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  5. "El amor es ciego, pero los v…

"El amor es ciego, pero los vecinos no."

Translation:Love is blind, but the neighbors ain't.

December 21, 2013

214 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjordzhenvogh

This is definitely an idiom I've never encountered. At least, not the second half.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

I have seen Spanish language cartoons using this idiom -- a couple having sex at the living room window. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/11AndrewSmith11

I think it refers to the fact that when someone's "In love", they can be blind to a logical perspective seen from the outside (neighbors). Especially those negative relationships we try and warn our friends and family about :p haha

PS: Spanish cartoons sound way better than American cartoons!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackhammond

You should get Mod, I see you in every comment section.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly-Rose

No it is actually what the idiom is referring to; unwanted maybe, but not irrelevant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R.Ocho8

is it possible that my Spanish is incoherent to the bot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R.Ocho8

ty, I suck at this...I mean Mucho gusto?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kburns421

I've never heard the second half either. Maybe it's something commonly used in Spanish but not English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob906633

This is a common saying for older english speaking people. Meaning the person in love can't see the problems in their relationship that everyone around them can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DORAGARCIA204924

Hola. Esta frase en Mexico significa que las personas que te rodean estan al pendiente de tus acciones. Y si haces algo mal, siempre habra alguien que te vio hacerlo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loofoo
  • 1618

As a native Spanish speaker, I've never heard this before. These idioms are very random... with so many different countries speaking different variations of Spanish this must be fairly common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

It would be really helpful if the idioms were accompanied by some info. on where they are common, since, as you note, there are so many varieties of Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megustamivida

and so many variations of english! Talk about a recipe for confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeIvory

I don't think English varies anywhere near as much as Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlaquest

Agreed! That's something I wish Duolingo would do for all the Spanish lessons, not just the idioms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjduncan2

CONGRATS ON YOUR YEAR LONG STREAK!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Thanks for noticing! :


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PepperMint401545

Whoa! Do you really speak all those languages! I'm super impressed! Which is you first language? And you're right. You know how they have an "Explain" button for words? What about idioms, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Also, I saw your lingot-begging post. Gave you a few too. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

No, I just study them. :) Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Unless you are familiar with Noel Clarasó you will not have heard the second half of this. It's a quote from him and not really an adage at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

That's because it's a quote, not a proverb like most of these and definitely not an idiom. It's attributed to Noel Clarasó.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamaud

Well known in the UK


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

And in my part of the US as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TripCode

Given the apparent proliferation of idioms that the UK and the Southern part of the US seem to share, I am not surprised that this is something I as a Southerner recognize that is also heard across the pond.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

Very common where I'm from. As a matter of fact some wag wrote it in my High School yearbook as a poem. "Don't make love near the garden gate, for love is blind but the neighbors ain't"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

This is NOT the same. The clause "don't make love by the garden gate" changes the meaning entirely and it's not equivalent. Your sentence has to do with PDA and the original has to do with being blind to our loved-one's faults. Not the same thing at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

This is a quote, not an idiom. Noel Clarasó is the author. Actually lots of these are not idioms but proverbs or adages. El amor es ciego is the actual axiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dar320

Mismo, aqui. It just means pull down the shades. Its cute and memorable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mateomijo

Me neither; native speaker, American


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

It is disturbing to see a translation using the nonstandard English word "ain't." All schools in the U. S. teach that this word is nonstandard, is often used by illiterate people, and is not to be used in scholastic and business writing. In my opinion and the opinion of all the English teachers I ever knew, it makes a bad impression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krashman

I wouldn't use it in normal conversation, but I would absolutely use it in idioms. E.g. "Ain't that a bitch," "there ain't no rest for the wicked," or "ain't nobody got time for that."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GRoppolo1

I'm sorry... ain't nobody got time for that is an idiom now?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrienneOrlando

Yes. Attributed to Ms. Sweet Brown, witness to (and victim of) an apartment fire that was broadcast on the news. She said, "I got bronchitis! Ain't nobody got time for that!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momo4488

That's a meme, not an idiom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You're right, none of those are idioms. An idiom is something you won't necessarily understand even if you know all the words. "To pass the buck," "To be hoisted on one's own petard," "To be at sixes and sevens," "To be thin skinned," "To be on cloud 9," are all true idioms. I wish this section had focused on that and not on maxims or sayings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnjeTheNerd

It would work fine in idioms, but this isn't an idiom in English, as far as I've heard in my 30-odd years of speaking it natively.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

