully I'll get some basic skills.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crussmor
crussmor
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I am Irish, living in Spain. My wife is Spainsh and my children are bilingual in both Spanish and English. I used to have a fairly good command of Irish but living away for more than a decade, it had become a tad rusty - I use Duolingo to brush up on my Irish but also to teach my two daughters - they love it! and are not too bad at it either.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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That's the thing about Duolingo. Kids often find it fun and once they understand how it works, the gamification side of it might encourage them to self-study.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh.Hogan
Josh.Hogan
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I'm in Atlanta, Georgia. My ancestry is predominately Irish, Scottish, and English, and I've always wanted to learn Irish and/or Scottish Gaelic, and Duolingo gave me the chance to get started on Irish without investing a lot of money up front. I've also studied Welsh for a short time as an exchange student in Wales. I've long had a fascination with Celtic languages, literature, and history apart from my interest in my ancestry.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Thank you for you reply:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schatzie
Schatzie
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I live in Wisconsin, U.S. I have no ethnic Irish connections. The closest we get is that one of my husband's grandmothers had a little Welsh background, and part of his family emigrated from Scotland generations ago. I am simply fascinated by language, and wanted to expand out of the Romance and Germanic languages to try "something completely different." My family background is all German, and although my parents were born here, German was their first language. I find the use of vowels in written Irish, as well as the lenition and eclipsis to be very challenging. The word order is not so much a problem for me. The prepositions drive me crazy! I am SO grateful that Duolingo exists! I am looking forward to hearing more auditory Irish in the lessons. We have traveled in The Dingle peninsula, and hope to go back some day.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I just saw this notice about a Deireadh Seachtaine Gaeilge in Milwaukee on March 4th.

http://www.daltai.com/events/915/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schatzie
Schatzie
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Thanks! This year maybe not, but perhaps next time!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EirianL
EirianL
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I live in the United States (Texas). I used to be addicted to Memrise. When I first discovered it, I was looking for a course to start out with and I chose Irish. I ended up loving it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CHarrell13
CHarrell13
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Another Texan here (hi!). I'm partially of Irish ancestry, so I started the course as a "connect with my origins" thing, as soon as it hit beta. The poor audio frustrated me, though, so I've set it aside until the new audio goes live.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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The new audio has been reviewed by the contributors and will be added in the near future. Thanks for the belief in us and your patience:) The speaker Duolingo got this time has lovely pronunciation as well by the way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huffdogg

I cannot WAIT to experience this

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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That's excellent news; thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tobosaur

I got frustrated a lot.. I'm sad actually because it is very hart to learn language without pronunciation. When I started learning German than I got really sad because that is the way Irish should be set.... "Family" lessons and further get one or two sound pronunciation out of many words...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Go raibh maith agat.;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MKvHdd

I never heard of Memrise before, thanks for mentioning it! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Werenro
Werenro
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I am a Croatian learner and I live in Croatia. Firstly, I was waiting for Russian to arrive, but I was interested in Ireland since high school and find it a beautiful country with rich culture. So, I decided that my first language that I will be learning on Duolingo is going to be Irish and till this day I do not regret it. I fell in love with the language and I enjoy spending time learning every new word in the course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolMicheal
PolMicheal
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Is as na Stáit Aontaithe mé. Tá má ag déanamh stáidear ar an nGaeilge mar is aoibhinn liom go mór í an teanga seo!

I'm from Minnesota (US). I love Irish language and music. I have an interest in Celtic languages in general as well. I'd love to visit someday and hopefully have the opportunity to use what I am learning with other people.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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A Phol, MN? Chaith mé bliain in St. Paul in Ollscoil St Thomas. Is breá liom do stát.:) Go raibh maith agat as an aiseolas seo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magrise
magrise
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Oisin loves Minnesota so much he even has a tattoo of it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Who told you that? (no that Im not saying it aint true):)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyRozman

I am Slovenian and I live in Austria right now... I always wanted to learn Irish, I like the language, I like the country, the music... I tried learning with several books and other stuff, but I just could learn it on my own. Last year I decided to go to Ireland (going this year) to learn the language. I will go to summer school Oideas Gael for 4 weeks, and after that I will travel around the country.

When I asked there where I could learn a little before coming there, they said that some people used duolingo. I started then, and I am slowly learning... I hope to learn some of it so that I am not total newbie when I get there...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Duolingo will never replace immersion, but it is great to soften the blow of arriving in a place without a command of the language. I don't know anybody who speaks Irish who doesn't speak English, but if you're hoping to be immersed, you will be trying not to fall back on that!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyRozman

I am sure it won't... which is why I plan to learn in Ireland... but its much easier to learn from Duolingo, as from books (without a teacher and peers). I also tried Rosetta Stone, and while it makes you repeat everything and is not bad from that point of view, it doesn't give you any background, why things are the way they are (sentences, what words mean, etc.).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lydiacrowe
lydiacrowe
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I'm an American, studying in Iowa, United States.

I'm learning because my family background on my mother's side is Irish, from County Cork. I also teach English at a school where we just got a new student from Northern Ireland whose first language is Irish, so why not learn some basic phrases?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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We just got a new student from Northern Ireland whose first language is Irish

Wow, the chances of that are astronomical...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdMac40
AdMac40
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Not as astronomical as you'd think, surprisingly. A growing number of bunscoils have opened up in the north over the last number of years. Obviously you'd don't hear it everywhere, but I've heard a lot more conversations in the last year or two as gaeilge than I've ever heard before. Certainly on the rise!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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The reason I said astronomical is because there is a rather big distinction between someone attending a Gaelscoil and being fluent. There would be far more fluent speakers Gaelscoils churned out fluent speakers, but they almost invariably don't, unless they are in an actual Gaeltacht and would have been speakers anyway.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EilisNiT

Almost anyone who went to a Gaelscoil for the entirety of their education would be relatively fluent! Do you mean to say that they would not have Irish as their first language/mother tongue unless they were from a Gealteacht? The parents of this child could easily be from a Gealteacht originally and later living elsewhere/or both be avid gaeilgeoirí who chose to continue speaking the language at home together with the result that their child first learnt Irish and later learnt English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyRozman

He probably means, that after they finished Gaelscoil, they would not use language anymore, unless they live in Gealteacht, where language is still spoken in everyday life.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinOheix
KevinOheix
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I'm French and learning in Brittany, Northwestern France.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
cdub4language
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I'm from the US, and have some Irish ancestry (one Irish great-grandparent). Even though no one in the rest of the family is really into Irish culture, since my early teens I've loved traditional Irish music and dance. I now play music regularly in sessions, go Irish set dancing on Friday nights (in France, nonetheless!), and occasionally work on sean-nos dancing and singing. A few years ago, I also caught the language learning bug, and became an active Duolingo user for other languages. As I've started trying to learn to sing Irish songs this past year, I really wanted to be able to pronounce them correctly and understand what I'm singing. I wasn't 100% certain I would like the language as much as I like the music - each person has their language preferences, for instance I love German but can't see why people think Italian is beautiful - so before really plunging into a heavy language mission, I thought I'd give it a try on Duolingo first. I tried it, I liked it as a language and not simply as a means to enjoy the music (although that will be great too!!), so here I am, with tree restarted to zero and ready to jump as soon as the new audio is released :-) So, for me, Irish is a) a way to connect to my heritage, b) a way to connect to the music that I love, and c) a continuation of my love of learning languages!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveLando
SteveLando
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My nationalities are Venetian-Piemontese-Lombard-Scanian-Dalcarlian. Currently I live in Sweden.

My agenda is to learn to read languages from all subgroups within the Indo-European spectra, I have long wished to start learning Irish (or some other Celtic language) but have never come around to do that intil the course appeard here on Duolingo, which I am grateful for.

I plan to learn enough so that I could read books and journals in the language, and maybe write som simple-language poems.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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Go raibh maith agat. You have the most interesting nationality I have ever heard of. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazzaru

jaysus boy sounds like you've been conceive in an orgy ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MoChuisleMoChroi
MoChuisleMoChroi
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I am American, I live in America, I have never been to Ireland, and I don't know if I ever will go there.

My Grandmother is from Ireland. I'm not "Irish", but I'm pretty happy some of my roots are there and the language is beautiful, so I enjoy studying it for the sake of study.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aindriu80
aindriu80
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I'm learning Irish in Ireland, my country of birth. I did learn it at school but felt it wasn't really taught properly and would like to speak/understand/read more. I enjoy it :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazzaru

I like to hear this kind of motivation well done, inspiring for irish people I tell ya ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tobecontinued..
tobecontinued..
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I'm an American with a great-great-great Irish grandfather. I always thought the Irish language sounded beautiful, but I wasn't very interested in learning it until I began work on a Russian phonology project. I am intrigued by the palatalized/non-palatalized consonant dichotomy that Russian and Irish have in common!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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I am intrigued by the palatalized/non-palatalized consonant dichotomy that Russian and Irish have in common!

I'm not familiar with what that dichotomy is exactly, but I noticed that traditional Irish sean-nós singing, or certain types of it at least, bear a striking resemblance to some traditional Russian singing. It's possible that the singing wasn't in Russian, but it was certainly from modern Russia.

The type of sean nós was the kind a bean chaointe or "keening woman" would sing.

This isn't exactly the kind I mean, but it's the closest I could find.

Caoineadh na marbh

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tobecontinued..
tobecontinued..
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Cool! I will check out the singing. And maybe I should have said "slender and broad" consonants instead of "palatalized and non-palatalized." Russian has the same thing, but calls their consonants "soft and hard."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

It's not exactly the same as Russian, Russian has palatalised/non-palatalised, Irish has palatalised/velarised.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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Táim i mo chónaí i nGaillimh, ach is ó Sasana mé ó dhúchais. B'as Éirinn tuismitheóirí mo mháthar. Thosaigh mé ag foghlaim Gaeilge nach mór fiche bliain ó shin ag ranganna oíche i Londain, mar bhí suim agam sa teanga agus i gceol traidisiúnta na hÉireann, agus bhí mé ag smaoineamh ar bogadh sall – agus rinne mé i 2001. Tá Gaeilge líofa ag mo bhean agus ag iomaí cara againn, agus úsáidim an cúrsa le haghaidh cleachtaidh laethúla.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heathermagoo
heathermagooPlus
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Temporarily AWOL. But totally waiting for Irish Tree 2.0! I wouldn't have ever known about wonderful Gaelige without the Duolingo course (not to mention Iarla Ó Lionáird). Many thanks!!

I'm currently masquerading as a college student on the West Coast (USA). My main area of interest is Sufi poets, but if I ever do dabble in Irish academically, I'll stick with the Irish diaspora (23andme says I'm 53% Irish/British, so I'm sure I can rustle up a respectable number of authentic Irish ancestors). I could spin a great yarn about Ella Young, who occupied the James D. Phelan Chair in Irish Myth and Lore in Berkeley for nearly 10 years in the 1920s-30s.

I'm sure you'll kill it with your paper. Ádh mór ort!

Edit: Just read the paper. Great job. Chock full of hard data, as well as anecdotes. And I have really appreciated hearing more about all the people taking advantage of the Irish course. I'd never heard the term PADDYWHACKERY before, but I did just see it modeled in Ballykissangel, "In the Can," a funny episode from a 1990's TV series about an Irish village making a film to attract tourists from the US. :D :D :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHappyHippo

I can't find that episode online right now, but I remember it from years ago. A man dressed as a leprechaun riding around on donkey. But some more nuanced material, as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wenna_Thor
Wenna_Thor
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I am learning Irish but I live in Michigan. Looking to move to Ireland (Dublin area or western Ireland) with my wife. I am doing the course because I am of Irish descent and would love to be able to speak it when I move there. I studied in Ireland in 2008 and picked up a bit and fell in love with it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bummble_Bri

I am Canadian. Like a number of others here, I have some distant Irish heritage. Added to that, my undergraduate degree was in linguistics.When I had license to choose the language I worked with, I often picked Irish (and Welsh) because of my heritage originally, but I became increasingly interested academically in aspects of the language, structural and social. Because of that, when my family suggested a trip to Ireland in the last year, I suggested we spend a day or two in gaeltacht regions. I fell more deeply in love with the language at that time and, well, here I am.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Nice. Which Gaeltacht did you visit?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bummble_Bri

In and around Connemara and Galway. Far too short, hoping to be back one day!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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You're welcome back here any time :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bummble_Bri

You are too kind :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huffdogg

I'm a citizen of the United States (residing not far from Notre Dame, actually) of mostly Irish descent. I have always been fascinated by Irish culture, felt extremely drawn to my Irish heritage, and have wanted for several years to try to move my family to Ireland, even if only temporarily, if I could find work there. I studied several languages in high school and have always enjoyed the study of languages, and absolutely love the musical quality of the Irish language. I find it to be a fairly easy language to learn so far, and I'm also trying to stay on top of it in an attempt to encourage my daughters to use Duolingo for one of the many languages it offers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caroeden

I'm in the US (washington) and I'm American (i have some irish, but not enough to call myself irish american. or german american, or french american. :) )

my main reason is "why not?" i took french, german, and spanish in high school and college, and I wanted something different. I'm refreshing my french at the same time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mlmcc93

I'm from the US (DC area), and have always had a love for my Irish ancestry. A few of my ancestors secretly taught Irish during the 1700s, and I thought this would be a unique way to connect with my ancestry while simultaneously diving deeper into modern Irish culture. I'm also interested in the study of sean-nós singing, and I feel that if I want to have any grasp of that art form, I need to know the language. Lastly, when I started this course, I had just submitted an application to study over this past summer in Galway, so it was a productive way to channel my excitement for that. Not that this is totally related, but I was excepted to that program, and boy, it was quite funny to see the extremely varied reactions (mostly positive) of locals when I'd start conversing with them in Irish!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487
Aria487
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I'm Iranian, Guilan province. I speak Persian as mother tongue, know a little Arabic and am fluent in Canadian and American English. I'm interested in any language -except one-, but Irish is kind of different. I can remember three reasons:

1 Irish music! Enya and Moya Brennan especially.

2 It's different and difficult to learn Irish, it's not like Iran (or the internet) is teeming with learning materials! I could choose French for example, with a lot more resources and dictionaries, but I like the challenge.

3 Artemis Fowl series had me curious about Ireland some years ago, so when I had the chance I jumped right into the country!

