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  5. "I do not like Friday."

"I do not like Friday."

Translation:Dw i ddim yn hoffi dydd Gwener.

January 29, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deeann333

I think dw i/dydw i/rydw i are all just dialect variations on "I am"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mundgeirr

If i am not mistaken "Rydw i" would be affirmative "I am" and "Dydw i" the negative form of I am, to write later ddim, Dydw i ddim (I am not). The coloquial form Dw i would be valid for both affirmative and negative sentences. Sorry in advance if I made any mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Esse-Honorem

So many variations in Welsh pronouns!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flinnian

haha yeah I'm confused too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anneke69
  1. Dw i ddim yn hoffi dydd Gwener.

  2. Dydw i ddim yn licio dydd Gwener.

  3. Dydw i ddim yn hoffi dydd Gwener.

So, all the above options are correct, but we hadn't learnt anything about 'dydw'. This is happening all the time. Very confusing and frustrating, when they teach something and then throw in words in the test that they haven't taught (yet).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrevorDur

This is a ridiculous way to teach. (multiple choice with versions which are never taught)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kimkimmy104

I agree. Never seen Dydw before. Very frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moonshinediva

I was taught dydw i 25 yrs ago when teaching was very proper, this is much more colloquial and enjoyable. Licio is also used in Sth Wales, principle is if you can't remember the Welsh stick io on the end of the English using Welsh spelling i.e jumpio - jump, sgipio - skip. Its Wenglish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annispenc

"Dw i ddim yn licio dydd Gwener" is the correct answer, but I was wondering what "yn licio" meant, because I don't remember learning about this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deeann333

I think it also means "like", just like "yn hoffi". In fact, it's borrowed from the English verb "like".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamonLordAuthor

"licio" it's given in a later lesson on dialect, as a variant of "hoffi"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beccah123

I've been taught welsh for 14 years and I've never heard the word 'licio' ever


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/js1966

I started a Welsh course a couple of years ago and yn licio was used instead of yn hoffi for "to like" - but I'd chosen to do the North Welsh dialect course, so am guessing that South Wales use yn hoffi instead but both are acceptable versions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonnyValleyBoy

I was taught "Hoffwn i ddim" Am I missing something here?

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