You're not old enough. I heard it all the time as a kid. It has gone out of style, but it was a very popular idiom at one time, and still is in some regions. It was actually popularized by the Lil Abner Comic strip, although it didn't originate there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drumknott

"Don't make love by the garden gate - love may be blind, but the neighbors ain't."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valgal707

Is it perhaps that the "pero los vecinos no" part is a comparably sub-standard way of speaking? Can Spanish speakers perhaps tell us?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AurosHarman

I think that's exactly it. If it were "proper", it would be "pero los vecinos no son" or "pero no son los vecinos". The omission of the actual verb in the latter clause makes it more like English "ain't" -- obviously comprehensible, but very casual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuirkyRabbit

I remember seeing "pero yo no" after a comma in another exercise. I suppose there is a verb in the second half but it's implied, in this case "ser" which appears as "es" in the first half. I'm not a native speaker so I can't say if this is proper/regional usage or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaolan77

It's probably not great Spanish but it's certainly used. My friends use 'pero yo no' all the time. I get the impression it's used when you're being flippant but then again Latinos are very frank and don't beat around the bush when they're talking either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-_Matthew-_

Nobody has time for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEliseF

Fully agree. I am an English teacher. "Ain't" is slang (in itself a slang word ;)), however as the saying was originally coined among the poorer peoples (richer people have more input from parents and other family members) ain't is the only way I have ever heard this phrase


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

I agree, but would like to stress that your example is of written dialogue (or so I presume from the quotes), rather than an example of a professional or scholarly piece of writing. The use of "ain't" in a story is to show that someone either is poorly educated or is deliberately playing with English in order to be cool or neat.

In fact, I myself might use "ain't" in normal conversation with a close friend or family member if I wanted to be playful, funny, or idiomatic, or if I were certain that my friend or family member absolutely knew that I was aware of the correct wording (am not). I would never use "ain't" if I were with a stranger. It is my preference to hold myself to a higher standard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krashman

Of course I wouldn't use "ain't" in a professional or scholarly piece of writing (except possibly in quotes). On the other hand, neither would I use "wouldn't." I would also never use the term "a stitch in time" except as part of or in reference to the idiom it begins. The point I was trying to make is that idioms come with their own language; they are passed along verbatim regardless of "correct" grammar. You're welcome to use or not use whatever language you choose, but when you condemn DL for its idiomatic phrasing I'm afraid you lose me. For what it's worth, I would cheerfully use the phrase "there ain't no rest for the wicked" in front of someone I'd just met. Even if I thought such a usage might affect someone's opinion (I don't), it's not important to me that everyone I meet be able to successfully intuit my education level.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

Dat right. Never met a phrase that I didn't like, and when you talked about the sentence "There ain't no rest for the wicked," I assumed that you like to play with language just as much as I do. It's fun. Personally, I like the proverb when it is used in the right setting.

I must ask, do you think I was trying to impress anyone with my so-so education? Not so. Rather, I was trying to illustrate that good job interviews can go sour because of nonstandard English. My husband hires for the skills someone possesses, but when he has to choose between two equally skilled individuals, he always chooses the one who speaks better. I don't understand what's wrong with not wanting to make a bad impression. It's not a matter of snobbery, it's a matter of personal economics. You never know who might hear you and help you get that next great job.

Finally, with is it with you and the word "wouldn't?" Didn't you start your first sentence with "Of course I wouldn't… ? "I'm not trying to offend you; it's just that bit about "wouldn't" that is confusing me. I always thought it was polite to speak in a conditional tense. ;->


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krashman

Gah. I typed up a thoughtful reply and it seems to have failed to post. The upshot:

I wouldn't use "ain't" at a job interview, but I didn't think that was what we were discussing. If I were teaching a new English speaker idioms, I would use traditional word choices.

"Wouldn't" was my example precisely because I had just used it. Contractions are traditionally frowned upon in formal writing, but I would still use them in informal contexts and still teach them to a new speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jb4292

Using "ain't" isn't always related someone's income or education. Sometimes it's just a dialect/regional/cultural thing. It's not exactly considered "proper" English, but I use it around my friends and family all the time. I'm a stickler for proper English in formal documents and situations myself, but I love using slang because it feels laid back and "homey" to me. It's called code switching. Lots of people do it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FigTwig

Well it also accepts "Love is blind, but the neighbors aren't" if that makes anyone feel better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PniB

ha ha :) I find it so frustrating when I am trying to find information about Spanish, of course related to current sentence, phrase, etc. and all I find is comment after comment discussing the english. Although there is a chance that I have contributed to such a conversation myself ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megustamivida

excellent point, and I am definitely guilty. It's just because I love language that I find this fascinating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlaquest

It accepted "Love is blind, but not the neighbors" for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rdc640

Probably not the best english though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHazard

I'd be careful when categorically stating a word is only "used by illiterate people" etc. and "leave a very, very bad impression." It is quite acceptable in some spoken dialects. In the 18th century it was acceptable in educated circles.