Hope it helps you.

p.s. I think languages should be referred to as "she" or "he", that way Irish would be a she.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I'm curious - did you read Artemis Fowl in English or in some other language? (I know that it was translated for a number of other markets).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487
Aria487
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Read it in Persian, translated by Sheida Ranjbar and published by Ofoq publication. I'm also planning to buy them in English, If Amazon.com frees Iran from sanctions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I had a funny feeling that you might say that! I had no idea that the Artemis Fowl books were available in Persian, but somehow it doesn't surprise me! I bought a copy in Portuguese as a gift for the daughter of a colleague who hosted me on a business trip to São Paulo a number of years ago, so I was aware of their popularity in translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tobosaur

I am Croatian living in Zagreb and I love Ireland, Irish people, Irish culture and Irish language. It was something exotic to me. I am trying to convince my Irish friends to value their own language and to be proud of it and I try to persuade them to learn and preserve it. It is their heritage and it must not be forgotten (because I see some EU documents that get translated to all official language but not in Irish) ... I think that is kind of sad. Somebody not so long time ago tried to take part of my culture .. and I know what it means...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

I'm from Co. Armagh, n Ireland and I began learning Irish a couple of years ago primarily out of curiosity surrounding local place names. I find that Duolingo compliments my night classes nicely. Due to partition and educational segregation in Northern Ireland I hadn't really been exposed much to the language and always felt I had missed out on an important part of our heritage. I always thought the language to be an innocent victim of our political problems and sadly to this day there remains political opposition and even hostility towards Irish in the North. Labhair í agus mairfidh sí.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katkonway
katkonwayPlus
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Hello, I am from Halifax, Nova Scotia. My mother's people came from Scotland and settled in Cape Breton. My grandmother spoke Scottish Gaelic but stopped as her kids got older. She taught me only a few words. There is a lot of interest in heritage languages in Canada and there is a Gaelic College in Cape Breton. Some schools are offering Gaelic and Mi'kmaq (our first nation's language) in addition to French and English. My father's people came from Ireland although I don't remember hearing the language. We do have a thriving Irish pub culture in Halifax, lots of music and food. We celebrate Saint Patrick's Day, although it is not a stat holiday. My son is enrolled at Saint Mary's University and is taking an Irish history course as an elective and he is enjoying it very much. SMU offers an Irish Studies program and he said on the week-end that he was thinking of taking the summer language exchange with the university in Galway. When I retire, very soon, I may take the Irish courses offered here before making a trip to Ireland. My parents were stationed in Germany when I was a child and I think that my interest in languages began there. I studied French in university because we are a bilingual country, Gaelic was not offered then. I also studied German, Latin, Russian and Old English. I learned a lot more German when my husband was stationed in Baden. I am using Duolingo to practice German, Spanish, French and learn some Irish. When I finish the tree, I will add Russian and Persian. I am a Baha'i and would like to learn some Persian to be able to read some of the posts on Facebook.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/winchelsea
winchelsea
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I'm English and learning in England. One reason I'm learning Irish is that I love all languages and want to become a polyglot at some time in my life. Irish is available, so I grabbed it (that's one of the great things that Duolingo makes possible!) I teach linguistics and English grammar, so learning 'about' languages is important to me, even if I never become fluent in most of them. I was very pleased though to add Irish (and Welsh) to the list because they are home languages of my culture and I am glad of the opportunity to help preserve them and expand their use.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdMac40
AdMac40
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Irishman from the north of the country here. Didn't do it in primary school, had a pretty horrendous experience of it at secondary level. Always wanted to learn it, found it pretty embarrassing when abroad when I was asked about it and could say little more than hello thanks and a couple of lines from prayers. Really started getting into it a year ago through duolingo and now a local conversational class. The language belongs to everyone and it's great to see both communities getting involved with it. It's a beautiful and rich language and I hope it continues to grow, its certainly increasing in popularity and usage in the north of the country.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daly.Kevin
Daly.Kevin
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I'm a New Zealander, and I'm learning because I see it as part of my heritage - my Irish great-grandparents were still Irish speakers (but not monolingual) before they came to this country in the late 19th century.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Very interesting that you even know they were speakers. Any idea where from?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daly.Kevin
Daly.Kevin
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For my father's family it was remembered, but what confirmed it was when my sister got hold of household census records. On my mother's side, my mother remembered her grandmother always being eager to meet visitors from Ireland that she could speak Irish with.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daly.Kevin
Daly.Kevin
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I forgot to answer the where from - for my father's family, Mungret just outside of Limerick. I was actually surprised to learn how long knowledge of Irish persisted in the countryside around Limerick.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazzaru

I am french learning gaeilge between Paris (france) and Malaga (spain), I travel a lot. I have 2 irish cailíní from Cork my partner is irish too and we lived in Ireland, so for me Ireland is family. I am bilingual english/french and some spanish (not fluent). My reasons to take the course are that gaeilge needs to be spoken, I do it for me and my family. My partner is learning spanish on duolingo but since she saw me progressing in gaeilge she wants to get back in to it that's great. we live in an international community in spain where we have swedish japanese deutch german irish, italian, spanish and english families. All our kids are bilinguals from birth. So mixity of languages is natural for us, even if english is the dominant one we are all expose to different ways to speak and express our thoughts. I like the sound of swedish and japanese but when I hear irish my heart wants to speak it back ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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I'm from England and like many English people I'm of partly Irish descent, so on the one hand I'm learning Irish for family history reasons. On the other hand, I've always loved languages anyway (my degrees are in the Romance Languages) and it's fantastic to have the chance to learn a language which isn't spoken by very many people, and help increase the number of speakers. I'm so happy that Duolingo was set up, as, being a former language teacher myself, I've seen how expensive it can be to study languages following the traditional routes (private tutors, language courses abroad etc). Of all the languages I'm currently studying, I actually find Irish the most difficult (well, probably together with Turkish) but it's fascinating and beautiful, and I do hope to go and visit Ireland some time soon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tineke79400
Tineke79400
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I am from the Netherlands and live there and one of my favourite writers is Flann O'Brien. So it has always been a dream of mine to read An Beal Bocht as he wrote it, in Gaelic. I tried an Irish course years ago, but these old cassette tapes were not so inspiring. My son introduced us to Duolingo and my husband started with Spanish. I thought it would be fun to do the same language, but once that tree was golden so rapidly, I realised my dream could become true.....but after the first lessons.... I am not so sure it can, but it is so much fun to see the construction of the sentences and try to figure it all out (not succeeding, so far..). I do miss the abundance of audio like Spanish has. I ordered the book anyway, it will arrive today. Succes with your paper!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhaktoryn
Rhaktoryn
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I'm taking the course. I'm A native English speaker from the USA, and am obsessed with languages. I'm African American, but adopted by two parents of Irish (and others) descent. My father knows Gaelic already, and I wished to learn as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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My father knows Gaelic already

That's cool. That's great that you can practice it a bit without having to come to Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olafurpatrick

I'm Icelandic-Irish, and have wanted to get a grasp of how Irish "works", so to speak, in terms of grammar and sentence structure, and to acquire a basic vocabulary. The Duolingo course seems ideally suited to that, as I've been using it to maintain my secondary school German, French, and Nordic language skills, so I know the concept works.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leonanfear

I don't know if it is too late or not. I am Irish but have been away from Ireland since a young age. Now leaving in Japan. Always wanted to learn Irish (own culture) but never found the time or the right tool for it. So when duo lingo came out, started to learn Irish. Very happy with it. Good luck with your paper :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/STEEZY-DEO

I'm in County Louth, Ireland, I'm from the Republic Of Congo and I'm fluent in French and English. I mostly do French and Spanish on Duolingo but I'm using Irish to help me with Irish for my Junior Cert. I'm absolutely terrible at Irish but I can see how I'll progress in the future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Howya, do you know if Duolingo is used much by secondary school pupils?

Strikes me as something that would be a great match, since learning Irish is not the easiest when you live away from an area that people speaking it as a native language...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tojo65
Tojo65
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I'm british but have lived in Germany for almost 25 years. For a long time I have loved to listen to Irish (whether spoken or sung) & wanted to learn the language but never found the right method. I also have Irish ancestry (County Carlow) so that was another reason. Duolingo isn't perfect but it is certainly better than learning from a book (for me at least).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan854540

I'm in the United States (Kentucky) and decided to learn Irish after visiting Ireland last year on vacation. I fell in love with the country and its language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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early 20's- In Illinois, first gen American parents (dad) Irish born in County Clare, Ireland (mum) Cornwall or Plymouth, England :) want to connect to heritage/ancestral language in the hopes its not lost

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Great! Did you know that County Clare had its own dialect of Irish? There's a book by Seóirse Mac Clúin about it, entitled Caint an Chláir, which was published in 1940.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Wow thanks for the info I thought the dialects were only Muenster and Connaught - is the dialect a spelling dialect as well or just in the accent ? Here: is a Irish youtube vlogger who vlogs in Irish which I have rarely seen on youtube :) https://www.youtube.com/user/all2sp

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Written Irish was standardized in the mid-20th Century. An Caighdeán Oifigiúil specifies the standard grammar and spelling rules. There are still some dialect variations recognized within the standard, but for the most part these are fairly minor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fern315197

I am in the U. S. (Minnesota) , born and raised in N. Y. C. and am deep into genealogy, specifically my Irish connections. Like others my goal is to learn the Townlands of origin. After years of hunting I found my g-grandfather's Townland of Legaginny, Parish of Ballintemple, County Cavan!!!! Yahoo!!! The hunt continues for my Mackan (McCann) and Janes lineages. I am interested in all things Irish: history, (recent and pre-history) culture, language, music, archeological sites, etc. I am interested in learning Irish for the fun of it. I am also studying with a class and while there is no overlap with Duolingo, I find it helpful and it keeps me engaged daily. Heading for western Ireland this Spring and am looking forward to being in a Gaeltacht region!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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For what it’s worth, here’s what The Surnames of Ireland has to say about the Mac Cann surname:

Mac Cann Mac Cana (cano, wolf cub; the form Mac Anna is incorrect). A leading sept in Clanbrassil.

The book’s map shows the location of the sept as having been in northern Armagh (roughly around modern Portadown) before the Nine Years’ War.

It has no entry for the Janes surname (but has entries for the James and Jones surnames).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fern315197

Go raibh maith agat! I appreciate your taking the time to look for me!!! My book doesn't have the map, great info!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It should be noted that eDIL treats cano as a variant spelling of cana, and that cana has an additional possible meaning other than “wolf cub”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fern315197

I was not aware of the eDIL, so thanks for that reference. I just spent some time lost in medieval Irish! Great!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fern315197

Go raibh maith agat to you too!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

I'm from Portadown myself and McCann remains a very common surname in the town. Earlier names for the neighbouring town of Lurgan were: Lorgain Chlann Bhreasail and Lorgain Bhaile Mhic Cana so connections there with both McCann and Clanbrassil. Interesting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The original of the book’s map was hand-drawn, and for placenames and boundaries it only shows those of the traditional counties; the extent of a sept is indicated by the size and spacing of surnames on the map. The McCann surname undoubtedly reaches Lurgan (and Craigavon). On the southern shore of Lough Neagh is (O) Keelaghan, and to the south of McCann is (Mac) Sherry, then (O) Heran.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fern315197

Wow, I'll have to do a search for a copy of that map online. I'll also be in Ireland in April on a non-research trip with friends, I might have to add some time for archival research, as my list grows. Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cchase007
cchase007
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I'm a native midwesterner, currently studying Irish in Minnesota. Irish is one of the components of my thoroughly mixed ancestry, but that isn't much of a factor in studying it. I am interested more because Irish mythology and themes often show up in the fantasy and urban fantasy I read and because I like studying languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Toretha

I'm in the US, and studied briefly in Ireland. If it was at all possible, I'd like to be a barrister there, which requires a test in Irish. Although I think it's highly unlikely to be a possible life choice for me (barristers being self employed making it a rather chancy profession to base immigration on), it's certainly never going to be possible unless I can pass that test.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willmcc
willmcc
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Living in the US but born in Northern Ireland, I recently got Irish citizenship (Republic) and I felt that I owed my ancestors some exposure to the Irish Language. I am not planning to speak it, but I would like to complete at least one book in Irish: "An Béal Bocht" is now sitting conspicuously on my "to-read" shelf.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ke908
ke908
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I live in London, and I downloaded Duolingo to brush up on my French, but thought I'd also give Irish a try, because my boyfriend is from Galway, and I wanted to impress him with a few phrases. Since I started, I've begun to really enjoy learning Irish. I find the grammatical complexities very fascinating and challenging, and as someone who doesn't have a strong interest in Irish culture, it's enabling me to appreciate its richness well beyond Enya and Westlife. I also like the novelty value of learning the language - it's a bit like learning Klingon, because you know so few people speak it on a daily basis!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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beyond Enya and Westlife

Oh dear...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
cdub4language
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I believe discovering enya as a (pre?)teen was what eventually led me to pick up more traditional music... I totally support enya as a gateway drug to Irish culture ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

And Westlife?

:-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
cdub4language
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Never heard of them until now, though it sounds like something my mother would have also liked to have had in her CD stash I was raiding at age 12... Thank goodness she had some traditional mixes handy for St Patrick's day too ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
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I am Polish, living in Poland and with no intention to move. I am an computer engineer who loves linguistics, and I also like Ireland and always wanting to be able to understand Irish language, its literature and songs. I had tried to learn Irish for a few years, but did not have enough motivation to keep learning. Since I met Duolingo it changed a little bit, as it does a great job in keeping me motivated to keep learning.

Also, at some point, I’d like to learn Classical Gaelic (aka Early Modern Irish), at least passively, as well as modern Scottish Gaelic, and I believe that knowing Irish dialects will help me with that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeirdreYouell

I am Irish, living in the middle east for 9 years and spent most of my adult life outside of Ireland. Now I am moving back in June. My husband is English and none of my 4 children know Irish from growing up abroad. I'm encouraging the children to learn languages and 2 of them do an Irish class once a fortnight so i'm brushing up my own for the move back and to start using it around the house so it rubs off on my children. They are also signed up for Spanish, which they learn at school and my grown up daughter is using the German course to communicate with her German boyfriend. I wish there was an Arabic course for my 2 youngest who can read and write in Arabic at basic level. I think the Irish course would be very hard for complete beginners.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karomykaromy

I live in Yorkshire, England. My mum is from Yorkshire and my dad is from Glasgow, and I have Irish ancestry on both sides of my family, with a strong Irish identity on the Glasgow side. My partner is from County Down but lives in England now. I have always loved folk history, culture, language and literature. I sing and play music, and I wanted to learn Irish because 1) It seemed to be a beautiful and poetic language and I liked the way the sounds feel different in your mouth to other languages 2) I would like to honour and share in the history of this language which is a neighbouring language but one which has been oppressed and almost lost 3) It's challenging and interesting to learn. Thank you very much to the team that created this course, I'm really enjoying it. Go raibh maith agaibh uilig X

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kekkonen
Kekkonen
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I am in Singapore. I sing Irish songs (and songs of other languages that I have heard from other places) in the shower and want to know what exactly it is that I am singing about. A friend who came back from Dublin brought back a book written in Irish and I thought it would be a good motivation to learn the language as well as a hilarious gift

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deirdriu9

I'm in the U.S. and have Irish heritage. I've been interested in learning Irish and have been collecting instructional books and other materials for a long time, but Duo sparked my first real sustained effort to learn.
I have general interest in languages and learning in general, and specifically in Irish culture. I like the idea of helping others to learn someday and having a part in keeping the language alive. I'm studying first to pass the TEG A1, and plan to someday attend Oideas Gael. I'd like to become fluent enough to be able to read in Irish and appreciate the nuance of the language rather than just struggle to decode it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsune1977
kitsune1977
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i'm a brazilian, living in brazil and studying irish 'cause i'm very curious and i love their music.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onlycookie
onlycookie
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German native and national, learning Irish on the English language based duolingo in Australia. I don't mind, as my English is pretty good, but am a tad sad for speakers of other languages. If it helps, I find Irish the one language that is challenging among the three. Swedish is like a hippy-mix of English and German for me, so easy to get my head around, I already speak French and had Latin in school, so Spanish is a breeze so far (I also have previous knowledge, but nothing coordinated). Irish's grammar is making my brain flexible (read: I'm confused), the pronunciation could deal with a guide or something but it is COOL. Why I learn it? I like the idea and the sound of it, it is different to both others (Spanish and Swedish) to not confuse them and apparently it's similar enough to Scottish Gaelic to understand each other-ish so I could use it in both areas potentially - I was inspired by 'Outlander' and a friend who loves the music and travels there often *haha Whether I will have the time in the future to keep it up is a different story, but right now I make the time and enjoy it. Good luck with the paper!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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If you’re familiar with the International Phonetic Alphabet, you could use the Wikipedia article on Irish orthography as a guide to pronunciation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onlycookie
onlycookie
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I'll give that a go :-) Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RossanoAlicia

I am an undergraduate student in Louisiana, where I was born and have lived my whole life. I have enjoyed language learning for a very long time, and am even currently minoring in Classics. Since I started high school, I have been studying Italian, which I am now more or less fluent in. I started with that language on this site so that I would not lose any skills I had gained while I am unable to find real-world interaction. There is some Irish on my mother's side of the family, though she is predominantly German. I'm also an animation nerd, and I have a great love for the films of Tom Moore (Secret of Kells and Song of the Sea). I especially enjoy the mythology of his stories, and I found it particularly interesting that he does so often use the Irish language throughout his films. I guess this is what really lead me to become involved with the Irish language alongside Italian and the Classic languages. Mostly, I suppose its just to add to my repertoire, if nothing else

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aquawyrm

I'm learning in the United States (and, actually, have never been outside the country). I don't have any Irish heritage, and neither does anyone that I know. Honestly, I'm learning it because I think that it's pretty, and because Ireland has a rich mythology (which interests me), and which I would like to learn more about (and knowing the original language can't hurt with that).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarik777

Is mise John Peter. I live one hour to the northwest of Chicago, not far from the Wisconsin state line. I do not have any Irish heritage, but have long been interested in Ireland's history and culture. I am interested in the old Irish storytelling and legends. I am also interested in the survival of Irish as a language. My ancestry is Spanish and German and English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I just saw this notice about a Deireadh Seachtaine Gaeilge in Milwaukee on March 4th.

http://www.daltai.com/events/915/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/denkim
denkim
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I've always lived in England, but my paternal grandparents were from County Cork (Kilmichael and Blarney) and I've now proudly acquired my Irish citizenship and passport. I have long been interested in Irish and its influence on the English spoken in Ireland, but am only now - at long last - doing something about learning the language itself with the help of Duolingo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vrindi108

I'm learning in the United States. I actually studied Irish in graduate school, but struggled with the way it was taught.

