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"El martes mis amigos y yo tocamos violín."

Translation:On Tuesday my friends and I play violin.

5 years ago

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

The sentence in Spanish is incorrect (at least in Spain). A defined article is needed before the instrument: Toco la guitarra, el piano, el bajo y la batería.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaspet

Why not "my friends and I play the violin on Tuesdays"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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That's an incorrect translation because "martes" is singular here. Your sentence in Spanish, would be "Los martes mis amigos y yo tocamos violín".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smileyben
Smileyben
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Sorry, but I think you're wrong. In English you never say 'On Tuesday we play violin' (unless you're using it as a future implying intention). If it's a regular event, you'd have to say 'On Tuesdays we play violin'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MindBullitz

I agree with Jaspet and Ben. "We play" here in the present tense would really only make sense if it was a regularly occurring weekly event. If it's only referring to playing this Tuesday, then a much more appropriate tense to use may be the future tense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackHeart01
BlackHeart01
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then, the correct answer would be "We will play violin on tuesday" right?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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Effnus, i must disagree. 'Tuesday my friend and i play the violin,' sounds completely awkward. It may be grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound like it to me.

If you play every Tuesday, then Tuesday would be plural. If it was a single event in the future, then you would use the future tense (in English.)

Maybe it's a regional difference?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asknoone

You are right! It has to be "will" if we are talking about the future.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effnus

MissSpell, it may sound awkward but it is perfectly correct. I think part of the difficulty here is that the sentence is out of context so we're trying to determine what is meant. But think of this example, Tuesday is your birthday. Or, Tuesday we go to the fair. I don't know if you're a native English speaker :), but at least here in the US we would not necessarily use the preposition"on" in this sentence.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhicks56

Thanks. That helped a lot.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyG
MikeyG
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If it's a day of the week it doesn't lose it's "s" when it's singular.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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Not in Spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dac123
dac123
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What do you mean? "Tuesday" is singular. "Tuesdays" is plural (more than one Tuesday).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lovestoread

I think he means if you're talking about a regularly scheduled event, something you do every Tuesday. In English, we would translate that as "on Tuesdays," even if the word Tuesday is singular in the Spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/realhun
realhun
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I don't understand the absence of the spanish version of the english word "On". We say in english "On Tuesday..." but "El martes..." is "The Tuesday", so where is "on"? Or in this case "El martes" means "The Tuesday" and "On Tuesday" also?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

We Spanish people wonder why on is used in English for the same reason, if the events are not physically on top of the day. It is just the way people speak and build the language. In Spanish you may hear several particles such as en, el, los... each one in particular structures.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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It's funny that you say that because I always imagine an event ON the specific day ON an actual calendar. (in my head) I guess I can't see past my language.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effnus

You would only say "on Tuesday" if you meant the coming Tuesday. Or I should say it is an option. It is perfectly correct to just say Tuesday, with the understanding that you are talking about the one coming up.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiquidJ

I don't think this sentence makes sense in the present tense. Since this refers to a specific Tuesday and not all Tuesdays, it would need to be in the past or future tense.

Example: On Tuesday my friends and I will play the violin. On Tuesday my friends and I played the violin.

Vs

On Tuesdays my friends and I play the violin.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesoraWright

In response to the questions, Are you playing on Tuesday or Wednesday? It would make sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hadorco

shouldn't it be "tocamos EL violin"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

That is what I stated in a previous comment. The article is needed.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hadorco

yup now i see that u wrote that.. thanks.. so its the same as in english (we play THE guitar/piano/etc)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Exactly. However, there are other kinds of sentences where this does not apply, such as jobs.

Soy doctor - I am [a] doctor.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/6389intransit

I'm not sure the article is needed even in the subject sentence. Certainly, it is not always used in English. For instance:

"Do you play piano in your group?" "Yes, I usually play piano. But on Tuesdays I play violin."

Grammatically correct or not, this is the the way some people (but not all people) talk in English. Presumably they do the same in Spanish.

