Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Si es posible, él también puede cambiar la orientación de la mesa."

Translation:If possible, he can also change the orientation of the table.

0
5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CherryWill

so what does this mean?

15
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrederickEason
FrederickEason
  • 25
  • 23
  • 20
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 307

it means that if it´s possible to change the orientation of the table, he is allowed to change it if he wishes.

9
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaroberts24

I think the question is: Why is the table's orientation being changed? What does that mean?

8
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrederickEason
FrederickEason
  • 25
  • 23
  • 20
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 307

It means the table is being rotated.

15
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
  • 25
  • 14
  • 8
  • 197

Or, as is more common in English, we say 'turn the table'. It is an idiom even, as in:

Black Bart --Ah ha! You didn't find this gun I hid in my boot!

Marshall duGood-- Drats, you turned the tables on me again!

14
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaroberts24

That's just weird. Haha. Why would you rotate a table? Sometimes, the examples are strange in here and it makes you double guess your translation.

6
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

I can think of a number of real life situations wherein such a sentence would make perfect sense.

23
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itastudent
itastudent
  • 17
  • 14
  • 10
  • 9
  • 2

You know, a lot of times people need to rotate tables while arranging parties or just while moving to a new apartment. This could be a sentence from a conversation among them.

12
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
  • 25
  • 14
  • 3
  • 1973

It probable just means turn it 90 degrees or so. Since a table usually has symmetry and is often longer than it is wide.

8
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertNutt5

Then why not use "alredador"?

0
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Realejo
Realejo
  • 21
  • 20
  • 19
  • 19
  • 17
  • 10

Imagine sitting in a restaurant, you turn around and discover the little TV in the corner and see your favorite soccer team playing an important match. But it's umconfortable to watch from your decision, so you ask the waiter if he could help you 'change the orientation of the table' and the chairs as well. (or you could just take a seat somewhere else ;) )

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bettybholmes

Couldn't the word "position" be used here, rather than "orientation"?

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerthehun

position to me implies moving the table somewhere else, whereas orientation implies rotating it to a different angle relative to the room but not necessarily moving it.

10
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

I can`t think of anyone who would say, when speaking English, they will/can change the orientation of the table. We would say turn it around, or change the position etc.

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I was thinking the same thing. I would understand if someone said the "orientation" of the table, but it sounds weird to me. I would think that someone would use "position" or "placement".

And, in response to tylerthehun, I would say "move the table" to mean another location in the room; I would not use position, which to me implies keeping it in the same spot, but rotating it.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerthehun

True, orientation sounds very awkward in this context in english, but as a translation it can't mean anything else in my mind. To me, using position also sounds like a new location. The only ways I would say "change the orientation" would be to turn or rotate. To be more specific I might say orient or align with something, say a wall or a door.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
  • 20
  • 18
  • 9
  • 9
  • 4
  • 990

That would not be very accurate. "Position" = "posición".

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Luís, you are, of course, correct that there is another word in Spanish that corresponds more directly to the word position in English. But, for some of us (as indicated in these comments), using "orientation" (in English) for a table does not sound natural.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/briecee
briecee
  • 16
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3

Just because two words are cognates doesn't mean they are the most accurate translation for each other. I'm a native English speaker, and I would only change a table's "orientation" if I were using some kind of CAD software and rotating the drawing of the table to hang from the ceiling or something. In the house, I'd just "move" or "turn" it.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolinguo

true

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

If DL had only written " va a" ( will/is going to) instead of puede, this would have made a whole lot more sense.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6

Agreed. The topic of re-orientating tables aside, the really strange part of this sentence in English is the "if possible" at the start. "If possible he can..." is saying if he can do it, then he can do it. Weird. "If possible he will..." makes much more sense.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
  • 17
  • 13
  • 6
  • 2

Maybe he wants permission to re-arrange your furniture for a party or something, and you think your table might be too heavy for him to move. That's all I can come up with.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6

I get your thinking. With a possibility of achieving something AND a permission, the redundancy of effectively saying "If he can, he can ..." is avoided. I can't imagine DL was being that clever though and "If he can, he will ..." makes much more sense, in English at least.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pannychis

i found a table on which it would fit perfectly

http://9gag.com/gag/aNez9qA

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idanruf1

It seems like only yesterday we were given sentences like "El niño bebe leche".

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariixxx

Why is it not 'Yes, it's possible ..'

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

While pronounced the same, si (no accent mark) is "if" and (with accent mark) is "yes" ... in spoken Spanish, the meaning is determined by context.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 378

In the spanish version, are there any other variations where one may put the word también, I am always confused about its placement in any sentence...Are there rules attached for that?

1
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6

Not a native speaker, but I'm pretty sure:

If the adverb immediately precedes the verb this emphasises the adverb: él también puede cambiar la orientación de la mesa.

The adverb could also be put after the verb to emphasise the verb: él puede cambiar también la orientación de la mesa.

Sometimes the adverb can also be promoted to the start of the sentence to prioritise it, or relegated to the end of the sentence to place the least emphasis on it, but I'd be reluctant to do either with this sentence as I get the feeling it could cause ambiguity.

The only places it definitely can't go are within the object phrase "la orientación de la mesa" or within the verb phrase "puede cambiar".

1
Reply13 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 378

Very helpful, and I thank you..

1
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drepple
drepple
  • 23
  • 17
  • 10

It looks like this does not mean that he is an additional person who can do this. So would we say "...también él puede cambiar..." to express that he too can do what others do?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Librasulus
Librasulus
  • 22
  • 19
  • 15
  • 2

shouldn't the translation "If possible, he may also change the orientation of the table" be correct too, as "may" can also interpreted as ability or permission? Regardless that it can also express chance.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/briecee
briecee
  • 16
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3

I don't think so. The subjunctive mood of the "if" could carry forward to the rest of the sentence, but that would turn "can" to "could", not "may" (or its subjunctive cousin, "might").

0
Reply4 years ago