I've always been fascinated with the language, and I believe it's the best language for poetry. I can't say why exactly I'm studying this language instead of Spanish (which is spoken a lot in my area) or French (which I studied in high school), but Irish has captivated me. I'll be visiting Ireland for the first time this summer, and we'll be staying in the Gaeltacht, and I'm really looking forward to practicing my baby Irish knowledge with the locals!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Cool. Enjoy your trip. Which Gaeltacht?

I'm not sure about it being the best language for poetry... :)

You say you struggled with the way it was taught... but I think it's a very difficult language to pick up without immersion and the relative lack of good learning aids online, especially before Duolingo came along.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vrindi108

We haven't confirmed for sure yet, but It looks like we'll be hanging around Galway, the Aran Islands, and the whole southwest area.

I think my issue with learning any language I've studied is that it's usually taught from a grammatical perspective, and although I have two degrees in English, all my grammar knowledge is purely intuitive now. I honestly don't know the grammar rules of my own language, so I can't seem to connect to another language that way. I've had better luck with Duolingo because the grammar isn't the main focus. It seems like a more natural way to learn a language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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I suggest seeing as much of the western seaboard as possible, but if the Irish language interests you, I certainly recommend Connemara in Galway, as it has the largest Gaeltacht.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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I'm doing the course, although I've slowed down now. I grew up in Ireland, did Irish at school of course, went to the Gaeltacht in An Muirioch, Kerry, and then forgot all about Irish. Living in Australia, I began to think about studying it again, and now I'm back in Ireland just for a year I do Irish conversation here in Dublin once a week, and have been doing the Irish course in Duolingo since it started.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageSucker

Hello there! I am a native English speaker from the United Kingdom and I have Irish heritage and am wanting to know more about the language spoken in some parts of Ireland. Ireland is where I take most of my holidays and would be nice to be able to understand some Irish words and phrases also!

Very best of luck with your paper :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarik777

I would like to add to my previous comment, that I am of Mexican (Spanish) and German and English heritage, and a heritage speaker of Spanish, unlike a native speaker who grows up surrounded by the language, I learned Spanish as a second language from my mother, who is considered Spanish and Basque, unlike the Mestizo (hybrid of indigenous Mexican and Spanish). My mother and father both had a high regard for the Irish people and culture and nation. My mother told me about Irish participation in the Mexican revolution. I'll have to brush up on that part of history. She also told me about the "Black Irish" whose ancestry, it is legend, came from Spanish who reached the shores of Ireland after surviving the sinking of the Spanish flotilla in 1588 or thereabouts.

Again, I would like to thank duolingo for giving us the opportunity to learn Irish and be able to actually practice and discuss it. A gor a maith agat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jadewilloughby00

I am living in Ireland and learning to help with my junior cert! I have high intentions of being a primary school teacher too, and fluency in Irish is needed, so why not start early!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/themissgrace

I'm an American looking to pick up some more languages and deeply interested in lesser known European languages. I also have some sort of ridiculous fantasy of being able to read the Irish mythological epics in the original language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niamhwitch
niamhwitch
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I live close to Boston in the US, though I am originally from Southern California. I'm an American with Scottish and Irish ancestry on my dad's side (mostly Scottish), and always wanted to learn the Celtic languages, particularly Scottish Gaelic, but also Irish and Welsh (though, I have no known Welsh ancestry). If Duo had a Scottish Gaelic course, I'd take that in an instant. Looking forward to starting the Welsh course soon. Taking the Irish course here at Duo has really boosted my love and interest in my Irish heritage... and the culture of Ireland. Someday, my husband and I plan to take a second honeymoon to Scotland and Ireland. :-)

Anyway, I guess I'm mostly interested in learning the languages of my ancestral heritage-- Scottish, Irish, Hungarian (mom's side), etc. -- and Celtic languages in general.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArmanSadeghi

Hi there, I have just started Swedish and a number of other languages only to fulfill my curiosity toward different languages now that Im finally able to find some free time in my schedule. I am from Iran and I am Iranian. Aha one more thing a possible reason for keeping on learning Swedish could be studying linguistics there if you know what I mean ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lorna801257
lorna801257Plus
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Living in England. Born Ireland, to English parents, on UK side of border with Donegal. Left unexpectedly age 15 having little clue about Irish language and very superficial appreciation of indigenous Irish culture except what I had grasped subliminally. Found England weird when I got here! Homesick.

At 14 had liked learning German, learned to like French, as student volunteer taught ESOL to Vietnamese boat people as arrived in England. Took up a term of Dutch while on year abroad in Germany as I began to understand about linguistic domination, colonialism, genocide from French/German literature degree. Loved Samuel Beckett. Trained to teach drama....read Yeats, Synge & Co.

Also learnt ever more about dyslexia in adopted members of my family which sensitised me to exclusion. Took up BSL. Caring duties kept me from Ireland for decades. Felt it vital to make effort to acquire phrases of courtesy in Punjabi, etc. (Most common immigrant language here at one time). Vowed one day to take up Irish, but as closer to Wales at that time tried to learn Welsh from books. Little success with that! Once relieved by bereavement of caring duties, discovered an Irish course within 10 mins walk of my house. Struggled to cope with massive identity/culture/generational clashes within our little group. Learnt a lot, except how to put Irish together in head and speak. Duolingo has just given me the support of a great Personal Assistant: noticing what I need to work on next. (See Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development"). Now watching TG4 online I hear whole phrases not a jumble of words.

Motivation: access to the culture of my birthplace, and chance to reflect on mystifying experiences of youth. I know I am (way back) from a mix of Celtic & British as well as Saxon/Norse/Norman French. Goal: attend Pan Celtic festival in Derry. If Duolingo did Gàidhlig I would be doing that as well.

Grma ...for your research. Gabh mó leithscéal ...for the length.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abby041977
Abby041977
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I live in germany and i love languages. I started the irish course yesterday and some other languages too. Just try to refresh them like french or spain or to learn it completely new like irish (and hopefully hebrew soon too) :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/__fra___

I'm italian and currently living in Italy, I am learning irish because I like Ireland and I want to try to live there for a while. Also I really like this language and I don't want it to die, and to (try to) speak it is the only thing I can do now to make it live

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cinty423155

Hi I am learning Irish in Dublin to keep my daughter company who is learning it in Melbourne. Both of us failed to learn it in school! JK

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

I'm in and from Belfast, learning Irish (on this site and from regional Ulster Irish sources) because I am Irish and never had a chance to learn it, having attended an integrated school followed by a non-denominational grammar. I'm totally in favour of those modes of education--all schools need to be integrated--but I have a need for my language. I feel the integrated schools would do well to offer the language, since there's a resurgence of interest among the "Protestant" community (using that term loosely because many of us, on both sides of the community, are atheists or irreligious today).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginagillen
ginagillen
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That's interesting , I lived in Belfast area for 42 years and learned some Irish at the cluan Ard in Belfast. It gave me an interest although I don't expect to speak it anywhere. I enjoy yhe duolingo course

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zalask4

I'm French, living in France. I'm learning Irish just for the fun of it, because I've always been quite interested in Ireland and its culture. Now I am more and more tempted to visit Ireland and not only dream of doing it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anglea
Anglea
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I've joined the Irish course because I am automatically an Irish citizen by virtue of having an Irish parent, even though I was born in England. My Irish parent came from a Gaeltacht (official Irish-speaking area) and one day I'd like to visit there, or maybe even retire there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Nice. I was born in England also, but I am a child of Irish parents from the Gaeltacht. Shortly after I was born however, they returned home to Connemara, so Irish is my first language

I use Duolingo for French and to sample other languages, but I hang around here sometimes to help and see how the course is progressing. I did the Irish course frequently to test for bugs etc when it was in a less finished state.

Great to see such enthusiasm for the language here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ffirdafz
ffirdafz
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Dia daoibh! Is mise Firda, taim as Indineis. Ta an crainn agam, ach ta an Ghaeilge agam go bhriste go foill. (arck I am not sure how to say it , and sorry for the lack of fadas too _)

I first decided to learn Irish when I saw the course about to be released in beta stage (along with Russian, which btw took waaaay longer to release :p). I meant to take Irish on Duo just for the pleasure of learning new language (while also waiting for Russian to be released :p), putting all practical matters aside (like whether if I would ever speak this language anyway and any other questions like that). Unlike my interests in other foreign languages I learn, I learn Irish purely for linguistic interest (compared to my interest in culture related to other languages I learn, I have little interest in Irish culture prior to learning this language on Duo, aside from very faint interest on Irish music (oops)), and I was also interested to learn that its grammar is so different from the grammar of any other European language (this is the second non-SVO language I learn, the first was Japanese, and also the first non-SVO European language I learn). With all that, I set out learning Irish with this Duo course.

As I went through this course I wondered whether if it is truly worth it for me, seeing that I might never have the chance to speak it at all (like using it to speak with other Gaelgoiri I meet, whether it be fellow learner or even a native speaker direach as an ngaeltacht), and culturally speaking I have no tie at all to Ireland and its culture, so wouldn't it make more sense if I learn other languages that have culturally closer tie^ (say, other Asian language), or to learn other languages more widely used (say, Chinese^^ or Spanish, pragmatically speaking they seem to be more useful, no? You can't ignore the fact about the number of the speakers :( , and at this point I also got to think that even learning Russian seems to make more sense to me than learning Irish :/ ), but that didn't stop me finishing the course ;). As I wrote above I have finished the Irish tree, albeit still fairly broken at it, only managed to understand and create few simple sentences (anything slightly more complicated than that is rather out of my grasp :( ), and my Irish listening skill is sadly close to zero :( (partly my fault, and partly on the lack of proper^^^ Irish resources that I can find). I try however to maintain my knowledge of this language (and therefore I am also glad to hear that Irish tree 2.0 is on the way, to be released this year :D). I still wish to use it as a fluent user too, although admittedly I've gotten lazier after I finished my tree.

If I could make it to do my graduate study in Europe, then I would make sure that I visit Ireland (perhaps its typical destination like Galway, although I actually had Donegal in my mind, particularly Sliabh Liag), and I would also make sure I speak Irish, even if it is just few words, a thank you at least ;) :').

^Yeah, it is a rather vague parameter, seeing that Asia as a whole continent is culturally diverse, meaning one culture can actually very different from another culture. What I mean is, in general terms Asian culture are broadly quite similar (and so it would be rather easier in learning the languages, especially in the part that is heavily influenced by the cultural context).

^^I've learned Chinese, gave up on the way, know only several words, don't expect me to be able to have some daily conversations :').

^^^Many people in the course said that the pronunciation in the course is faulty, and when I searched for videos as Gaeilge in youtube (like, say, Doona's an bon bon carr XD), people in the comments said that the pronunciation (in the song sung) is faulty, in short almost whenever I searched for Irish resources for improving my listening skills, the resources I found are almost faulty, that disheartened me. I know, I should try to move past that >_< .

PS: Comment to me if you're also an Asian learning Irish here in Duo, I'd like to know you X)

Go n-eiri leis bhur oibri!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robert0199

Try the Live radio station on the internet for some Irish songs. The web site is liveirish.com. There is a really beautiful rendition of Mo Ghile Mear on the site which is done by some students. Very different from the commercial versions by the Chieftans or some of the other commercial groups. The station is also on www.internet-radio.com/stations/celtic/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acw447
acw447
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I'm American, learning in the US. My fiancé, son, and I are learning to better appreciate our heritage and be able to speak the language at home

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dquedenfeld16

I am learning in Philadelphia, and live here. I am of Irish descent. I started the course looking for a route to learn the language, which has always sounded beautiful and magical to me, a language which by birthright I should speak, the way that each nationality has their own language. I feel robbed of my own.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lillyisdoodlgod

i live in kentucky(united states) and i wanted to learn to speak irish because one of my friends recently moved back from ireland after 5 years there and now is only fluent in irish. we like to talk a lot but her english isn't very good, so i'm learning irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alice54_Maree3.

I live in Australia.I have been learning French and have finished the French Tree but just recently I decided to learn Irish as my daughter has been married to an Irishman for the past few years.I thought I might try to embrace a little of his culture.I have'nt got very far yet but do intend to pursue it more

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TygerC
TygerC
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I live in Finland and I'm a native Finnish speaker. I'm also fluent in Welsh. I'm taking the course because I like the Irish language, it's really beautiful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EavanM

I am in the US, my nationality is US, and I'm doing the course chiefly because I am Irish-American and want to master my heritage language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quiltaa
Quiltaa
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I am german, living in Berlin. I am addicted to learning languages and after a hiking trip on the Dingle Peninsula in 2014 Irish was the next language on my bucket list. I love to learn differnet languages, whether to use them or not, just to keep my brain busy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krazyceltickid

I'm an American, originally from New York but have lived in Boston & am currently in Texas. My family emigrated years ago, but has done a lot in an attempt to retain our roots. I've always been fascinated by Irish history & culture, and try to avoid the usual "American Plastic Paddy" designation. I also am a huge lover of languages, the more obscure the better! I currently speak four languages (including two forms of Sign Language) and when I was told by a friend about the Irish course I jumped on it! Since then I've slacked off, like some others I'm waiting for the new audio to launch (I don't want to reinforce any bad habits). I've been trying my best to convince my boss to send me to our Cork office, but so far no luck :(

Hope this helps, feel free to ask any questions that would help with your paper!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super-Svensk
Super-Svensk
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I am just a language enthusiast living in Wisconsin, USA! Irish seemed like a fun challenge to learn, so I started the course and fell in love with its complexity!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I just saw this notice about a Deireadh Seachtaine Gaeilge in Milwaukee on March 4th.

http://www.daltai.com/events/915/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super-Svensk
Super-Svensk
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I'll look into it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j8enny56
j8enny56
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I am in England-Lincolnshire and am trying the Irish course because I had an Irish grandfather.I have been trying to research his forbears in County Waterford/Cork and some of the documents are in Gaelic (or Latin).Ihave also recently made contact with Irish speaking relatives in Eire and believe it would be nice to try to understand a little of their culture.I am keen on languages,having studied French,Latin and German at school,but am finding Irish very difficult to remember.I suppose I don't quite understand the grammar!Of course I am maybe struggling because I am now considerably older than when I began the other languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daiana-1602
Daiana-1602
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I am a native German and live in Germany. I have never been to Ireland but this is on the agenda when I will have finished the tree. I love the sound of this beautiful language that describes more than anything Ireland in itself. It is melodious and rough like the landscape with the green hills and steep cliffs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamiortooq

I live in Seattle, never been to Ireland. I'm Russian-American with no Irish heritage. I'm fluent in Russian, so I relate to the struggles of native Irish-English bilinguals who have a hard time finding a use for their language in their country but still want to keep it alive anyway.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marygbaker

I live in California and I'm American. I've been taking the Italian course because I learned some Italian ages ago, and the Duolingo course was a great way to get back into it. Having finished the Italian tree I wanted to try something new. A long time ago I spent a week in County Galway and it was maybe the only place I've been where people didn't automatically assume I was a tourist (maybe because I have red hair?). But I couldn't understand any of the language, and I thought it would be fun to try learning a bit of Irish, as I'd love to return sometime to Ireland. But I'm starting from a complete blank, and I'm not sure if I can learn from the course without having a little knowledge already. We'll see!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-oizys-

Italian based in Italy, learning Irish out of curiosity.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lg72xx
lg72xx
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I am learning in the US. I am a polyglot (English, French, Spanish, Russian, Mandarin.. and a very,very small smattering of Arabic -- side note: I wish Duolingo had an Arabic course !). Learned all the others in formal (i.e., classroom) courses, for use in my work. I am retired now, and decided to learn Irish because it is one of my ancestral languages (the others being Italian and German...so I know NONE of them !). While it is hard for many people to find a classroom course in Irish, I actually do have that option, as I am in the WashDC area, where it is taught at Catholic University of America. But this way is much less intimidating for someone of my age (58) who has been out of the classroom for so many years !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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I wouldn't feel intimidated. No reason to. You have as much if not more enthusiasm for it as anyone that will take the class.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeeksGSD
DeeksGSD
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I'm American (Midwesterner) and I'm learning Irish for the fun of it. We might have a touch of Irish blood, but we aren't sure. I actually started Irish because there wasn't a Welsh course available at the time, but I really like both languages now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/egleCZ
egleCZ
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I am in the Czech Republic and I started the Irish course for the simple reason that I was fascinated by the idea of learning a language which is spoken so little (and also Celts... do I need to say any more? :D ). However I took a break from the course to learn Norwegian instead and I have been waiting for the tree to be updated, as I found it not really well suited for a complete beginner

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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I'm was born and am now back living in Northern Ireland, its where I've spent most of my life. I started using Duolingo to refresh/improve my Spanish a year ago, but recently I discovered the Irish course and was amazed and proud to see its popularity on Duolingo (1.4M learners, and seventh in the list for English speakers, for a language with less than 100k native speakers!).