Today, of course, it cannot be used in academic or journalistic writing, but that does not demote the word to "illiterate people who know no better." I speak as a wordsmith, and I ain't about to drop the word from my lexicon.

References: Read "The Story of Ain't" or see the controversy surrounding Webster's Third, published in 1961. The dictionary tried to bring back "ain't" into educated circles, and said it was "used orally in most parts of the U.S. by cultivated speakers. No, no se dice que otros.

Good on Duolingo for offering the word as a translation choice! Aprendemos de estos modismos peculiares.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

"Cada loco, es su tema." If I am definite in standing by my opinions, it is because I believe fervently that it is a disservice to ESL learners to model nonstandard English to them. My rationales:

1) If duoLingo is a site where people who don't speak a language can learn it for free, then they need to know what is standard and what is nonstandard in the 21st Century. If English-speaking people who love their native tongue choose nonstandard words to pepper their own writing and conversations, then that is their prerogative. I only hope that the people whose first language is Spanish don't share your sentiment when they are participating in these posts because I, myself, want to learn the most polished Spanish that I can. I imagine that many people learning English as a second language share my sentiment.

2) The word "ain't" does leave a bad impression, kind of like when a person uses the familiar Spanish form of "tú" when he should be using "usted." Quite simply, a bad impression is a bad impression, no matter why or how one makes it. I don't want someone modeling that kind of language for me to emulate.

Because my choice of language was rant provoking, I have changed "used only by illiterate people who know no better" to "used often by illiterate people," mainly because of the many people who take umbrage so easily. If I offended you, perhaps because you consider yourself literate and yet still like using the word "ain't" for some unspecified reason (and here, I wish to state sincerely that I am NOT implying that you are not literate), I apologize for the implication, which was entirely unintended on my part. (By the way, you still do have the option to use the word "ain't." I wasn't taking that away from you. Creative writing would be far less entertaining without nonstandard words.)

Speaking as a wordsmith myself, I would have been much more impressed by your abilities if you had capitalized "century" in "18th Century." I always try to be as meticulous as possible when I write and speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHazard

Points taken.

Your words, by the way, were not "rant-provoking." Whether I'm illiterate or not is irrelevant; we're discussing the use of the word "ain't" and my argument stands or falls on the arguments I use.

Your last remark, even if it was correct, is an ad hominem tu quoque fallacy (i.e, it's off topic and aimed at reducing my argument through an attack on a separate issue and, by inference, my abilities.)

This reduces the effectiveness of your response. More to the point it's far from a hard-and-fast rule. Most stylebooks (Chicago Manual of Style, the Canadian Press Stylebook, the MLA, etc.) lower case "century" in this and other contexts. However, a few require upper-casing "century."

A largo plazo, de manera similar a los estilos de vida, me parece más emocionante de disfrutar de diferentes estilos de escritura. Para usar su palabra, "meticuloso" es bueno. Didáctica no lo es.

Feliz aprendizaje español!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

True dat, but I wasn't saying that YOU ranted. (You seem to take everything personally.) Rather, I meant that I got a lot of negative feedback because of my straightforwardness. I agree, however, that both of our arguments about the word "ain't" stand and fall on their own merits, despite that fact that my copy of Chicago Manual of Style may now be out of date.

Now that I know you're Canadian, it all makes sense. (I am not disparaging Canadians here.) American, Canadian, and British grammar rules are simply not the same. I admittedly am less knowledgeable about Canadian dialects. The United States dialect of English, on the other hand, is what I mastered in order to make a living, and my admittedly small sample of teachers, professors, and colleagues all agreed that "ain't" is best avoided.

In response to your snarky "ad hominem tu quoque" remark, I must admit that I was prideful when I stooped to pettiness. I will respond with the precept I try (sometimes unsuccessfully) to follow: Right action leads to right thinking, and right thinking leads to right action. Let's just agree to disagree, eh? ;^) lh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

This conversation is cracking me up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHazard

Sounds like a plan! Cheers, eh! (That's my British/Canadian getting confused.)