So if we are translating, we have to pay attention first to what has actually been said, not to what we think should have been said.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Principito_Rojo

I dunno, I'm going to have to agree with the NATIVE SPEAKER, at least when it comes to PROPER grammar.

No one should just assume that one language will use similar syntax to another because it "just sounds right" in your native tongue, at least for the purpose of learning. :/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Just for fun, in light of other usages on DL i put "...me and my friends play violin". Wrong! But, you can hear that kind of phrase on almost every street in England.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eusoumeurei
eusoumeurei
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I think they played last Tuesday, so: "On Tuesday my friends and I played the violin."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asknoone

I did it again ... It has to be "will" if we are talking about the future.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geogator

tacamos = play Seems like an idiom to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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It's one of the meanings of the word.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

They "touch" instruments and we "play" them. Neither of those is the usual literal meaning of the respective words. They're both being stretched a bit to briefly describe how you use an instrument.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricLindros

My guess was: This Tuesday my friends and I play the violin.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smileyben
Smileyben
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Yes, but that isn't a well-formed English sentence. Except with a future tense sense of "I will play..."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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There is no reference to which Tuesday is being talked about

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qwertre
qwertre
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Can "violin" really mean both violin and stench in Spanish?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

I've noticed the speaker often partially swallows the "o" in "yo". Is that normal and i should just get used to it, or is it a problem with the program?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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It may be a bit swallowed, but it sounds acceptable to me (native Spanish speaker).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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When y and yo come together, i usually cannot (at least on DL) understand it. And in this sentence they both blended rapidly with tocamos. It is as though "yyotocamos" is just one weird sounding exotic word. Seven months of continual Spanish study and several months on DL and my comprehension skills improve (do they?) at the speed of a snail. Too bad life doesn't come with a "SLOW" button. I can just see myself standing in a bus station in Columbia saying to someone, "Pardon, let me hit your slow button, senor. Gracias."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LauritaPepita

I thought el meant the... ("the" is the only thing in the drop-down menu) this keeps happening... I'm losing heart...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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I wish duolingo had lessons and explanations, not just tests. El, la, los, and las all mean 'the.' It's just that prepositions are weird in any language. (according to one of my favorite professors) In english we say 'on' a day of the week. According to Santi_Minstrel above, that sounds weird to a spanish speaker.

I like this explanation from aboutspanish:

"Except in constructions where the day of the week follows a form of ser (a verb for "to be"), as in hoy es martes (today is Tuesday), the article is needed. Vamos a la escuela los lunes. (We go to school on Mondays.) El tren sale el miércoles. (The train leaves on Wednesday.)"

http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/intro_def_art.htm

I've seen possible exceptions to this rule, but in general, I find it to be accurate.

Also, just always assume that English and Spanish prepositions don't really translate. (Not without long complicated answers.) Just try to remember specific usage and imitate because the logic behind them is an illusion.

Don't believe me? Why do we say ON Wednesday, but IN July?

(don't loose heart! You just have to think of duolingo in a different way. It can't be you're primary source for learning Spanish because it doesn't actually have lessons.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ocnic

It's hard to have a section on time when the past and present tense haven't been introduced yet.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliewilman
lesliewilman
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Quite right, but as it happens "tocamos" is also the form of the preterite tense, which in the 1st person plural only of -ar verbs is exactly the same as the present. Perhaps they borrowed this from a bank of sentences and stuck it in the "verbs present exercise" - a little carelessly -and it means "On Tuesday my friends and I played (the) violin."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rationalfreak

So this refers to the nearest Tuesday? Could this also be rephrased as "El martes mis amigos y yo tocaremos el violín" or "El martes mis amigos y yo vamos a tocar el violín"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rrizzlaa

why does it translate to "play instruments", if that is the case shouldn't the sentence use the verb "jugar"??

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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"Jugar" means "to play" as in "to play with the ball". It does not mean "to play an instrument". In Spanish you use the verb "tocar" for that (which can mean both "to play" and "to touch").

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loikki

I thought it was supposed to be "...e yo...", not "...y yo...". So apparently you can say it with this double y sound?

2 years ago