I learned Irish at school and took an O-level in it, but then lapsed over the years apart from occasional bouts of interest. It's around me in my culture, several cousins are fluent, it's in the trad music and dance scenes that I sometimes frequent, and of course there's the literature and history that it helps with. Occasionally I'm meet someone in a bar speaking irish with his friends and try and join in, but I'm too rusty. So I'll get through the tree from time to time as a break from my current preoccupations of Polish and Spanish.

I used to think Irish was hard to learn, but learning Polish has put that idea to bed lol.

I'm also curious to see the effect Duolingo will have in time on the number of fluent Irish speakers. I think its a real opportunity for a mini-resurgence of the language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
SandyBridgePlus
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I was born in the USA and am living there now. I started Irish for fun, as a break from studying German. I picked Irish because some of my ancestors came from Ireland, and I was curious. This is the first language on Duolingo where I did I not have at least a small previous exposure, so I'm finding it unusually hard going. I finally went and looked up some basics of grammar, which helped. With all my previous Duolingo languages I knew the basics of word order, pronunciation and grammar from other sources. It's been fun! I'll keep it up in the background.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chloe425

i am learning Irish,Spanish,french, and italion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TiercelJM
TiercelJM
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I'm in the US (New York). This is, I think, my fourth attempt at learning the language since I was a teenager, and the only one that's stuck in any way. So, I'm kind of doing it out of stubbornness, but also a) to have another language that most people don't, and b) because it makes my mom happy. Theoretically my family's Irish-American but whatever, I'm an American.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuliatko
yuliatko
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Hello, I am originally from Ukraine, living in Slovakia with my Irish boyfriend. I started learning Irish language as soon as I discovered this option on Duolingo. There are not that many native speakers of this beautiful language. I would like to preserve it and keep it alive as less people are using it nowadays.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaki.a
Elenaki.a
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I am from Australia and I'm learning the Irish because I'm fascinated with the language, it's unique structures and sounds and with the Irish culture.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pepethefrog246

I actually do have Irishmen in my heritige,Which is why I am learning Irish(and German for the same reasons)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patrickwilmes

I'm learning in the US, which is my country of origin. My greatgrandparents were Irish and they may have been Irish speakers. I'm doing the course because it is interactive and I can get endless practice (which seems to be the only way I can learn). I would love it if Duolingo added some passages for reading, listening to and answering comprehension questions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MKennedy6

I'm in the United States, California. I'm just learning for fun. I heard a family speaking it at a park and it was beautiful to listen to. I do hope sound will be added to more parts of the course. I'm grateful to the people who have worked to make this course available.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teletype1
teletype1
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Hi everyone, I'm a music professor in Georgia, USA. 6 of my 8 great grandparents were Irish, and I've always wanted to learn the language. I'm at the point in my career now where I have some extra time, and my goal is to be able to sing in Irish and hopefully go to Atlanta to play with the seisún crowd there. I've enjoyed Duolingo so far and thanks so much to all the contributors. The book and tape sets I bought over the years seem useless in comparison to the app. Great work all around!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K.Hogan
K.Hogan
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I am American (northeast/New England region), but a significant amount of my ancestry is from southern Ireland, and I have always been fascinated by the culture, history, and increasingly the language. I have spent a fair amount of time in Ireland, but would love to go back and try to spend time immersed in the areas that still speak the various Irish dialects. I partly started out of sheer curiosity, to be honest, but it has since become a vital part of a larger cultural self-education as I do more reading on Irish history and literature.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LudovicaTheGreat

I'm English, I live in Germany, and I'm learning Irish out of curiosity and as a break from working on my German. I wanted to start a language from the beginning, and chose Irish because I just like the look and sound of the language, and the structure. I have been to Ireland quite a bit, though not lately. I think there is only one Irish member of my family tree (born in the early nineteenth century) so I can't claim much of an Irish heritage though!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/auskjb
auskjb
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I'm taking the Irish course because I've always wanted to learn Celtic languages. I'm from the United States. Best of luck with your paper!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverDM999

i am 3?4 irish so i gave it a try.id there swiss italian because i am 1/4

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/y_s0_serious

I am learning in the US, where I am from. I am a teenager in high school and I started learning after I visited Ireland last year. I fell in love with the culture and the language, and I soon found Duolingo to help me learn. I can't practice every day, but I try to practice when I can. I hope to become fluent eventually, but I'm learning as a hobby for now

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maxelllite

I'm learning in the US (Iowa), I had a genealogy test done a couple years ago that says I'm close to half Irish and never met my father who would have been the one it came from. I'm never really thought of the US as home and have wanted to move to Ireland for unknown reasons (just felt right for some reason) for years before I did the test. After I found out I decided that I am really going to move over and try to get citizenship in the near(ish) future. I'm learning and doing the course because it makes me feel closer to family that I know I have but have never met, to a side of me that has felt missing for most of my life.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginagillen
ginagillen
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I am learning in England. I am English of Irish parentage and while living in Northern Ireland some years ago I had the chance to learn Irish . My reason for trying to learn was the fact that when my mother was at school in 1916 she was prevented from learning Irish by British soldiers going into the school and taking all the Irish books. It sounds far fetched at this distance but that is what she told me. I just decided to give it a go and got an O level in it. Now years later Duolingo has given me another chance to learn it although the pronunciation is very different to how I learnt it. I am just doing it for fun and am glad Duolingo introduced it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielFrazer1989

I'm an Irish descent American using it in NYC

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwasson
mwasson
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Irish-American from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, although like many Nth generation Irish-Americans I can't claim close cultural ties to Ireland. Mostly interested due to my ancestry, but I've long had a general interest in Irish and more broadly Celtic culture, language, and history.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tcgirl
tcgirl
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Dia Duit! Hello...I live in Oregon, USA, but started out in NJ years ago. I am of Irish/German/French descent, and love language. I started out with French in high school, added German, continued in college (Jr. year abroad in Tours, France). I taught ESL here in Oregon for a while and decided it would be good to learn Spanish, so I went back to college....I'm almost finished with my Spanish tree on Duo. I met an Irish woman here who was willing to start a few of us Irish novices with Irish, which lasted almost a year, but fizzled out. I'm back at it with Duo but it is SLOW GOING. Most especially because there is minimal audio with the lessons. So...I took advice from the discussion posts and signed up for a Liofa.eu course online, and I believe I may improve with it....if I can only pick a dialect to proceed in! Choices, choices....

So...short answer: heritage, lover of learning languages. Good luck with your paper.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizabethS746001
ElizabethS746001
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I am in the US, Ohio, to be exact. I am learning Irish, because I have always had a curiosity of the Irish language, since I am Irish through my Grandfather on my Mom's side. Irish is the 2nd language I am learning, I have been studying Hebrew, modern and Biblical for several years. So I thought i would give it a try. I hope to become fluent in it. Duolingo is very nice, in that it makes the learning fun, and makes it understandable. Well, except for some of the language rules, which would help to know, before trying to understand why spellings change, for no apparent reason. And it would be nice if there was more actual speaking of the Irish words, in the program, instead of just reading it. Anyone who knows Irish, knows the words are not necessarily spelled with the letters that you say. At least from an English perspective. LOL It is challenging, but I am enjoying learning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/William294923
William294923
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I've used it. I did have a couple of Irish lessons in Manchester many years ago but stopped when they closed down the centre and when I had an injury at work.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mauriah
Mauriah
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I'm learning in Canada. I'm of primarily Scots, English and Irish heritage. I'd started learning Irish years ago when I was going to university, with friends of like heritage. I love the Duolingo format, and I really like that I can learn Irish on it. Someday, I'd like to travel to Ireland, and I'd love to be able to actually use what I've learned there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mauriah
Mauriah
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Incidentally, it'd be great to see Scots Gaelic on here, too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simplicity_Lost

I'm learning Irish because I never understood how the written language corresponded to the spoken (caoimhe -> keeva) and, out of stubbornness, I decided to find out. I've no particular relationship with Ireland, just an interest in language in general. I live in the US and have no previous interest in Irish culture and no plans to travel there in the near future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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(caoimhe - keeva)

More like kwee-vah or kwee-veh sometimes, but it also depends on the region.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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I have the percentage of user for each country

Are you able to share that with us?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pluto17

I am an American. My great grandparents immigrated from Ireland. I dream of Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaHegarty
PatriciaHegarty
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I was born in Ireland, have lived in Canada for almost 30 years and enjoy playing Duolingo. I decided to try Irish after Spanish, Italian, German and French. Actually, I'm finding it quite difficult because of the noun changes from masculine, feminine, singular and plural, which we never learned (in my day) in school. All our learning was by rote and a swift belt of the book on the nearest part of your anatomy by the good nuns! Not so bad in high school. Helpful?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I don't particularly associate Irish with corporal punishment in school (no more than any other subject, anyway), but it came as a bit of a surprise when I started to do the Irish course on Duolingo to find out that Irish has genders. If I ever learned that in school, I had forgotten it, and it's not really the kind of thing that you forget!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarmanFutt

Hello! I am learning Irish because I have always loved the language. I am about 48% Irish, according to Ancestry.com, and live in Alabama. Good luck with your studies, and all the best to you. <3 :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clodagh44

I'm learning in England, and have lived in England all my life, but my dad is Irish and I adore Irish music so wanted to understand/ be able to pronounce the lyrics.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatBurkard
KatBurkard
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I'm in the NYC metro area in the US. I'm learning Irish because my grandmother was from Ireland and many of my great-aunts and -uncles, as well as my mother's cousins and their children, are still living over there. I always wanted to learn when my grandmother was alive, but because Irish was not commonly taught in elementary schools (it may even have been outlawed? Not sure--she was in Offaly), she never learned more than a few phrases. So I know she'd be proud to know I'm learning it for her.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rpling731
rpling731
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I'm learning in USA (California). I have Irish in my ancestry, also am a hobby linguist.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ulfsdottir

I'm in Northern California, and I'm of Scottish & English heritage, not Irish. I have been doing historical recreation (medieval, renaissance, and gold rush California) for 26 years as well as Scottish games, Celtic music festivals, renaissance faires, etc. I have been studying & researching Celtic mythology and folklore since I was in my teens, and I'm also a singer who performs Irish/ Scots/ English/ American traditional music at various events and sometimes gigs with friends. I can generally "fake" singing in the Irish or Gaelic by copying others because I have a good ear, but I wanted to finally start to learn Irish properly to really do the songs proper justice (and then also go do some studying of Gaelic [Gàidhlig] somewhere so I can get down the differences, as I know there are a fair few). :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilkenLingo
SilkenLingo
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I am from and live in Argentina (my mother tongue is Spanish) and I have Italian ancestry. I enrolled Duolingo in order to study French, but I've always been curious about "less popular" languages, especially slavic and celtic languages. Being a huge fan of all things English-Scottish-Irish-Welsh, I decided to try Irish. It's beautiful but a bit complex, so I'll rest while I finish the French course and then I'll start again. It's also an interesting experience because there is no Spanish-Irish course, so I'll have to take it in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hilarylynne08

I am taking the Irish course because I will be going to Ireland, England and Wales this summer. I wanted to learn a bit before I left. I may be American, but my heart belongs to the British Isles.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

A word of advice - don't refer to "the British Isles" when you're in Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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What then?

"These isles" might work, I suppose, if you are in Ireland, but what should you call them if you talk about "the islands of Ireland, Great Britain, and surrounding smaller islands such as Isle of Man and Isle of Wight" with an Irishman in, say, Australia?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I doubt that Hilary is planning to have in depth discussions about the geographic cluster that needs to explicitly include reference to the Isle of Man while visiting Ireland. If she wants to refer to both countries together, I've never had a conversation where "Ireland and Britain" or "Britain and Ireland" wasn't sufficient. If she's going to the trouble of learning Irish for her visit, it'd be silly not to take time to be aware of the English idioms that are different in Ireland while she's at it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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It's a geographical term. Nobody cares.

Britain or Great Britain would of course be another story.

Edit: 304 day streak... bloody hell!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

If nobody cared, the phrase would be used a lot more than it is. I would venture to say that most people in the Republic will avoid using the term themselves, unless they're engaged in an explicitly technical conversation (geography, geology, history), and "Ireland and Britain" is a far more widely used phrase, and entirely suitable for the OP's purposes.

As a quick check, a search of the Irish Times archive for the lat 20 years returns 532 hits for "British Isles", 4012 hits for "Britain and Ireland" and 3422 for "Ireland and Britain"

If she does talk about "the British Isles", most people will be polite enough to let it go, even if they dislike the term, but you can't rule out bumping into someone who'll take issue with it, and she would lose any brownie points she thought she'd gain by having the cúpla focal.

As for the streak, it's just one day at a time! There are people with 1,000 day streaks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarik777

How do you say in Gaelic, "It's beyond your control."?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Níl aon neart agat air seems to be the idiom used on foclóir.ie

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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Some small minority may get excited about it, but not enough to worry about. And there's a whole part of the island of Ireland where to refer to the islands as "The British Isles" would be accepted as the norm by the majority of people (Northern Ireland, making up a quarter to a third of the population of the island).

I use it as a shorthand way to refer to a region of Europe, especially when contrasting with other regions of Europe e.g. "...whereas in Scandanavia and the British Isles, because of climate, this would not be possible..."

I'm often socialising with people from outside "The British Isles" and I think they would find it overly pedantic of me to be politically correct to the point of naming the islands separately when a collective name exists.

If we're going to get political/historical about it, remember that the pre-Roman inhabitants of England and Wales, the "Britons" (as named by the Romans) were a Celtic tribe with close links with the Celtic tribes in Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Wow, you point out that there's a specifically different pattern of usage along political demarcation lines ("The British Isles" would be accepted as the norm by the majority of people (of) Northern Ireland) but then advise that someone ignore the neutral term "Britain and Ireland", and use the potentially problematic term "British Isles" instead.

You must have some very strange friends if they would find "Britain and Ireland" overly pedantic.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lorna801257
lorna801257Plus
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I am strange, I grant you, but I do not know Conor.raff... I was born in NI, in Derry. I live in England cos my parents were welcome guests/immigrants to the landmass of Four Cúige. I feel people living on that land mass have been finding elegant ways to move forward from painful history. I am happily "British" as I have English and Scottish and probably Welsh, Cornish, Cumbrian forbears. And Irish forbears mainly via Scotland, whose Scots were Irish anyway. I think we should geographically rename the Isles of which we speak the Celtic Isles. I know most of Europe had Celts, but we are the real island dwellers. I think it great that the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (despite the Germanic royals in the title), is accepted all around our co-operating isles. Yet, that is enough of a nod to our antiquated arrangements. Saxons, Angles and Danes/Norsemen, some via France, all get some mention in placenames, but the Celts were present first, at least as recorders of history. The Britishness of anywhere has been and will be a matter of changing political realities. British India remains in history. British Ireland was a fact, in a law which was unjust. We need to negotiate a geographical title we can all use. We need to let the youngsters of the future keep coming up with elegant solutions to resolve the mess (the overlords of ) my antecedents made.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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My friends are not at all strange! I resent the implication!

