"Dw i eisiau cwningen."

Translation:I want a rabbit.

1/28/2016, 3:54:40 PM

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Brighid
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It sounds a lot like the Irish for rabbit - coinín.

1/28/2016, 3:54:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Anneke69
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And the Dutch: konijn

1/28/2016, 4:04:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
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And the English word 'coney'!

1/28/2016, 6:36:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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Wiktionary: all from Latin cunīculus, from Proto-Basque *(H)unči.

1/29/2016, 4:25:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie
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In Hungarian: "nyúl". Okay, I am losing here...

:D

2/3/2016, 8:53:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
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You Hungarians and your non-Indo-European words!

2/7/2016, 11:22:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/workwomanship
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Yup, immediately knew what it was because of German - Kaninchen, and Spanish - conejo

2/3/2016, 10:38:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie
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Do other words exist for hare, bunny, etc, too? If not, aren't these (hare, bunny) also acceptable?

2/5/2016, 4:04:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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A bunny is either cwningen fach (little rabbit) or just bwni (bunny).

A hare is a different animal, in Welsh ysgyfarnog, or sgwarnog more colloquially.

2/5/2016, 4:26:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie
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Thank you! This will be pretty hard for me as in my language there is just a minor difference between rabbit and hare, almost like between duck and mallard in English. We're aware of the difference but all of them are "nyúl". :) (Pronounced as "newl".)

2/6/2016, 8:28:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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Interesting! Hungarian right? I love these kinds of linguistic differences.

The hare is an interesting one in Welsh. It's bigger and wilder than the rabbit. The word ysgyfarnog comes from ysgyfarn (ears) + -og (having) so kind of "having big ears".

We use idioms like mynd ar ôl ysgyfarnog (going after a hare) or hela ysgyfarnog (hunting the hare) to mean "going off on a tangent".

"Hela'r Ysgyfarnog" is also a Welsh folk tune: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUSXHOHhDZ0

2/6/2016, 10:09:58 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RoslynHedges

Is this also how I would order rabbit from a menu? If so, "I want rabbit" is perhaps an acceptable translation?

5/13/2018, 6:14:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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Yes, you're right. If you check out the Welsh side of this menu you'll see that I Ddechrau "For Starters" they have Terîn cwningen gyda siytni afal sbeislyd a thost "Rabbit terrine with spiced apple chutney and toast" (scroll down for English), for which this phrase would be handy.

5/14/2018, 7:19:11 AM
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