P.S. re British, Canadian and American rules. Indeed they do differ. But they often agree on the essentials. Canadians waffle between U.S. and Brit, with mostly Brit spellings, but many American borrowings of style and punctuation. (For example, scare quotes at the end of sentences: Brits: full stop outside quotes. U.S.: inside. Canadians: we follow the U.S. Spellings: only on odd words like aluminum/aluminium do we differ from the Brits.

Now back to Spanish :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tbs_

Do you use a monocle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norwegiannorm

However this sentence is in the Spanish for English speakers course, so.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Idioms and colloquial language often use nonstandard grammar. Ain't no lie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katemonster

Notice that Duolingo doesn't use "ain't" in any of its other translations. This lesson is about idioms and colloquial phrases, not about scholastic and business writing. Plus, it's completely optional. If you are that disturbed by colloquial speech, I urge you to just move on to another lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/germano_germino

Idioms are "folk-proverbs" which usually convey wisdom by the means of memory hooks - one of them being rhymes. Correct grammar or spelling is usually not only not relevant for them but sometimes little errors can serve as mnemonics themselves. So my simple explanation is that "blind" and "ain't" rhyme.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nasair

It is in the dictionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mom2aaroncarter

this is a super racist and classist response. many dialects use ain't, and the topic here is idioms!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

Classist? Racist? Really? You make a lot of assumptions. All this name calling just because you want me to approve of the word "ain't?" Well, if it will make you happy, I'll just have to say it: I ain't got time for this anymore! Also, having reread this thread again after a few months, I again got rid of some of the more incendiary wording. All of us have, because we don't really want to flame, we just are passionate about language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meierlw

It's slang, I agree that it is improper but it still used in certain conversational language in the US in the south. For example, sometimes I say "It ain't gonna fix itself" this is incorrect but it's fun local thing to say. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DareAllen

Yeah, really duo? You actually want me to say "ain't"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jalepenito

I love the word ain't and can't wait to use it again now that I see duo accepts it. I hope y'all will do the same. Languages are living things. The fun stops when we forget that. I like to say Howdy instead of Hi. I tend to swallow Hi and people can't hear me. Plus I figure it weeds out the snobs. When it comes to languages my hero is any 6 year-old. Except in English, they speak better than I do even with any and all mistakes. When I was living and studying in France I heard "C'est pas..." on the street. When I asked my French teacher about it, she wouldn't acknowledge what it meant. She would only say, "No, it's 'Ce n'est pas..." FYI C'est and Ce sound the same. She did it three times and I just walked away. If we were in the US then fine, but she did nothing to help me communicate with people. Another example is "Tu as vu?" which gets compressed to "T'as vu?" Gotta say, I love this saying. This new (to me) or full version has alot ( :-) ) of wisdom in it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luv_star99

I put "the love is blind" , you know, because they put "el amor" and that was my last strike... :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/witchietaitai

I just heard this idiom used in an episode of Criminal Minds. The profilers were in Mexico looking for a serial killer. It was translated on the show as "Love is blind but the neighbors are not"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ_Mc

What in this sentence comprises the word "ain't"? That is, what would be the incorrect Spanish just as "ain't" is incorrect English? It simply looks to me (as a beginner) that "Love is blind but the neighbors are not."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2676

"Ain't" is not incorrect, it is merely non-standard and informal.

That said, the entire thing is just a figure of speech. Don't expect a full word-for-word translation where one isolated bit in one language exactly corresponds to an isolated bit in the other language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ_Mc

First of all, I can't figure out what kind of order these comments follow. I would have thought my comment and your reply would have been at the bottom of the list.

But to my question, I guess what I'm asking is that when this is said in Spanish, is there something very informal about it as there would be if we said "Ain't love wonderful?" I was trying to get to what makes this sentence so informal that the translation would include "ain't"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2676

Comments are ordered by how upvoted they are.

When it comes to things like this, it's more a matter of that's just what the equivalent expression is. Register of speech is secondary here. It's not like "Hello, how are you?" vs "Yo, 'sup?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ_Mc

Not to be difficult, but I think it would be important to know if I were saying the equivalent of "Yo, 'sup?" as opposed to "Hello, how are you?" Can I assume DuoLingo is not going to teach me something that would be inappropriate in certain company?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrapHagga

Ain't ain't a word so I ain't gonna say it!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Summertime1001

it doesnt except "but the neighbours ARE NOT, it has to be AINT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You need to report it to Duolingo. They will change it if enough people report the problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1092031855

Never heard of it before in any language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleEv9

I thought these would be actual Spanish Idioms.. these are all American/ English ones translated into Spanish...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

I'm with you. Most of these aren't even idioms but rather proverbs or adages. An idiom is something like "to kick the bucket" or "to raise Caine" or " to raise a red flag" or " to hoist by one's own petard". It's an expression where you can't necessarily know or even guess the meaning from the words alone.