Many of them come from outside the British Isles, and most do not want to get involved in what must look like very petty squabbling to outsiders.

I prefer to use the term that is in wide usage in most of the English-speaking world, one that they have likely been taught, as it communicates better the concept that I want to convey. The term "Britain and Ireland" does not include the other islands.

I would use the "British Isles" especially when I'm referring to a group of regions of Europe. If I'm just talking about the British Isles then I could use "Britain and Ireland" at times, or "Ireland and Britain". But in a list of regions, I would definitely use the term British Isles.

You keep using your terms, and I will keep using the ones I use.

I would add that I have held both British and Irish passports and can see myself as either or both, its not a big issue. One thing I don't like to see is the politicizing of the Irish language.

I wanted to bring a sense of proportion to what seemed like undue scaremongering.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hilarylynne08

The "British Isles" is just what our trip was labeled as at my university. I personally know not to do that while in Ireland. I have done my research. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Hi Hilary,

This might inform and entertain you. It's more in reply to the people that replied to your comment, but it's you that will get the benefit of it.

The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

While he doesn't claim to be explaining anything about Ireland, he is wrong when he says that "Ireland is a geographical and not a political term" (at 1:40) and "the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom are members of the EU" at 1:55 - the EU's own list of it's members includes Ireland and The United Kingdom.

(Ireland is the name of the State. Ireland is a Republic, and state may legally be described as the Republic of Ireland, but the "Republic of Ireland" isn't a member of international bodies such as the EU, the UN, the International Olympic Council, etc, "Ireland" is, and the Irish Embassy in London is "the Embassy of Ireland".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarik777

How do you say in Gaelic, "You might be right."?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

B'fhéidir is "maybe/perhaps/it's possible".

Tá an ceart agat is "you are right" (literally, "you have the right"). When used with the subordinating conjunction go, you use the dependent form of , so go bhfuil an ceart agat is "that you are right".

B'fhéidir go bhfuil an ceart agat - "It may be that you are right"

B'fhéidir go bhfuil, b'fhéidir go won't

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

B'fhéidir go bhfuil an ceart agat

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarik777

Please translate both literally and otherwise. A gor a maith a gut.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lorna801257
lorna801257Plus
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Nice info!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hilarylynne08

Thanks, friend!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Native english speaker in England. Interested in the celtic side of these islands heritage and Scots gaelic isn't available

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe.Ryan_999

im using it because my dad atchully is Irish and when I go back to Ireland I can talk to my best friend there in Irish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe.Ryan_999

cool

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahMusse1

Hi. I'm learning Irish. I study in Erie, Pa, United States. I am studying it because I have Irish in my heritage, and therefore want to learn it. I also do a lot of reenacting faires and I feel that learning Irish helps me connect to my histories and past. I am hoping to meet people who also speak and write the language so I can better learn it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wasilkowska
wasilkowska
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I am from Poland, no Irish friends or ancestry. I'm learning it(or more I would like to learn it since I only started it) because I think it sounds really cool(almost like elvish :P) and looks uniquely, not like any european language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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If I remember correctly, Welsh was a major influence on Tolkien’s Sindarin language, but he didn’t much care for the Irish language — to the point of borrowing Irish nasc (modern and ancient) for the Black Speech’s nazg (“ring”).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123
proinsias123
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I found this:

J.R.R. Tolkien, draft letter August 1967: “nazg: the word for ‘ring’ m the Black Speech. …it remains remarkable that nasc is the word for ‘ring’ in Gaelic (Irish: in Scottish usually written nasg). It also fits well in meaning, since it also means, and prob. originally meant, a bond, and can be used for an ‘obligation’. Nonetheless I only became aware, or again aware, of its existence recently in looking for something in a Gaelic dictionary. I have no liking at all for Gaelic from Old Irish downwards, as a language, but it is of course of great historical and philological interest, and I have at various times studied it. (With alas! very little success.) It is thus probable that nazg is actually derived from it, and this short, hard and clear vocable, sticking out from what seems to me (an unloving alien) a mushy language, became lodged in some comer of my linguistic memory.”

I found it on this page, which dicusses Tolkiens relationship with Ireland, Irish mythology and the Irish language. Interesting stuff: http://ansionnachfionn.com/leabhair-books/j-r-r-tolkien-and-ireland/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caitlinrid

I'm in Canada. I just wanted to learn because I've always found it interesting. From what I've heard, it's a dying language, but its just so diffrent from any other language, figured I'd give it a shot

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marci549106

Hi! I live in New Mexico, but my husband is from Ireland. We were married in Dublin, and I used to live there. I learned a little bit when I was there, and I loved the language. We ended up moving to the US, but I always wished I had learned more Irish; I even looked around for a tutor here. My daughter who is 10 is also doing the course. Her name is a traditional Irish name, and she has a penpal in the Gaeltacht (the child of a friend of mine). We still have a lot of friends over there... if they knew I was trying to learn Irish they'd say I wasn't right in the head :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LandaCrystal

Hi, I am French / Latin-American. Taking the course online. I am a Northern Ireland descendant. 4th generation. My family always did their best to keep the traditions of Ireland alive. We were taught never to forget our original roots and to honour them. Since relatively few people in the world know Irish I want to add to the numbers as my humble way to honour my ancestors. Thank you for your interest.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christy240276

I am a native English speaker, from US. I am primarily using Duolingo for Spanish and Italian, but I have added Irish and German as well. I am mostly taking Irish out of pure interest, and because it is so different from all other languages I have had experience with.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaymeKeefe

I am an American who speaks English as a primary language. I learned some Spanish and French in middle school, high school, and college.

Right now, I am working on the German course because I will be studying abroad in Germany and Switzerland for two weeks this summer, but I joined the Irish course because at some point when I have time, I would love to learn it. I have German and Irish ancestors, though I more closely align with my Irish side. My mom's side of the family has even traced their roots back to the Irish McLean clan, so I thought I would learn a few words and phrases in Irish for fun.

I hope one day to visit Ireland, but that unfortunately is not in the immediate future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mung6120

I am American . My grandparents were from Spiddal Ireland and I was there last year meeting with my first cousin once removed who still lives on the land owned by my great grandparents in Boliska. I am trying to learn Irish well enough to live in Spiddal for an extended period .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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I am native to the United States and spoke only English until taking my first language course in high school. Until recently, I have done little language learning but am about to become a nurse. During my preceptorship I worked with birthing families in a big city and found some of the mothers or others in the family spoke little to no English and came from places around the world. I started with Spanish, but have since added many languages, not only for my potential employment, but because it has always interested me. Also, I am trying to challenge my brain by learning several languages at one time. While I was at the hospital, there were several babies given Irish names, and I have always found the Irish and Gaelic culture interesting, so I took it as an opportunity.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chellmaia
Chellmaia
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I am learning in the United States, specifically Arkansas. Many of my ancestors were from Ireland, so I thought it would be nice to learn more about my roots. I am also a Genealogist, so you never know when the language might come in handy reading old records.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VeloKate

I am a Canadian (and living in Canada) with Irish heritage. I'm learning it to connect with my history.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LordofDisorder
LordofDisorder
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I'm from the US, and I live in the more southern part of it, where there is actually a significant Irish population that moved here from wayback. My mom's family is largely Irish, as is my paternal grandmother's, but the last few generations have never been culturally Irish (or culturally anything for that matter,) so I thought it would be cool as a heritage sort of thing. Extra motivation for keeping the language alive and perhaps passing it on to any kids I might have as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moomeh16

I live in Scotland and would love to learn Scottish Gaelic but that's not an option on this site (yet). I'm learning Irish as it's very similar to Gaelic. I'm also just about to receive my Irish citizenship as my family's Irish!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Nice.

Irish and Scottish Gaelic aren't really mutually intelligible, in my experience at least, although I'm sure they share many traits.

I'm a native speaker myself.

Once time I turned on the Irish TV station, TG4, and the 7 o'clock news was on.

They had a report from BBC Alba, which they do on rare occasions. It was in Scottish Gaelic, with Irish subtitles.

I missed the start of it, and I initially thought it was Belfast Irish with a weird accent or something and I couldn't understand what was being said much at all. I thought I was having a stroke!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taylorddavis
taylorddavis
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Irish American in the USA learning because of my interest in my motherland

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robert0199

I am an American born Irish American. I live in the U.S. and am retired. I am taking the coarse because I want to know more about the culture and of course the language. I do know that my lineage goes back to Brian B. but not much more. I have heard of the troubles and the potato famine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaAndrada1

I am from Roumania and I m learning irish for pleasure and because my dream is to come to visit Ireland :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siorghlas
Siorghlas
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Hi, I'm a Spaniard that has taken a year of Irish classes, but that was a decade ago. I've always liked traditional music from Ireland (and Scotland) and I guess for me learning the language meant to understand the lyrics and consequently more of their culture. Alas, I didn't have the time to continue. This course, I hope, will allow me to deepen my knowledge in my spare time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimGillooly
JimGillooly
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I'm an American from Connecticut, of Irish and German descent. I retired recently, and I want to keep learning and keep active. I learned some Spanish in high school, and wanted to learn a new language. Since I'm of Irish and German descent, I wanted to learn more about the Irish language, as well as German. It's enjoyable for me to learn and practice. There are several groups near where I live that teach Irish for free, and the group that I joined is fun and I always look forward to the classes with them. I am not fluent in Spanish, and I probably won't become fluent in any other languages, either. But I still enjoy learning. I'd heard that there is a concern about keeping the Irish language alive and active, and I'm glad to learn it and be part of keeping it active, even if I live far from Ireland. After all, I'm also going to learn German and I live far from Germany, too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamh3

Irish, learning in Ireland, and had never learnt in school as I was born in England to Irish parents who exempted me from studying it in school. I had no inclination either way at that age.

After many years travelling I felt I had to learn the native language like I had learnt several others in the past while abroad (French, Spanish, etc.), and feel it is a far more expressive medium for Irish culture than English, not least because I am interested in Irish-language texts, but also place-names, family surnames, music, and so on.

Now living in Ireland and want to replace a part of my life that occurs in English (work, recreation, family) to having space for Irish. Would like to see it be a spoken language in the workplace, bar, sports club, home, and not just a heritage language for all outside the official gaelteachtaí.

A Odoinn, seol mé d'alt tar éis an chomhdháil, le do thoil!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShaunOBoyl

I'm second generation British Irish (living in UK) with and interest in Irish music; particularly fiddle. My family severed all links with Ireland when they emigrated (a common practice, I guess) and I am just trying to learn a little more about Irish history & culture that was not passed on by my parents. I worked in Dublin in the early 1970s but it was a very different country then. I hope that learning some Irish will help me understand more about the Gaelic culture and it's provenance. Had a great trip to the Skelligs in 2015 & we are off to the Burren this summer where I hope to put some of this study to use.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidOdell1
DavidOdell1
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I'm from England, born and bred. My name isn't Irish, despite appearances. But I've always found Irish beautiful to look at and mysterious. When I started to learn, I realised it was just as beautiful as it looked and I find it an absolute joy. I know Latin and French but Irish is just so....different. Different word stock, different structure, different feel....but with lots of familiar words thrown in to lighten the load. I also am a keen student of History and I feel badly about the part my country played in attempting to kill this beautiful, flexible and melodic language. Long live the Irish language!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronMcGarvey

I'm an American of Irish descent (my grandmother moved to the States from Magherafelt, County Derry). I now work at a Catholic School with a very large Irish population (a bunch of the teachers and church staff, including the pastor and our bishop all moved here from Ireland). I've grown up around the fantastic Irish culture and I now work in a very Irish environment. I've always wanted to learn the language of my ancestors so I can immerse myself in the culture even more. Between the language and, being a music teacher, learning traditional Irish instruments and songs, I feel like I'm heading in the right direction =)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrumpyOldKev

I'm probably a bit late for the original purpose of this thread, but I am learning Irish in England as part of reconnecting with my Irish roots. I'm English, from Nottingham. I decided to learn Irish while tracing my family roots. Learning Irish is proving much easier than finding my family though :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilDolan3
PhilDolan3
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I live in the US (Portland, Oregon) and have only started taking the Irish lessons but I've been slowly going through the French ones for a while now. I'm hoping to get to where I can do at least 2 per day of each.

I am "Irish-American" although I'm not terribly fond of such hyphenated labels. I'd rather say that "I'm an American that just so happens to have descended from Irish immigrants" but I suppose that's too many syllables. Sometimes I worry that emphasizing these ancestrally-based labels (African-American, Italian-American, Chinese-American, <insert some place where you are not remotely "from" but one of your great-great-grandparents came from>-American) just promotes needless (and usually arbitrary) segmentation in a society that is supposed to be about casting off these previous identities and melding into one. E Pluribus Unum...

Soapbox aside, my interest isn't strictly born of a sense of ethnicity as I would also like to learn Latin and Japanese too. I also think there's something noble behind the idea of keeping as many languages alive as we can. In my opinion, it's absolutely criminal that so many native tongues of our country were allowed (if not encouraged) to die out.

I don't know if it's too late to help with your paper but that's my 2 cents and I even snuck in a plug for a couple more courses.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gantlord
gantlord
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I am Scottish, living in the Netherlands. I started using duolingo two weeks ago, to try to break through a plateau I'm on with Dutch. I speak a few languages and have a long-term ambition to learn Scots Gaelic, but the resources aren't so great. I thought I'd first have a go at Irish because Duolingo makes it so much easier, then have a go at Scots Gaelic afterwards and have it be a more spelling/vocab/pronunciation game rather than learning all the grammar.

Now that I'm actually learning Irish, I'm becoming more aware of my roots, which are 50% Irish within the last century or so. I have Irish-speaking ancestors more recently than Scots-Gaelic-speaking ancestors, so I'm happy to see where this takes me now, Scots Gaelic can wait until there's a mature duolingo course!

Once I get to the end of the course, I reckon I'll take a trip to Ireland and try my hand at talking to some old lads in pubs in the Gaeltacht.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andywolfma
Andywolfma
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I was planning on learning Scottish Gaelic on Duolingo, but there was no course available, so I tried out Irish and fell in love with the language.

GRMA to the wonderful Irish team.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gantlord
gantlord
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I'm in the same boat. I wanted to learn Scots Gaelic, but it's not available. Now I'm happy to be learning Irish!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Delienn
Delienn
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Hope new comments still help new ! I am learning Irish from France, Brittany, because I love the celtic languages but mine (Breton) has not been uploaded yet on Duolingo, because very few people speak it. I thought to myself, why not learn the language of my Celtic Cousins until maybe someday Breton appears here ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gantlord
gantlord
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I hope Breton gets on here at some point! I lived in Brittany for a while and would love to learn it. For celtic languages, my plan is to learn Irish, then learn Welsh, and then Scots Gaelic or Breton, whichever makes it onto duolingo first!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morrman
morrman
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Lived in Ireland my whole life, currently in 5th year. Using the course to discipline myself in practicing the language every day. I want to stay in Higher Level for my exams, despite achieving poor results. I first used Duolingo for Spanish but got excited when I saw the Irish course, and decided it could help me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Atl
Robert_Atl
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A Oisín, a chara,

Apologies for late response. That paper is probably complete, by now.

But to add to your data for the sequel, I'm from the U.S.A (state of Georgia) and studying Irish primarily because of my family's Irish roots. I read family records and added to the genealogy when I was still an undergraduate student. That work made me very curious about my Ulster ancestors - I continue to fill in the data as much as I am able.

But even before I was certain of those records, I'd had a long fascination with Irish mythology, folktales, traditional music, the story-telling traditions, etc. I used to play sets with friends at an Atlanta pub, and folks put up with my mediocre flute/whistle skills. To sum up, it all just "clicked." Now I can't get enough history, craic agus ceol with the natives to slate my appetite.

So the language was the obvious next step. I figured it couldn't be too tough for a guy who isn't intimidated by the likes of ancient Greek and Latin. Was I wrong. Gaeilge is a challenge for me; I struggle with it. For an Indo-European language, it is just plain weird. And I mean that in the sweetest way. As for Duolingo, well, buíochas le dia, and I thank you for your work on the course.

