"Esgidiau rhedeg"

Translation:Running shoes

2 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/HerrArbo
HerrArbo
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For those who are curious, this literally translates as "running shoes", though the hint for "rhedeg" doesn't say.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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It has added that to the hints. It is there now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elen.f.mia
elen.f.mia
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I'm not sure of the need of insulting Americans. It's fantastic that anyone especially from the States wants to learn Welsh. UK/US translations should be available to enable us to understand the meaning of the Welsh words. Trainers or Sneakers are how I think running shoes (esgidiau rhedeg) should be translated. Some of the pictures throw me off a little too so an adequate translation helps too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hr1982
hr1982
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They're called sneakers in the U.S.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hey1one850
hey1one850
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Sneakers is accepted now as of 1/30/16

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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Out of curiosity; what is the name of the 30th month in Welsh? ;-) ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hey1one850
hey1one850
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You have to love the way Americans refuse to do anything the way the rest of the world does :P. I assume Wales would write that as 30/1/16, wouldn't they?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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Actually, to be fair to them, it is less a case of refusing and more a case of not realising anyone else does anything differently.

I really wouldn't wish to discourage them. Americans wanting to learn another language is a very good thing and should be encouraged.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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In all fairness we Brits are notoriously bad at learning other languages, in general! :-(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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Sadly, it is a stereotype because it is largely true. It is a side-effect of natively speaking a language that everyone else is keen to learn.

In the UK it is also an indication of the decline in support for (modern) foreign languages in the education system here. So it has always been difficult even for those with a keen interest in languages, like myself. The English education system, can't speak for the Scots who have always had a separate system, also made it difficult/impossible to study languages if one was also interested in the sciences.

It always seems to be unappreciated by government. There are occasional attempts to improve the situation / improve uptake/interest, but it is always one of the first areas to face cuts when budgets are squeezed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnReid8
JohnReid8
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In all fairness, being terrible at learning languages is a stereotype that the rest of us have about native English speakers in general, no offence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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Yes. As you say, same as much of the rest of the world. I think some Scandinvian countries use yyyy-mm-dd which is nice and unambiguous.

My real thought was that your earlier comment was from one of the course contributors who used the US format to be welcoming to the Americans; since they were clearly feeling a little disadvantaged not knowing our (English) language. ;-) ;-)

I assume (could be wrong) that all the course contributors are British. Even if not, the fact they speak Welsh would almost certainly mean they would be very aware of British custom. I doubt any of the 5000 Patagonian Welsh speakers would be involved. So I wouldn't expect them to use that format unless they were specifically addressing an American. They would more likely choose to be unambiguous and have written it as 30th Jan, Jan 30th, 1/Jan or Jan/1.

This format issue is no problem if the day is above 12, it's easy to tell, but would 4/1/2016 (or simply 4/1) be 4th Jan or 1st April?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohanAulin

Swede here. We use the ISO standard yyyy-mm-dd formally, but dd/mm yyyy informally. Denmark on the other hand uses the EU standard dd-mm-yyyy formally. That's confusing enough, especially when we shorten it to just yymmdd and ddmmyy respectively.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TyNoOutlet
TyNoOutlet
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When they did the picture thing of this, i was like "what the heck are trainers?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRoofRabbit
TheRoofRabbit
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I know, right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjh4509
rjh4509
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Or tennis shoes. I feel like any of the American terms should be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaLR
DianaLR
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I wasn't sure what "trainers" even were. I also think "tennis shoes" and "sneakers" should be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miacomet
miacomet
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Yep, as well as gym shoes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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How about plimsoles? Or for (English) northerners, pumps?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Are those "running shoes"? Here in the US "pumps" are not and we don't have "plimsoles".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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Or sand shoe, I believe they are known in some parts. Sandshoe in Aus, I believe.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnReid8
JohnReid8
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In New Zealand, "Sand shoe" is generally used as an umbrella term for mufti (non dress and comfortable) shoes.

While you can quite safely run in sand shoes, the term "Running shoes" is reserved for shoes made for running.

Can't speak for the rest of the world of course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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I didn't know that, thanks.

Here 'running shoes' tend to be a specialised form of 'trainers' for those serious about running. More causual runners would use normal trainers for running, playing tennis (specialised tennis shoes are fairly rare now), or just as casual footware. It wouldn't cover all styles of casual shoes though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
kdb119
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Gutties - possibly, for any Scots taking the course. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/huwbinkl

And of course there's always the South Wales "daps" / "dapiau", just to confuse things further!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pips75
Pips75Plus
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In Canada (this part, at least), we call them "sneakers" or "running shoes" (whether they're made for actual running or not).

2 years ago
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