I learned several good ones in Dutch. "Hij ligt op apegapen" literally to lie gasping like an ape meaning dead tired or at your last gasp. Or "de pijp uit gaan" litterally to go out of the pipe... meaning to die.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PniB

Can anyone out there who is a spanish speaker please explain to me what this idiom is usually meant to express? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

I thought it might be the same as "Love is blind" with the added tag meaning "but those who aren't in love can see the loved one's qualities more clearly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judohelen

I think: Don't do PDA's--public displays of affection. Right? Would you say it to a couple making out in the hallway?--or about them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FLchick

I'd rather say, "Ain't love grand".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luv_star99

I put "the love is blind" , you know, because they put "el amor" and that was my last strike... :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KHollywood1

I never heard it before either but it makes perfect sense depending on your wisdom I guess! What it means is ...Say for instance someone is getting beat by her husband but she stays and if you ask why of course she will no doubt say CAUSE I LOVE HIM! ((SHE IS BLINDED BY LOVE)) so much so she stays!! HOWEVER the neighbors see and hear everything very clear and they don't love him so they are not blinded and see him for the ass that he is. (It's a metaphor / analogy) OKAY HAVE YOU EVER HAD A GIRLFRIEND THAT WAS A PSYCHO AND YOUR FRIENDS TRIED TO TELL YOU BUT ... NOOOOO BECAUSE YOU LOVED HER SO YOU STAYED ....Then one day it hit you F this broad cause you either opened your eyes or she dumped you and you were forced to get over it basically ... Now you might laugh at it now like OMG I can't believe I tripped over that whore monger ... GET IT? YOU ARE IN THE PICTURE! SO YOU CAN'T STEP BACK AND SEE IT FOR EVERYTHING IN IT BUT OTHERS CAN CAUSE IT'S IN FRONT OF THEM ... KEYWORDS : METAPHOR / ANALOGY


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyzono

El means the right, well i even hovered over it and it said the


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2676

Yes, but different languages have different grammar rules. In Spanish you need to say "El amor", but in English "the love" does not sound natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim4Portuguese

"Love is blind" is very common in England but the bit about the neighbours sound like something muy de pueblo in Spain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEliseF

Definitely used in English. My parents (both from Kent) used it regularly. I think it is just a case that in more recent years it has become shortened, initially because people assumed that the rest of the idiom was known and then, as is being shown here, because it was not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nvdoren

Here's the whole thing:"Never kiss by the garden gate./ Love may be blind but the neighbors ain't." So, my mother informed me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuperStinkyButt

why is it neighbors aint not are not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2676

Because it's an idiom, and idioms have their own rules.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ericatica

"Ain't"? That should not be used here. Absolutely should not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chunkylefunga

Love is blind sure. But the neighbours ain't. Who talks like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

Lil' Abner did, which is where this form of the idiom originated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arjuna725

I said " the love is blind but the neighbors aren't" and was incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2676

Because we don't say "the love" in English, just "love".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Priichuuu

I have never heard this saying... (I'm a native Spanish speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fayrub1

The usage of ain't. . . Seems wrong try saying Love is blind but neighbors aren't


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariana762054

Ain't is not word. Aren't would be put to better use here. That or saying the neighbors are not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Actually ain't is found in the dictionary but it is still considered non-standard. There's a whole discussion about it if you scroll up. You and a whole bunch of others object to the word. I suggest reporting it to Duolingo if it bothers you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calvinlimuel13

Yes... the neighbors are not blind


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beccaluv1

Ain't ... really?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolDavis2

Read: be warned about not messing around on your spouse. Love the humor of this one!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That's not what the expression means. It means that those in love do not see the other's faults clearly, if at all, but outsiders who are not so smitten can see them for who they are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolDavis2

Thanks for your most learned insight!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbwteyp3

It says I am wrong, just because I wrote "The love" instead of just "Love" even though there clearly is an "el" in front of love.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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You can't apply Spanish grammar rules to English. Spanish requires the definite article there. No English speaker says "the love". It's simply "love".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BasimAlmgo

The first part of the proverb is commonly used in Arabic but not the second part.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalakLotfi

I wrote "the love is..." but they told me it's wrong it's actually "love is..." but at the beginning there is "El" they ignored that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, they did not ignore it. Spanish is not English with different words. Different languages have different grammatical rules. In English, when we talk about concepts like love, we do not use "the". In Spanish, apparently, they do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AparnaSaha1

I dont understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Can you be more specific? That's not much to go on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AparnaSaha1

I am sorry what I meant to say was that the response that i gave to this was incorrect just because of the grammer for el when it didn't mean the.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

I'm not really sure what you mean... in this sentence "el" does mean "the." What's going on here is that Spanish requires the use of the article when referring to concepts whereas English does not. English speakers just say Love, Honor, or Loyalty. We capitalize them when we mean to speak of them as universal concepts. In Spanish, however, you must say "El amor, el honor, o la fidelidad."

There are many times when Spanish requires the use of the article whereas in English we drop it. Another example is in English when we're speaking in general we would say "I like coffee." We only say "the coffee" when we're talking about a specific type or cup of coffee: "I like the coffee at Starbucks." In Spanish you must always use the article "Me gusta el café."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Supergirl__2004

This doesnt make sence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

The Duolingo sentence is half a quote. The word for word translation does not make too much sense in English, but I guess the general meaning of this quote is "Love is Blind, but the neighbours ..." meaning that in a "house" with nextdoor neighbours - the neighbours see things going on that the "house" where a couple who are in the "house" do not see. For example: The husband of the house goes off to work, and the wife has a lover arrive during the day. Maybe: The wife goes off to work, and the husband has a lover on the side. The neighbours know that the "Love is Blind" is in full bloom and the cheating couple are still in love with each other, without knowing of their "fun and games" on the side. "Love is Blind" really should be the end of the quote for this Duolingo Course, (The neighours aren't) is really just an unnecessary qualification of "Love is Blind", for the Duolingo Course and just makes for a couple of page of discussion here. I think that this "saying" should have been left out of the Course or just "Love is Blind" left in the Duolingo Course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Love is blind (but the neighbors aren't)" means that when two people are in love, they can't see each other's faults clearly, if at all. But others have a more objective viewpoint.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Exactly! My only complaint with this whole section is that none of these are idioms. An idiom is something that you can't figure out based on an understanding of the words alone. For example: to be in hot water, or to be at sixes and sevens. A foreigner who speaks perfect English may have no idea what those phrases mean because they are true idiomatic expressions. Even native speakers may not know many of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiaKalmyko

I wrote correct, but program said that it mistake..hmmmm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sierra.Regina

what kind of a weird sentence is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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You signed up for expressions an idioms. It's an expression. It means that when you're in love, you don't always see your partner's faults clearly, but others don't have such clouded perceptions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narulakartik

why is 'el amor' not translated to 'the love'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Because that's not how we do it in English. When you speak in general you don't use an article in English like they do in Spanish. We only use the article when it's specific. General: I like coffee. Specific: I like the coffee at Starbucks. General: Love is blind. Specific: I need the love of a good woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R.Ocho8

I have no problem with this idiom. It speaks to PDA, if you know what I mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

It really isn't about PDA. It's about not seeing fault in people when we love them. We are more forgiving of things when we love someone than an objective outsider would be. Your husband or wife may be a bit of a "douche" as judged by the public, but because you're in love with him/her you can't see it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Some people are confusing this quote by Noël Clarasó with another American "saying" that is not equivalent. If you literally translate this you will get it right. Love is blind, but not the neighbors. If you go with the other misleading saying "Don't make love by the garden gate, love is blind but the neighbor's ain't" you will not get the same meaning. Why? Because they aren't equivalent. One is about public displays of affection and the other is about not seeing faults in your loved ones. It should be obvious that there's an ENTIRE CLAUSE MISSING (Don't make love by the garden gate) from one of these "sayings" which changes the meaning ENTIRELY!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConnorBanks

I said "The love is blind, but the neighbors are not." I GOT IT WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!! WTF


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Hey ConnorBanks, is English your native language? In English we don't say "the love," we just say "love." When you speak in general you don't use the article "the." We only say "the" when we talk about something specific. For example: I like coffee. You only say "the coffee" when you mean something specific like: "I like the coffee at Starbucks." You can say "the love," but only when it's specific: "I need the love of a good woman." But mostly we just drop the article: Love is blind. I hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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In English, concepts like "love" do not take any articles. It's jut "love", not "the love".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CFCHAZARD10

Who actually got this right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

I got this right, but didn't use the word "ain't". I wrote "Love is blind but not the neighbors." It will be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G_Chi