Ireland is now my family's favorite vacation destination and we hope to spend a good chunk of our retirement there. So - onward with the language practice! Which leads me to my favorite Gaeilge feature - the people. Whether in a Gaeltacht or in the back seat of a Dublin cab, the Irish people have been unfailingly patient with the odd American who insists on drawing them out to practice. My eternal thanks to them all.

P.S. Eoin Ó Conchúir of Bitesize Irish Gaelic found that last bit amusing enough to do a podcast with me for his site some time ago, entitled "Speaking Irish to Dublin taxi drivers (Ep. 13)." In my defense, I can promise and attest that no Gaels were injured in the making of that vacation. ;-)

Good luck on this paper and all others to follow,

Robert

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LightWhisper

I am from Portugal, Lisbon and I started learning Irish because I think of it as a magic language, its words, its sounds, really beautiful!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Atl
Robert_Atl
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You said that very well. "A magic language." I agree.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Speledro

I'm Irish. When I left primary school I could speak a good bit of Irish although i really didn't enjoy it. In my young mind it was associated with greyness, rain, the GAA, old country people and time that could have been better spent on maths or geography (my favourites!) In secondary school it got a lot worse as I was taught by a series of really crap teachers. Ploughing through poems and stories with no grammar lessons seemed to be the norm. I got 5 A1s in the leaving cert but by that time my frustrations with Irish had grown to apathy and I sat the exams at the Ordinary level. I distinctly remember my last Irish class saying to myself "Thank God, I'll never have this horrible language inflicted upon me again".

Fast forward 16 years. I've spent a lot of time travelling and have often felt a sense of guilt and shame when I see other European's speaking multiple languages with ease. I've always had a mental block with languages. I've told myself "my brain just doesn't work that way" or "Sure everyone speaks English anyway". Enough. I wish to speak another language and Duolingo seems to be a great way to getting that dream under way. As for Irish, well I want to give it a fresh start. I'm at the age where I'm settling in this country and so I feel it's only right to learn its language. My 68 year old mother is also doing it. She's on a 150+ day streak. She hasn't done any Irish since she left school either so it's a nice thing for us to discuss together. She keeps telling me "This wasn't the word for 'xyz' when I was going to school. They must have made this one up". I tell her she's obviously going senile but I'm secretly impressed that she's keeping it up.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamob544
adamob544
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Im pretty much like you :P . I was great at Irish leaving primary school, then from first year I just went downhill. Whats weird is my Irish teacher is like one of the best out of my school but she just wants to teach those who went to an Irish speaking primary school, which doesnt include me. I might do the odd work from exam papers and get them corrected but I have a habit of not learning from mistakes :P . Now Im 2 months away from junior cert and im still hopeless at Irish :( . Would you have any advice that may help me not get the result i got in the mocks (E) :P . All the best, Adam

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Speledro

If you’re only 2 months away from the exam then I’d just concentrate on doing past exam papers. Go through all of the aural exams. They probably repeat the topics (like News reports and weather forecasts) so you can get used to the same words coming up. I don’t know the format of the Junior Cert anymore so I can’t be any more specific than that. In the long run though I’d stick with the Duolingo (and perhaps try Memrise too as it’s good for building up vocabulary). Best of luck!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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She keeps telling me “This wasn‘t the word for ‘xyz’ when I was going to school. They must have made this one up”.

To be fair to her, some words are strongly associated with a particular dialect, so it could well be the case that a word given in the course here for “xyz” isn’t the word that she was taught in her schooldays.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RCK_
RCK_
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I began learning German and Irish with the intention of feeling connected to family. Having grown up in foster care, while tracing my heritage back to mainly Germany and Ireland, it gave me a sense of self. I'm grateful for Duolingo and the ability to learn something that seems insignificant to most that I speak with about it. I live in the US and get interesting comments about the language choice. I look forward to continuing learning these languages, as well as others!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elvisclare
Elvisclare
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Cónaí orm i nGaillimh. Ní cainteoir dúchais mé ach tá an Ghaeilge agam mar sin féin. Bhain mé triail as Duolingo chun seiceáil a dhéanamh air roimh aon rud a rá faoi do mo mhic léinn. Caithfidh mé a rá go bhfuil sé thar barr. Anois is é ceann de na háiseanna é Duolingo a luaim an t-am go léir le tosaitheoirí, taobh le teanglann.ie, focloir.ie, potafocal.com, tearma.ie agus An Foclóir Beag. An-jab go deo agus gach rath ar Duolingo!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rejistania
RejistaniaPlus
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Given that Rejistania is pretty much my main identity, I might as well: I am a German who immigrated into the RoI in 2010 and wants to learn Irish mostly because I love the country and because I create constructed languages and thus knowing a non-Latin/non-Germanic language definitely helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
Mod
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danke schön :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClionaJoyce

is creating constructed languages part of your job?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rejistania
RejistaniaPlus
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No, I do an IT/service sector job.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClionaJoyce

Oh, I just googled constructed languages..I didn't know people did that, cool

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rejistania
RejistaniaPlus
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If I may self-promote: my own work on Rejistanian is here: http://rejistaniha.de/rejistanian.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClionaJoyce

interesante, is Rejistania real? it would be funny if it was named after someone called Rejie (but then that's probably not how that name is spelt) it seems like so much has gone into that language, I wish you well with it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GillianBryan

I'm re-learning Irish. I'm Irish and currently based in China. After becoming fluent in Mandarin Chinese I decided I wanted to be fluent in Irish next.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazzaru

like des bishop the other way around. well done I wish you the best

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mlilley13

I like in the US but I have some Irish ancestors from my dad's side.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amelia414

I am learning french and just started the Irish course

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SportsOcean
SportsOcean
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I am learning in America. My grandpa's dad came straight from Ireland and spoke Irish. I would love to go to Ireland someday. I originally came on duo to help learn Spanish for my class, and French for fun. I looked at the language choices and saw Irish. I'm not very far into Irish, but I've learned enough to love the language! -SportsOcean

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Haydee2364

Hi! My name is Haydee I am from Puerto Rico. I am not Irish nor do I have any Irish ancestry that I know of. My family does come from Spain, Cataluna to be more exact and my children have some Galician ancestry (My ex hubby is a red-head) I am an English teacher to a community of students in a public local school with little access to English outside the classroom. I have an interest in languages in general and all things English, Scottish, and Irish in particular. Just a hobby. I enjoy the Irish course it is a challenge for me. Also learning a language for which I have no prior experience helps me understand a few of the difficulties my Hispanic students learning English with little opportunity to practice outside my classroom might feel like, and helps me give them advice as to how best to maximize their learning. So, it is a language learning experiment for me and I have gotten a few students involved with the Duolingo for schools feature with some success. I plan to continue learning Irish as I am loving the experience so far. The Irish-English dilemma in Ireland mimics mirror-like the Spanish-English dilemma in Puerto Rico. I believe educators on both sides of the Atlantic need to consider dual-language immersion programs as a solution to our common problems. In the near future, I hope to travel to Ireland and If I am lucky participate in a Gaeltacht immersion course. I look forward to discussing these issues with educators from Ireland. Hope to see you all soon.!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikebeeee

I was born and raised in Auckland,N.Z. currently living in China's Shenzhen. I am pretty much fluent in Chinese after three years or so without a teacher, know a little Cantonese (which is really just another Chinese dialect not a language, and there are other dialects which I feel are much more different to standard Standard Chinese) and also have some knowledge of the Hakka and Hokkien dialects . I wanted to learn another language because I was curious to see how it would differ from my learning of the Chinese language/dialects. So then I decided on Irish because my Granddad was from there and I've always found Ireland and Irish people entertaining.

My first Irish learning process was some downloaded pdf's with audio files from the pirate bay ( don't know if I should write that.. haha).I read up to page 40 give or take, which included introducing yourself, talking about occupations,numbers and a few other basics. But I found the print was a little unclear and I didn't enjoy the layout of the text and the teaching methods. So after feeling dismal about learning Irish for about a week or more after my eight hour or so study effort I decided to go round the net in search of learning materials I stumbled onto this. I can't say its as good as the learning Chinese Pleco app on my phone but it is much sufficient.

Compared to learning Chinese I have found it harder simply because I don't have an app like that on my phone lack of and I don't have any Irish speaking companions as of yet. But my Irish is still fresh, so we'll have to see.

I Can't believe Irish is the fifth most learnt language on this but I think that is also because it is so hard to find Irish learning materials and sadly I think most people just learn it for a bit of fun not sure it'll really be kept alive but only time will tell.

Also one of my favorite songs of all time has to be
Oro se do bheatha bhaili
Tomy Makem's version of course

also love the Irish rover and fairy tale of New York

hope that wasnt too much of a dull read best of luck with your paper(s)

Gaeil iad féin is ní Frainc ná Spáinnigh, Is cuirfidh siad ruaig ar Ghallaibh.

shoot of a few kneecaps to that one.. jokes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaeganASmith

I am a native English speaker from Louisiana, in the United States, and I started learning Irish because I want to eventually get to Ireland for research purposes. I am mostly Cajun/French through my mom but I realized only within the last 2 years that I am part Irish on my dad's side through genealogy work. My grandma used to play One, Two, Three O'Leary with us but I had no idea where that came from, until now. Because of these findings, and my fascination with Irish cultute since I was little, I want to continue research or go to school in Ireland, eventually, and I feel it is important to understand the native language.

It is also interesting to note the similarities between the revival of the Irish language and the revival of the Cajun/French language here. As a descendant of both sides, I feel that it is my duty to learn both!

Interesting topic and hopefully we all helped!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mat.nichol

Native English speaker just learning a little bit for fun. I like languages. I'm not very good at them but I like them

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nuria0123
Nuria0123
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Is Seapáinis mé. I am learning Irish because I am interested in Celtic mythology. Without speaking Irish, how can I talk to leprechauns? :P Irish is rather difficult to learn, though. I am now on level 14 but I haven't finished even half of my Irish tree.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GURDY77
GURDY77
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I live in (and am from) The U.S., the state of Pennsylvania. I started the course because all of my friends are from Europe and don't speak good English. It'd be easier for most of us we understood at least half of each other's language and communicated that way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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You live in Pennsylvania, all of your friends are from Europe, and every one of them has better Irish than English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarik777

What languages do they understand?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erchenswine
Erchenswine
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I am learning from the Middle East and my nationality is English. I started learning Irish on here because it was one of the newest languages built by contributors and out of curiosity to try and learn a Celtic language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zozoenieme

bretonne,en centre Bretagne, mais de langue française maternelle hélas, je souhaite apprendre l'irlandais, langue celtique, pour le plaisir et dans l'espoir de pouvoir l’expérimenter en allant visiter ce superbe pays, soit en vacances soit pour y vivre. ma fille apprenant le gallois ici, et les quelques mots de breton acquis, nous permettent de voir tous les liens entre nos langues celtes et c'est un vrai plaisir :) seul problème pour moi: mon anglais n'est pas encore suffisant pour comprendre comme il faut les notes grammaticales de débuts de cours :( serait ce possible d'avoir ( peut être pas proposé d'office, mais au moins sur demande?) une traduction en français de ces notes importantes, le cours en français n'existant pas. ce serait top! en espérant trouver un jour bientôt un cours de breton a partir du français :)

un grand merci a tous les participants pour le temps passé dans ce travail!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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seul problème pour moi: mon anglais n'est pas encore suffisant pour comprendre comme il faut les notes grammaticales de débuts de cours

oof... c'est assez difficile d'apprendre le gaélique avec anglais couramment. Bonne chance avec ça! :)

Le gaélique est ma langue maternelle, mais je ne peux pas expliquer la grammaire.

Cela dit, la langue et la culture est très riche. La communauté ici est assez fort donc peut-être les gens ne sont pas avoir beaucoup de problèmes...

Ouais, les volontaires sont excellents

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foudeb
Foudeb
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I'm French, live in the UK, tried the irish course mostly out of curiosity, to see how difficult a language it might be.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RorysMom22
RorysMom22
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I'm learning Irish because I don't ever want it to be close to dying out again. Additionally, I'm the descendant of Irish immigrants, so it's a way for me to pay tribute to them. USA, NY

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blaze1495

What an interesting topic! If you're still interested in people's motivations, I can add mine. I'm a 4th generation American with strong Irish heritage, married to a Gujarati (Indian) from England (Anglo-Indian, if you will). My husband's family is very much rooted in India and observes Hindu customs, and they all speak Gujarati fluently. We had twins just over a year ago, and we are teaching them English and Gujarati (as well as Spanish since I speak that being from NY, although that's not my heritage). I started learning Irish on duolingo to be able to teach my children as much about my own background as mu husband can, so that they have an appreciation of both sides of their ancestry. I have, in the process, learned so much more about my own background and it has been an amazing experience so far. Wish I had more time to devote to my studies.

Best of luck on your paper!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneStevens1

I'm learning in Australia. I have many Irish ancestors with the earliest arriving here in 1791. I plan to visit Ireland and want to be able converse a little in Irish to be polite, and to deepen my understanding of Irish culture. I also sing, and want to learn a song or two in Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MzMolly65

Canadian, living in the Pacific Northwest USA. I wanted to learn Irish for no other reason than it seemed like an interesting language, I want to keep my brain from going moldy and I hate seeing any language die out. There is a possibility of Irish in my heritage but I'm not entirely sure, the name could be Irish or Welsh and I'm not that worried about it.

I've paused the Irish for a little while now. I found it very, very challenging and it was difficult to lay my hands on other resources to aide my learning. I found myself not wanting to study any of my languages so I just put it aside temporarily while I focus on my French. When I finish my French tree I plan to pick up my Irish again.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuckyPaul24

I'm learning Irish, though my country of origin is USA (specifically Minnesota)

I'm Irish American and have always been interested in Irish culture and history.

This is a really good course btw. I'm not sure how else I could learn Irish in such an efficient way. Also, it's always an added bonus of course to learn your own name in a different language ! Not sure if that was your idea, but it's appreciated all the same :)

Beannachtaí,

Pól

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cheryl9134

I live in the U.S. but am of Irish decent , coming from County Mayo 4 generations ago. I have always been proud of my Irish heritage and wanted to learn Irish/Gaelic. I too hate the thought of the language dying out and am willing to do my part to help keep it alive. I spent a summer in Ireland years ago and I love the country and the people , not to mention the amazing history. I started on Duolingo to brush up on my Spanish and decided to try the Irish. I 'll continue to work on it. I also can't wait until they get the Hebrew course up and running!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveWells4

I'm learning in the US (Indiana). I've wanted to learn a Gaelic language for a long time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MKvHdd

Second generation Irish American, always wanted to learn. I recall, from when I was very young, my grandfather (from Cork) speaking Irish (tho he called it Gaelic, and 'accent' was 'brogue'!). I learned "kiss my ass", and "In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen', that's it ;-).

Anyway, always wanted to learn, and my daughter is currently in her fourth year of studies at UCD in Dublin, a visit there last March renewed my interest.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MZadarko
MZadarko
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I am learning in Co. Limerick, Ireland. My nationality is Polish but I have been living here for the last 10 years and I go to school here (I'm in TY right now, I'm 17). I started the Irish course here because my Irish teacher made a classroom for us and we do/play Duolingo in class once a week. We already study Irish in school and the Irish course on Duolingo is just for fun and to spice up our learning experience.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrsticAlek
KrsticAlek
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Hello! I am Aleksandra and I am from Serbia. :)

I started to learn Irish a few weeks ago. I've been always interested in Irish history and culture. I heard about Ireland when I was a child and Celtic history was something most fascinating to me. I have never been to Ireland but I must say the more I read and hear about it, the more I love it. Irish dance and music give me goose pimples every time I hear or see it. :D

I am passionate about languages. I study English and I know Russian and French as well, but the Irish language has always been my goal and it's almost impossible to learn Irish in Serbia, so I decided to "google" a solution. :D When I learned the first skill of Irish I was so excited and happy that I was close to start to cry.

Irish is a "small" language, which makes it special. Being a part of a small company of people with a knowledge about a rear phenomena is amazing. Secondly, I find it crucial to help "small" languages to exist today. I believe I contribute to the existence of the Irish language if I learn it and practise it.

