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  5. "Dw i'n hoffi coffi a dŵr."

"Dw i'n hoffi coffi a dŵr."

Translation:I like coffee and water.

January 29, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

But coffi IS mostly dŵr!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoelGoetowski

Maybe it's referring to Americano?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

It never ceases to amuse me that Americans were so wussy about their coffee that they got the process of watering it down named after them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoelGoetowski

Me either. I just eat it straight from the can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ammonoosuc

Can I use the verb "licio" and "hoffi" interchangeably to mean "like"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xXBad_WolfXx

So, I checked my first dictionary, and it didn't even KNOW the word licio, so I checked my OTHER online dictionary, and it defines "licio" as "hoffi." (Source: http://geiriadur.ac.uk/gpc/gpc.html )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Yeah, licio is just an informal variation of hoffi. Both mean the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AguaMenri

Who in life does not love water? He'd be a suicide


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twilliams0731

Could this be used to order food and drink? I obviously know "Ga i" but could i use this for more ways to say the same thing? Morely what i'm asking is can "like" in this form, be used to say "want" as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

No, Dw i'n hoffi is simply "I like" i.e. present tense.

"I'd like" is Hoffwn i i.e. the same verb but conditional tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twilliams0731

I morely meant hoffi the word in general, but either way answered my question, diolch!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_Andersson

Because "dw i'n" is just a shortened form of "dw i yn", "Dw i yn hoffi coffi a dŵr" should be accepted. Right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

Not a native, and I'm not 100% sure, but I think contractions of the leading "y" in two letter words like "yn" and "yr" are mandatory. E.g., Dw i yn hoffi yr afal is wrong and it has to be dw i'n hoffi'r afal.

Sort of like French; "je aime, uses the right words, but it's wrong like that and it has to be "j'aime."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

You're right. Unless you're trying to emphasise a particular word, Dw i yn hoffi yr afal would be weird, and well, wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_Andersson

Interesting theory, although I am not sure I understood it. The only "y" in "Dw i yn hoffi coffi a dŵr" is in "yn", why would that be shortened to "Dw i'n hoffi coffi a dŵr"? ☺

In this discussion (https://goo.gl/rHWcUG) I asked the same question. Ellis Vaughan, native in Cymraeg, argues that "dw i yn" "..is strange...", rare and often replaced by "dw i'n" in practice. She/he also argues that Dewi Lingo shouldn't been teaching us "dw i yn", but is it and even recommended. In this unit (https://goo.gl/EKlNAQ), there is a task to translates "Nac ydw, dw i ddim hoffi swper" to "No, I do not like supper".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/areddragon

Maybe they've changed it since, or I'm misunderstanding this statement; but "Nac ydw, dw i ddim yn hoffi swper" is correct, since the yn isn't following a vowel, it can't be contracted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cakeordeath11

now that's more like it. much better than that coffee and lemon nonsense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strobro3

like mixed together?


[deactivated user]

    Surely not. Would that not get it all wet?

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