Isn't it "The love is blind..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Which love are you referring to? In English you only use "the" when what you're talking about has been specified. If it isn't specific, then you drop the article. Love (in general) is blind. The love you offer (specific) is not enough to sustain me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, English does not use articles when talking about general concepts like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You can use articles when referring to concepts: The love I lost, was a good one. What's going on here is the difference between specific and general. When it's general you don't use an article EVEN if it's not a concept but a concrete object: Coffee is delicious! But when it's specific you do use an article: The coffee at Starbucks is delicious!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That's what I meant when I said "general concepts like this", but I suppose I could have been more clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayEssAy

I wrote, "Love is blind, but neighbors aren't," and it said I "need the article 'the' here. I know that strictly speaking the word "los" is in there, but do I really NEED it? Does it change the meaning in any way without the "the?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Yes it does, actually. As colloquial as the expression is, saying "the neighbors" specifies particular neighbors who are affected by your indiscreet expression of affection. Just "neighbors" indicates neighbors in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FluffyDucky1

Why is the translate 'love is...' and not 'The love is...' ? Please help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Because native English speakers do not say "The love is..." It's simply "Love is..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FluffyDucky1

Ok! Thanks, that makes more sense now :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shamsoul

then why put 'el' in front of 'amor', I wonder?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Because Spanish has different rules than English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blackrock2

My Russian version - "Love is evil, you may fall in love even with a goat".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danny2103

This one is especially beautiful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottAHibbs

I also put THE love because of the El... I think it should be correct because its literal of the Spanish (agree not spoken in English)

Are they judging my natively poor English or my newly developed poor Spanish here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Translation is never about making a word-for-word cipher. You got marked wrong because "The love is blind..." is not included in the database of accepted translations. And it's not included because that is not natural English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamaud

Because it's an idiom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmberJohns50964

ain't isnt an english word and I got marked down for forgetting an apostrophe, what is going on here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/passionfruit12

Lost in translation... I presume this means neighbors peeping through your window when you get it on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Not at all. It's metaphorical blindness. When you are in love, you can't always see the other person's faults. But outsiders can see their character clearly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosAndr603005

The love is blind, but not the neighbors And say me bad response, I don't understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Because native English speakers do not say "The love is..." It's simply "Love is..." Concepts and ideas don't usually take an article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeIvory

So I got this one wrong just because I put a 'the' at the front! The idiom started with 'El' so why the hell is this wrong?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ha007

EL is there in sentence but THE is not in translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That's right. English and Spanish have different grammar rules. One is not a simple calque of the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

Huh! Interesting, never "heard of this one" but the translation is of course "lumpy" to me! "Ain't" is slang!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You've never heard of this one because it really isn't a proverb, adage or idiom; it's a quote from Noel Clarasó and, because of that, technically doesn't belong here. The first part--love is blind--is the adage you will recognize.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

So this phrase in Duolingo was half a quote, no wonder I found the second part of this "quote" to be rather odd and and the translation seemed to be "lumpy" or "half baked" to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Slang and other non-standard words and constructions have their place. This is "idioms" after all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

The translation of this saying is a word for word translation, and I find in many other places that the translation is more thought for thought (in context). The slang does not bother me, nor the word for word translation, but other parts of the same lesson are entirely, "thought for thought"! This "saying" has been left, (to me, "half baked"). BTW I would like to see a word for word translation, followed by a "correct" English translation, but this would not fit in the context of Duolingo courses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bcucinotta

No, no, no! "Ain't" is not a formal contraction! It is slang.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Do you really expect idioms to conform to the formal register or standard dialect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenLuss1

Ain't? That's not proper English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

If the word ain't offends you, Duolingo does accept: Love is blind but not the neighbors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Do you honestly expect idioms, expressions, and figures of speech to conform to formal standard English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leehman

Who says this? And why do I NEED the article. My translation was "Love is blind, but neighbors aren't." THAT was unacceptable, but "neighbors aint" is? Again, who says this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mjahdah

Probably because you used 'but neighbors aren't', which is general instead of 'but the neighbors aren't' which would focus on the neighbors more directly involved in the action.

I hope I helped a bit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Your answer is acceptable and you should have reported it to Duolingo. We often drop articles in English.

I think the particular person who created some of these translations may not have been aware of the deep-seated prejudice some English-speakers have to the word "ain't." The word has been vilified by English teachers for years seemingly for no other reason than it's preferred usage in areas of the Appalachians and deep south. The word has been used in great literature but nowadays it is considered "nonstandard" and connotes unsophistication in the speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I agree with most of what you said, but there is a big difference between "neighbors" and "the neighbors" here.