Moreover, the Celts inhabited the Balkans long time ago. They founded many cities which exist in Serbia even today. Our capital, Belgrade, is such - it stands on the Celtic remains. If one would look on the map Ireland and Serbia, those two countries are far from each other, but no one cannot deny the existence of something common in the temper and behaviour of the Irish and the Serbs.

All in all, the history, culture, people, music, simply the spirit of Ireland inhabited my heart so I couldn't help but learn to speak its language. :)

I hope I helped. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_Brady6034

I'm also in Cork but from Scotland via England. Learning because it intersts me, seems the polite thing to do and I want to understand the underlying culture before it disappears completely - After all it's where my own roots are based.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crooty
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I'm from Switzerland, French speaking part. I started learning Irish because I love Irish beer and I was intrigued by the "fír / mná" signs on some doors in Irish pubs, and because I like challenges. I travelled a little in Ireland over 15 years ago and I remember liking the road signs with the places names both in English and Gaelic. I would love to go back. And I love sheep. ^_^

I kind of started learning Gaelic a few years ago with a "Teach yourself" book + CD course, but stopped at the introduction: "pronunciation". After learning Spanish last year with Duolingo and loving this method, I was thrilled when Irish for English speakers came out! I'm not sure I'm very good at pronunciation though, but I'm almost done with my tree, after a year an a half…

(next on my list are Japanese and Icelandic, maybe Finnish and Welsh)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josizzle
josizzle
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If you want to learn Japanese... I recommend starting here: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar

It's an AMAZING introduction to/review of the grammar!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josizzle
josizzle
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Hi! I'm living in South Carolina, now (moved home from California). I'm studying because I have a bit of an obsession with languages (they come extremely easily for me, but, in return, their study becomes a bit of an obsession), and to keep it in check, I gave myself little "games"... like... "I'll learn one language from each continent"... or "I'll learn the languages of each of my various heritages"... My father's family has always been a little bit of a mystery, but, recently, I've found that, genetically speaking, we are from Ireland/England. This was a theory in the family for a while, but now it's been confirmed. Honestly, I started trying to learn Irish in high school (WAY back in the day) but the lack of resources made it impossible! Nowadays, Duolingo, and Seinnteoir TG4, etc make things a LOT easier.

This summer I will be travelling to Ireland to study with Oideas Gael for two weeks, intensively... I'm pretty insanely excited!

Ethnically speaking... I'm Japanese, and Euromix (Irish and German we know for sure)...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinAziz1

I am in Canada learning Irish. I was curious about the language and enjoy the way it sounds and the expressions. I get a kick out of reversing grammar from my mother tongue, english. I find it very challenging and am slowly picking it up.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyCeallachan

I am an American (Florida) with a mainly Irish background. I'm what a native Irish person would likely call a plastic Paddy, somebody who desperately clings to Irish culture do to not having much of my own cultural identity. (Hey, that's kind of what happens when you're brought up being taught you that the land you grew up in isn't REALLY yours and the only people who truly belong here are the natives and everyone else is from somewhere else.)

I'm on my second day of attempting to learn Irish. Somebody posted a link to this website on Imgur a while ago, and I saw that Irish was an option on here. I've already tried my hand at studying Japanese and had an easy time of it, so I figured I'd give Irish a shot. It is much harder, yet I already love it a lot more. I've got my fingers crossed that I'll be able to get the hang of it with enough practice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Regl.
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Hi! I am living and studying in Germany, and started to study Irish out of curiosity, as it is so different from the germanic and romanic languages I know so far. My first foreign language was English, then French and Latin (still at school), later I started adding Spanish and Italian. After that I thought I should turn towards scandinavia and started with Swedish and Norwegian. Admittedly my level of fluency varies widely and at the moment my focus is mainly on English and Spanish, but I try not to neglect the other languages too much.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaneMaynar

I am an American who had an Irish grandmother. I am learning Irish in the US. I am retired and have become interested in my Irish ancestors and heritage and would like to familiarize myself with their language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bettina87

hey I hope it's not too late to give my answer: I am Italian and in the past 5 years I lived in US and Germany. Now I am between Germany and Poland. Personally since I travel a lot I love learning new languages, and to me Irish sounds "exotic" enough to make it very interesting. Actually everything started with hearing a little bit of Scottish Gaelic or Irish in movies and series and I liked it. So... here I am :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supjohn31462
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I am in the United States. I am learning Irish because....well....not to seem like a total nut job but......I had a dream and there was a song being sung and it was in Irish....and since I got nothing better to do.......

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvrenTarja
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I am italian and learning from Italy, I am 18 and absolutely fond of languages, I enjoy learning about languages and cultures and their development through time and the impact they can have on the people. Also there would be a slight chance for me to go study in Ireland so I'd like to know as much as I can about this culture.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sara51863

I really enjoyed and found enlightening both reflecting and responding to the question and found all the answers so interesting. Thank you to everyone who responded so thoughtfully.

I am learning Irish through in northern California. I've been interested in learning Irish my entire life. In addition to having Irish ancestry through my grandparents, I always have loved learning languages. In addition to studying Italian, French and Spanish, and actually tried to learn Gaelic about 25 years ago on my own from a book that I picked up while visiting Ireland. As you can imagine, it was really hard, and I quickly gave it up. Discovering Duolingo just a few weeks ago has reignited my passion for languages and allowed me to explore this very cool language that is so very different from the romance languages I have studied.

In addition to being super interested in language learning in general (my masters degree is in Teaching English as a Second Language), my grandparents' first language was Irish, and they immigrated to the states from Galway before my father was born. They did not pass their language down to him, so I've always been fascinated with that lost piece of heritage. In addition, my two young teenage daughters are Irish dancers, and we are exposed all the time to communications coming from Ireland, so there's a motivation to try learning to at least read some of them. I've roped my two daughters into doing it with me and we have a lot of fun in the car to and from Irish dance practice 3-4 times a week practicing with each other.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenBittenbender

I'm an American living in Pennsylvania and I think that this is an excellent course! I started last night and I'm already learning so much!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CathMayo

I'm in England and have an Irish father. Our family have spent many holidays in Ireland and I was always fascinated by the signs and Irish words that could be seen all over the place. My parents are going to be retiring to live in Southern Ireland in the next year or so, so it seemed a good time to have a go.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eithne1121

I'm learning in America, an Irish American (half Irish but that half may as well be whole for all the pride I have in it!) that found out several years ago that the Irish even had their own language. I knew a few things before starting this course but wanted to learn even more. I found out my great grandfather came from Co. Galway at the turn of the century and while he spoke Irish, he didn't teach his children. That, I think is the biggest reason I'm trying to learn it. That and because I find it a beautiful language that should be learned by all. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntAlbanach

I have moved to Ireland recently but I am from Scotland. Moving over here I started working with people who are bilingual and would speak it as their native language when back home with family in Galway. I also decided to start looking at schools and the best schooling seems to either be through high expense or a gaelscoil. As gaelscoil's give preferential access to children and families with some gaeilge I thought I would start learning now and in 4 or 5 years I'll be ready to help children with their homework.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gantlord
gantlord
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great reasons! Also really heartening to hear that bumping into native speakers is a thing that is really happening these days.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntAlbanach

It is nice to bump into native speakers and it happens often but you'd probably never know. I certainly speak little at work unless it is Irish words used in daily chat like Taoiseach or bainne. Sometimes people will say some simple Irish like 'I dont know' or 'could I use the toilet'. I enjoy seeing my Malaysian and Singapore colleagues using the odd phrases.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kim963732
Kim963732
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I'm French Canadian and lived in Ireland for a short while. I fell in love with the sound of the language and wanted to learn more while there but while in Ireland but could not figure out how to. I cam across Duo Lingo just a few days ago and I'm very thankful. I already know a bit regarding Irish history but I was wonderfully surprised to find this program. I had only thought of checking out the French section for a friend who wanted to learn French.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barbara205778

Hi Odoinn I am hungarian, who is intrested in celtic culture. I took the advantage to learn Irish and get better in English also. I have plenty of time while travel to work then back home and Duolingo is my nice and useful "company" during this. Hope once I will have a chance to try my skills in real too . Good luck to your paper work!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanSpencer66

I am English born of Northern Irish parents (who had only a few words of Irish between them, mostly prayers) and I am now living the greater part of each year in Tanzania. I came to this course through two of my children who were doing the Portuguese and Spanish courses respectively. This way of learning suited me - as it could be done at my own pace and in any environment. So, as I had always wanted to learn Irish but could never give the commitment to do a conventional language learning course and didn't get on with text based language learning, this was an excellent solution.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janai.freer

I'm a native English speaker from America. I started the course on duolingo because I had actually never heard the language before, which sort of surprised me. it has such an interesting sound and though I've only just started, it's fun to learn here on duolingo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChapatiB

If it's not too late to contribute: I am French and I am learning Irish because my fiancé is Irish. He speaks the language, even if it's not on a regular basis, and I'm in love with learning new languages, so I wanted to give it a go! :) Good luck with your paper!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdubois_79

I just signed up as my ancestry is Irish (originally a Kells) and I love everything about the country and even though people speak English there I would love to be able to speak to natives or read signs and such. I am an Australian and live in Australia, but have also lived for 13 years in America.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachr777

I am a Southern United States native and I have Irish background on both my mother and my father's side. I want to learn Irish so someday I can travel to Ireland and immerse myself in the culture.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SummerSnow4

I hope it's not late--Australian, living in Australia, using Duolingo to study. I have strong Irish ancestry, and I feel more connected to it than the rest of my ancestral connections. It's been hard for me to find good language resources for Irish, and I've been so happy that there's a course for it here!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosemaryDowling

I am from New York in the US. My great grandparents on my mother's side came from Ireland. My father was born in Ireland and at a year and a half was brought to the US. Because of my father's birth, I am automatically an Irish citizen, having dual citizenship in the US and Ireland and both American and Irish passports. I have always had a love of Ireland, it's culture, legends, music and land. I visited Ireland eight times. I'm a member of an ancient Celtic Christian Community, Céile Dé, where we chant and prayer in Irish. I've wanted to hear the language but found it difficult. I was delighted to find DuoLingo and finally begin learning Irish in a way that works for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanikaAtki

I have just started doing the Irish course. I think Duolingo is great because even if we only know two or three greeting words it makes our world sweeter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NIckKaos09

I am, like the many others, learning Irish. My country of origin is the United States (Maryland).

I chose to learn Irish because my family has always celebrated their Irish heritage. We always wanted to try and learn some Irish, so I started that dream just today.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaylaKnowe

I'm a native speaker from Conamara. i decided to do this course because i was using duo to learn German and when i saw the Irish course i had to check it out, help improve it if i could and generally see if it was any good.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vanessa661177

Hi! I'm from Switzerland and speak french. I start learning Irish for fun and because I like to visite Ireland and like to know the language. But are the Irish people still speaking Irish? And making the cours english/irish is also improving my english. ;-) Best luck for the conference! Vanessa

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

There is a short film called "Yu Ming is ainm dom" about the experience of one you man who learns Irish so that he can visit Ireland that you might enjoy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vanessa661177

Very nice the film! I will then focus more on my Welsh now. ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Speledro

Most Irish people, unfortunately cannot speak Irish, or can do so only on a very basic level. We do have small regions, known as Gaeltachts, where people speak Irish exclusively. These are mostly in the West of the country. If someone completed this course they'd have a better level of Irish than 95% of the population.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErintheAwesome

I'm learning in the U.S. (along the western coast), but the majority of my family, both on my mother's and father's side, are Irish and have lived there until moving to the U.S. I'm learning Irish since my uncle lives there, and I'd like to know more about my family's culture.

Heck, I was even named "Erin" purely to remember my Irish heritage. Best of luck on your paper!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephanieS749532

I'm learning in Ohio and I really have no other reason besides the fact that I love Irish culture and have always thought the Irish language was beautiful.

Learning through Duolingo has been simple and conducive to my learning style, which is repetitive lessons really help me. I especially like the "strengthen" option.

I hope to some day visit Ireland, or even live there permanently if my dream comes true, and hope that knowing basic Irish helps when I get there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nwshredder2406

I am learning Irish from Montana, because the town I grew up in, Butte, is notorious around the area for being highly populated with Irish-Americans because of the rich mining history in the early 20th century. My family immigrated to Butte from Dublin, landed in New York, and headed out west to work in the mines.

Today, Butte is becoming a tourist attraction as the rich history has left a huge impact on the town, and St. Patrick's day is the biggest tourist holiday of the year. Since I was a young girl, it has been worshiped as a sacred holiday to the citizens of Butte, as a way to pay homage to the deep Irish roots. Unfortunately, as our society is not truly that of Ireland, many folks don't follow the traditional Irish culture, and the holiday has diminished to simply a holiday to drink too much, and to wear green to avoid being pinched.

My intentions with learning Irish, are to not only diversify myself, but also to learn about the culture on my own so that I am able to spread the word and keep traditions alive. My hope is that, with learning the language, I may be able to read texts that were written in Irish, to learn more about the culture from reputable sources.

I found it disheartening that simple phrases such as "Dia duit!", "Le de thoil", or "Slán" raised the question, "What does that mean?!" From anyone I spoke them to on a holiday that is supposed to be celebrating the culture from which the language originates.

I suppose that over the years, I have always wanted to learn to speak the language because not only is it beautiful, ancient, and relative to my own ancestry, but also because I believe that learning the language myself will open a gateway for others to learn about the culture, rather than the typical American declaration of "I'm Irish!" I feel it is a bit of my duty to pay homage to the country where my family came from, and to be respectful to the current Irish society to help teach the difference between American Irish, and, well, Irish Irish. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryantCochranJr

I'm learning in Arkansas, USA. I am of Irish and Native American (first people) decent and am learning Irish and Nakota/Lakota mostly because it is nice to know the languages I come from.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alypossum

I'm in USA, and am American. I always thought Gaelic was a beautiful language. I tried to teach it to myself when I was a teenager with only a couple phrase books and a tape of gaelic songs. I learned how to pronounce words, and the days of the week and counting and a few other basics, but without someone to practice with, it never went anywhere. I'm delighted to pick up fresh (in my mid 30s) with duolingo!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingonberry24

Probably too late but in case other people are curious: I am learning Irish in America only through Duolingo, since it seems to not be a very popular language, or at least not where I live (New Jersey). I am American (Dutch originally (like...twenty or so generations ago?)) and a bunch of other european-ness. I recently visited Ireland and definitely want to go back soon!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia164807
Julia164807
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I'm learning Irish in Wales for two reasons. Firstly my father was from a 100% Irish family (who immigrated to Wales around 1849 from west Cork) He grew up in an almost 100% Irish community in Cardiff. Secondly my son went to Trinity College, Dublin, met his wife and they rare expecting their first child in August 2016. I want to support the child's Irish language as well as pass on the Welsh language to it. I really want to be able to read to my grandchild in Irish and sing songs for it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Atl
Robert_Atl
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What a great set of reasons to learn! Do you know this book? - Singing in Irish Gaelic by Mary McLaughlin (with CD or online audio) and available at Amazon.uk. One of my favorite learning tools, and it just struck me several of the songs would be good lullabies. Go n-éirí an bóthar leat.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Singing-Irish-Gaelic-Mary-McLaughlin-ebook/dp/B017CCHV32/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1460839762&sr=8-1

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkAngel3090

I am Scottish. I'm learning Irish because in all honesty its the closest to Scots that I am ever going to get (yes I know they are not the same but it is the closest) as I have no one and no sources to teach me Scots and that's sad.. I have a lot of Irish friends from university in Dundee and just thought it would be interesting just to learn another language. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Have you seen the LearnGaelic site for learning Scots Gaelic?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkAngel3090

Hello! Thank you so much. No I've never seen this site before . I've had a go at the site already and can't wait to get stuck in and learn some Gaelic! Thank you. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Hope you have the time to keep up an Ghaeilge as well since both languages complement each other.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia164807
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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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There's a typo in the link. I think it might be http://www.feisean.org

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
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You mean Scots and not Scottish Gaelic, right? If so you can start here: http://omniglot.com/writing/scots.htm http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/scots.php

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SxNL7NaicQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwTWUk0ba_Aspfreload=5

If you mean Scottish Gaelic, I have a friend who's learning it. It's difficult due to the lack of resources and speakers, but not impossible, and in fact it seems to be undergoing a revival. My friend does video-based distance courses online.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkAngel3090

Hello! No, sorry i mean Scots Gaelic. I'm pretty fluent in Scots because i am a Scot. :) I'm from up near Aberdeen and so know all about Doric etc and can speak it pretty well apart from some regional differentiations . But thank you for your help anyway. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
cdub4language
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Hey, there's even Wikipedia in Scots! https://sco.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonABBreizh

I am learning Gaeilge in Breizh (Brittany) because it is a celtic language like Breton (that I speak fluently). I am also learning Welsh for the same reason an these lessons do really help me. The Irish language is for me one of the most beautiful on Earth. I really enjoy to speak and hear Irish, and I really hope I will go someday to Éire, to use Gaeilge with people ! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveDeasy

I am somewhat studying Irish. I mostly study Spanish (90%), German (9%) and about 1% Irish. I'm mostly interested now in Spanish, as it's most useful for me. I've studied German in the past, and a couple of other languages too.