"...but the neighbors ain't" means the specific people in question.
"...but neighbors ain't" means people in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

So the better translation of Señor Clarasó's quote would be without the article, since how are we to know the people in question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, it's with the article. It's not just any neighbors who aren't blind, it's the neighbors you're in the vicinity of.

There are two versions of this saying, each with its own interpretation.

"Love is blind, but the neighbors ain't." When you're in love, you're metaphorically blind to your partner's faults, but other people can see what's going on more objectively and more clearly.

"Don't make love by the garden gate. Love may be blind, but the neighbors ain't." This is a little more literal and means that others don't like to witness such public displays of affection. (The phrase "to make love" is at least 100 years old and originally meant "to woo or to flirt".)

Either way, the expression is "the neighbors".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

The expression is supposed to be Spanish. We don't have the equivalent expression in English and I've even found it translated in English as "Love is blind, but not the neighbors." The point is, since the expression is presented as Spanish in origin, then any equivalent translation in English should suffice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

'AIN'T' is slang and should not be taught in language lessons, learning slang is only good after one has a good knowledge of the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pavel873905

Why not the right answer is "The love is blind but not the neighbors" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/picklsmasterson

the love is blind, but the neighbors arent. wrong apparently


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That's not natural English. "Love is blind" sounds a lot better than "The love is blind".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vishalgautamm

My translation was "The love is blind, but the neighbors isn't". can someone please point out whats wrong with the translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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In English, if we're speaking of a generality or a concept, we don't normally use the definite article. So we would say "Love is blind," not "The love is blind."

"Neighbors" is plural, and you used the singular "is". It should be "the neighbors aren't" or for the colloquial idiom, "the neighbors ain't".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vishalgautamm

Thanks a lot Rae for the clarification :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mjahdah

Is should be used after a singular noun or pronoun. Example: "He is ...", or "She is ...". 'Los vecinos' is plural so the translation should read, as "They are ...," referencing more than one neighbor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdl0

it means if love someone, you don't care about their imperfections. neighbors might get bothered.


[deactivated user]

    ..but the neighbor's AIN'T?? What kind of disgustingly weak English is that?? People are here to learn proper language use! Not dysfunctional junk!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    This is the idioms section. Idioms are not required to conform to the academic/professional dialect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwchandler

    Is this what you say to someone for excessive PDA? Would "get a room" be another acceptable answer?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    This has nothing to do with exhibitionism. It means that when you are in love, you have trouble clearly seeing the other person's faults. But outsiders don't have their perceptions and judgement clouded.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

    Umm no. This idiom refers to how we tend not to see the faults of our lovers, when everyone else does.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/queendopamine

    Seriously??? I didnt put the article in and it docks me for not putting THE neighbors. But everything else is right. Screw you DL


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mjahdah

    'The neighbors' is necessary in this phrase because 'neighbors' is directly involved with the lack of the other participant(s).

    I hope this helped.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xoahmylaxo123

    Ain't isn't even a word Duolingo!!! You're punishing me for being grammatically correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

    Whoever created this "idiom" assumes that we have a corresponding one in English and that this is the correct translation. Personally, I've never heard it (Love is blind, yes, but this, no) and from the majority of responses, neither have many others. My cursory research attributes this (in Spanish) as a quote from Noel Clarasó... so it's a quote, not an idiom. If that's the case, any answer you give that's close should be accepted. I hope you reported it to Duolingo as that's the only way it will get fixed.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarianJack

    As a solution, you do not want to introduce the word "ain't" to those learning English! "Love is blind, but not neighborly" is a far better and proper solution. FYI.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    "Love is blind but not neighborly" does not mean the same thing at all as "Love is blind, but the neighbors ain't."

    The expression we're learning is "Love is blind, but the neighbors ain't (blind)." Meaning that when you're in love, you don't notice the other person's faults, but that doesn't stop others from noticing those faults.

    "To be neighborly" means "to be a good neighbor". "Love is blind but not neighborly" says that love is not a good neighbor, and that doesn't make any sense at all.

    Idioms have fairly fixed forms. "Love is blind, but the neighbors ain't" is the most common way to say this. If you're concerned with applying academic English rules to idioms, then you'd be better off suggesting "Love is blind, but the neighbors are not."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarianJack

    Yes, good English is practiced as is correct Spanish. I like your ending suggestion. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlotteN7

    Hmm. No it isn't. It doesn't mean the same at all

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