Why Irish? My heritage is Irish, County Kerry and County Cork. I've been to Ireland. My mother's parents were Irish speakers from the Dingle Bay region. More than that though, I feel that studying more than one language helps me pick up the Spanish easier. Makes that part of the brain more flexible.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ASIAX5650

I'm doing this course because my ancestors were Irish (which would make me at least 50% Irish). I've always loved Ireland since I was really young and I still am hoping to go there some time and see the place where my ancestors called home (and be able to speak this language fluently).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcdermottc1

I'm American, currently living in Pennsylvania, but many of my ancestors were Irish who came to the US in the 1840s. So for me it's a matter of cultural background, and of loving languages in general, since I have studied Latin, Spanish, German, and a little Mandarin. I would love to retire to Ireland if I could make it work financially.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MidnightStarr44

I'm learning Irish in the U.S because I'm Irish American but i never really learned irish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7wombats
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I'm in the US but come from England. A friend of mine took Irish in college. Last week, to honor the 100th anniversary of the execution of Patrick Pearse in the Easter Uprising, we challenged each other to get to at least level ten on the duolingo Irish course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windsaw

I am from Germany. The reason why I try to learn irish is not so simple.

When I was a child I was fascinated by the fact that it was an old language and that it was the language of Asterix. (both not really true, but hey, I was a child)

When I grew older, I once toured through the south of Ireland by bycicle. At one point we came through a gealtacht area. We noticed it at first because the town sign was irish and our map wasn't, so we had difficulties navigating. (it was Cùil Aoda I think) In the store they also spoke irish. This was the first time I actually heared it and the sound fit perfectly to the way I imagined it: raw and ancient. I didn't try to learn it back then because it was rumored to be insanely difficult to learn (not true I know by now) and there simply wasn't any german learning materials back then.

About two decades passed. Now I have the Internet. I have found learning materials although I bought them more for evaluation than actual learning. I have triad to learn japanese for many years but ultimately failed. I hate failing and looked elsewhere to a language to learn. By I have to say that languages in general have become a hobby of mine and it gets on my nerves that I have only learned one single foreign language so far. Learning another useful language was out of the question as long as it was boring (like all romance languages). So I came back to irish.

I still have to say that this course is still more an evaluation on learning techniques. I was just happy that Duolingo actually featured a language that is actually interesting to me. I have started and let's see where it leads me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/themantalope

I'm an American. 3 of my great-grandparents and one grandparent emigrated from Ireland to the US (all illegally lol). I'm learning Irish because of Chinese. Let me explain.

In university I studied Chinese initially because 1) I needed some language credit and 2) my youngest sister is adopted from China and I have an uncle who is Chinese. I ended up taking many more courses than required because I liked the challenge and it was fun to learn. I then had the wonderful opportunity to study Chinese for a year in China on a scholarship. During my time there I really grasped the language and learned enough where my mind could operate in Chinese without needing to translate constantly back and forth. It was during this period that I began to understand the delight of having other ways of thinking at my mind's disposal. I could express myself and understand emotions and understand the world in ways that English (through no fault of its own) limited me.

While this change from being monolingual to bilingual was occurring, my time in China also made me think deeply about who I was, and as a part of that, how I ended up where I was. Of course at some point I thought about my ancestors and where they came from, and I began to wonder about the way they must have thought about the world and what things were like for them. My great-grandparents had Irish but never taught their children because at this time in American history immigrants did everything they could to get their kids to assimilate, and part of that was making sure they spoke English well, even at the expense of their native languages. For me, I wanted to learn more about the culture and language of Ireland. Trying to learn enough now so I can read some interesting literature, such as "An Béal Bocht".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liam003

I'm learning Irish (after Italian) in South Australia because my parents migrated from Ireland to Australia and I regularly visit to see my relatives.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cindsardella
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I suppose I'm too late! I will share my little story anyways.

I'm German and I had a relationship with my Irish friend for around two years which led to many visits. His family would often try to introduce me to the Irish culture a little more, fairytales and a little bit of history and such, that caught my interest.

I also thought the language sounded so weird and cool and difficult and almost not comparable to any other language I knew, a little bit like english backwards. ;)

So I think my main reasons were love, curiosity and more insight in Irish culture. I didn't want to walk around anymore without knowing at least a few words. And Ireland rocks! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuGSh
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Hi! I'm in Argentina using the Irish course. I was born in Argentina and I'm Irish-Argentinian (my grandfather and his parents and grandparents were immigrants). I started the course mainly because of that, so as to better understand my family's culture, and because I love learning languages. I learned English and I'd always wanted to learn Irish. Yesterday I found out that Duolingo has this Irish course so I started it! I hope to meet people here in Argentina who also want to learn Irish or already speak it so as to practice and learn together. Hope you did great on your paper presentation! Greetings from the South! Luciana

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cute_kay

My mother is Irish and I'm obsessed the Irish language myself, I try to learn as much as possible , whenever I can. I think people take the Irish the wrong way but they are beautiful people. I recently took a course of irish dancing and it was amazing and being in front of a croud is a big deal for me . so just remember that life's to short so learn irish while we still can, here's a quote I like to use: its okay to be a glow stick coz sometimes you need to break before you shine. thank you xx

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmaineDoherty

I live in California, and I am of Irish descent, a daughter of five Irish clans from Donegal and Sligo. We were a family of the Irish diaspora first by way of grandparents to Australia and New Zealand, then my generation to the US. Our father reminded us frequently through song and literature that we were Irish and fiercely proud of it. I promised myself that I would learn the language of my family once I retired. The goal is to be able to converse with my family in Ireland in our heritage tongue. I'm grateful for the resources of Duolingo in making this commitment a reality.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Somiyah2

I'm learning in Saudi Arabia and what prompted me is that I moved away from Ireland and none of the other languages I am learning have the same connection I have with Irish. My nationality is Irish-Pakistani.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyClark8

Hi from England! I'm learning it because I love Ireland and have some Irish ancestry. Also I want to be one of the many people fighting to keep the language alive. I'm dyslexic so naturally bad with languages, so chances are I will only ever learn one. Irish felt the right choice for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/torowan
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You are still looking for answers? I am: from Brazil; learning in the United States; because it is one of my tribal languages (my ancestor left County Cork in 1837 from what I understand).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JennyWalke5

Hi. I am from Sydney, Australia. My great grandmother was from Belfast, who married into a Scottish family in Australia.

I love Celtic music, am trying to conquer flute, tin whistle and low D whistle, took up Irish dancing for 2 yrs when I turned 52 so I could understand the music requirements for dancing better, and have just returned from a wonderful (but short) trip around Ireland! I would love to understand the lyrics of the songs sung in the Irish language that I listen to.

Am finding Duolingo a wonderful resource.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dobbslearning

My family and I are from the US. Wé currently live in California. I was born in germany to an USAF (air force) couple, but moved home, asap due to medical reasons and have lived ALL over the US. My husband is going to school, and we are hoping to become expats some day. We are not happy with all the imagrants here that are illegal, and those that just refuse to learn English. Ireland is our first country of choise, due to both of us being of Irish and Native American decent. I know English is spoken in Ireland, but, learning Gaeilge has ALWAYS intrests me, due to my great grandmother speaking both, Gaeilge and English. We also feel that the more you know about a country prior to moving helps you assimilate faster. We know it's not necessary to learn to live in Ireland, but could be useful and fun. Our next country of choice would be England, so we could travel to Ireland and see Europe too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
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It's really great that you have an interest in Irish and the Irish culture.

Can I ask what impact illegal immigrants have on you personally or your family? It's very common for politicians and other people in power to use scare tactics, in order to demonise people with no voice. It seems like a rather flimsy reason to want to leave.

On the other hand, a desire to see the world and be part of other cultures is a great reason. That seems to be a big part of it for you.

Immigrants tend to do jobs that no American citizen would ever consider or at least not for the pitiful wage offered. If they all went home, assuming home is even somewhere else, the country would collapse. Even Donald Trump, despite all he says, has admitted on several occasions that the country needs a steady stream of illegal immigrants to keep it ticking over. And they have to be illegal, because if they weren't, they wouldn't have to do the jobs the rest of America won't do.

In my experience and that of others I have spoken to, immigrants, illegal or not, do their best to integrate. When you are an economic immigrant living illegally in the US, integrating can be very difficult. Learning English is difficult when you have no access to American education and the circles you mix in are nearly all illegal immigrants too. There certainly are some people who have no interest in learning English, but so what? Not allowing people to speak their mother tongue is what the British did in Ireland and look what it has done to my language?

Sorry for the sermon, but I felt like you might see things differently or at least think about it some more.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Haydee2364

As an ESL teacher teaching English to impoverished children whose economic opportunities will suffer because of their lack of skills in English and as a Hispanic (Puerto Rican- PR are all US Citizens BTW) I applaud your comment! The environment surrounding many of these people does not encourage their learning and too many teachers encountering immigrant children do not care enough or are already too frustrated and/or burdened by a system that does not help enough and punishes a lot! P.S. What was done to the Irish people when they were denied their own language and heritage was terrible and I support and applaud all efforts done to keep this beautiful language alive. I believe firmly in multiculturalism and intend doing my bit by learning and loving a language and heritage to which I have no blood claim!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kalel-Kent

I am ^_^

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkY_Oblivion

I will start learning Irish soon. I just want to get done with unit one in Italian then I might consider it. But one things for sure I will be doing it for sure. Eventually.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fitzgearld

Hello, I am in and from the USA. I don't do much talking in any language. My name is of Irish origin.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JadeAshton.1.2.1

im learning irish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harps12345

hello

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
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I had started to learn Irish out of curiosity, but because it is not my primary focus of learning, I found it too difficult to adapt the pronunciation not matching the spelling. I had found Spanish and Dutch far easier to learn. Even Russian is making more sense to me.

Someday, I may make another go at it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
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I also found it pretty difficult for my brain to adapt to Irish spelling. Giving it a try then waiting a few months actually seemed to help though; much easier the second (or third) time around, once your mind has had some time to digest!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Regl.
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Hi! I'm German and living in southern Germany. I started to learn Irish out of curiosity as it is so different from the germanic and romanic languages I have been studying so far.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andthentheyran

Learning in Australia; anglo-Australian (in the 'descent' sense; my family are not recent migrants from the UK); Learning out of curiosity about the language, perhaps also out of wanting to get a handle on a language that's being revived. (Note: I have put my Irish 'studies' on hold until the mess with the course audio is sorted out)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn
odoinn
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It is sorted now. I hope that you take it back up soon. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andthentheyran

Good to hear! Thanks for your time in letting me know.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deejayvaidya
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I am in the US and started the course before a tourist visit to Ireland. I do not have Irish heritage. But it seemed like fun. Unfortunately, I did not persevere beyond the first few units.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john64012

I am, and it is a lot harder than I thought it would be

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bearsbubba

I am Canadian, from BC, currently in Alberta.....I am Caucasian, and before this didn't know anything except how to butcher hello and goodbye in French :p

I have a dayhome and part of my planning etc is to incorporate the child's heritage. I mentioned learning the colors etc to someone at work and she showed me this app. Then I just got hooked :) I had no intentions of learning!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

You might want to check out this béirín.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil891051
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Looks like you might have already collected all the info you're after but might as well add just in case. I have no tie other than I work at an Irish bank in the UK and thought it would be funny knowing a few phrases to throw round at Irish colleagues. Did not expect to get to level 10 but it's really tough and I don't want to let it beat me! I want to complete the tree, not sure I'll be topping it up too much after that though. At the rate I'm going I'll be level 25 by the time I complete the tree though..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Maith an fear!

How have your Irish colleagues reacted, or are you saving it all up until you're fluent? :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil891051
Phil891051
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Saving it all until I'm fluent. Now that I've covered the sentence about importing people I think I'm getting close! It'll be more interesting if I have all the words and no pronunciation

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil891051
Phil891051
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Oh.

Apparently I'm not saving it until I'm fluent because a few sentences might have slipped out. I should have invited people from here as there were a lot of native speakers congregated near St Paul's in London last night!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValGalOlsen

i am but not today!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macacodeduolingo
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I fell in love with the Gaelic language when I discovered Clannad back in the 1980s. Since they are from Donegal Máire sings quite a song in Gaelic and I have always enjoyed the beauty of it and wanted to understand it more.

Since then I have met my wife in Ireland, I am French, she is American and we have always felt that Ireland is an important part of our life and always enjoy visiting there.

I also took Gaelic on Duolingo to see if it was part of the Indo-European family of languages.

I would love to see a slow version of the spoken parts and more audio that I can repeat as it is the most challenging language on my list so far.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
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The course should get new and improved audio soon, but in the meantime, you can try using this website: http://www.abair.tcd.ie/ (switch to the English version of the page)

Copy/paste the text you want to hear, then choose the speed and click "synthesize." It's not perfect but it's helped me to sort out the sounds a lot.

Another Clannad fan here! Slowly starting to understand their songs!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyWilliams1

Learning in NE Kansas

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ninja_slasher

I am learning irish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/6417508513

I am currently learning Irish on Duolingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chris.j.waldeck

I am and it's an interesting course. Can we share it to LinkedIn?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Petroc2
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bi sinn inteanach

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matdiver

Well done!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveDeasy

Please add that I'm from the USA.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nwwsl
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I am an US citizen, and I live in China. I have only done about one lesson in Irish, because the lack of audio frustrates me. I'm interested, because I enjoy learning languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finn.scathach

I'm from London (England, in case that wasn't obvious!). I'm trying to learn some Modern Irish because I study Medieval Irish at university (as part of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic at Cambridge), and in the future I'd like to go on to study in Ireland -- most of the courses that interest me require a decent level of Irish, so I was hoping this would get me started. I also thought it might help me understand Medieval Irish a tiny bit more, and since I'm currently taking time out of university for health reasons, Duolingo is a way of keeping my brain ticking over. Moreover, when I go back to uni I was hoping to join the Modern Irish classes offered as an extracurricular, but I found the Beginner classes pretty dull, so I'm hoping I can boost myself up enough to join the Intermediate classes come October. Might be a big ask -- we'll have to see how well I get on with this and with the 'Teach Yourself' book I bought.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bchisx
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I'm in the U.S., and I'm just dabbling with it while I learn Spanish. Once I'm done with Spanish I'll dive into it much harder.

Why am I learning? For fun, primarily. I like the sound of Irish (it sounds fantastical, if that makes any sense), and I like the idea of better understanding the world through language.

I don't have any Irish heritage that I know of, but I'm an American mutt, so who knows.

I'm from WNC, if that matters.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felicity-an-file

Tá mise anseo le cúpla seachtaine anuas :) Táim ag foghlaim na Gaeilge le trí bliana anois, agus is féidir liom stáidéar a dhéanamh ar an Ghaeilge san ollscoil Leipzig sa Ghearmáin.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucaf122

i am using the Irish course and check out my you tube channel Luca fusciardi

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felicity-an-file

Ah ma pensavo che fossi italiano :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scaddher

I read your work and it was great. Congratulations for such an outstanding job. I'm from Mexico and I started learning this beautiful language since I'm planning on living in Ireland someday. I'm putting a lot of effort to accomplish this goal.

Success always.

2 years ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.