"El amor es ciego, pero los vecinos no."

Translation:Love is blind, but the neighbors ain't.

December 21, 2013

175 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjordzhenvogh

This is definitely an idiom I've never encountered. At least, not the second half.

December 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

I have seen Spanish language cartoons using this idiom -- a couple having sex at the living room window. ;)

December 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/11AndrewSmith11

I think it refers to the fact that when someone's "In love", they can be blind to a logical perspective seen from the outside (neighbors). Especially those negative relationships we try and warn our friends and family about :p haha

PS: Spanish cartoons sound way better than American cartoons!

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackhammond

You should get Mod, I see you in every comment section.

August 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kburns421

I've never heard the second half either. Maybe it's something commonly used in Spanish but not English.

January 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob906633

This is a common saying for older english speaking people. Meaning the person in love can't see the problems in their relationship that everyone around them can.

October 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DORAGARCIA204924

Hola. Esta frase en Mexico significa que las personas que te rodean estan al pendiente de tus acciones. Y si haces algo mal, siempre habra alguien que te vio hacerlo.

November 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evalina98000

muchas gracias

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loofoo

As a native Spanish speaker, I've never heard this before. These idioms are very random... with so many different countries speaking different variations of Spanish this must be fairly common.

January 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

It would be really helpful if the idioms were accompanied by some info. on where they are common, since, as you note, there are so many varieties of Spanish.

February 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megustamivida

and so many variations of english! Talk about a recipe for confusion.

May 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeIvory

I don't think English varies anywhere near as much as Spanish.

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlaquest

Agreed! That's something I wish Duolingo would do for all the Spanish lessons, not just the idioms.

September 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjduncan2

CONGRATS ON YOUR YEAR LONG STREAK!

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Thanks for noticing! :

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PepperMint401545

Whoa! Do you really speak all those languages! I'm super impressed! Which is you first language? And you're right. You know how they have an "Explain" button for words? What about idioms, right?

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

No, I just study them. :) Thanks.

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Also, I saw your lingot-begging post. Gave you a few too. :)

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Unless you are familiar with Noel Clarasó you will not have heard the second half of this. It's a quote from him and not really an adage at all.

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamaud

Well known in the UK

November 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

And in my part of the US as well.

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TripCode

Given the apparent proliferation of idioms that the UK and the Southern part of the US seem to share, I am not surprised that this is something I as a Southerner recognize that is also heard across the pond.

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

That's because it's a quote, not a proverb like most of these and definitely not an idiom. It's attributed to Noel Clarasó.

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

Very common where I'm from. As a matter of fact some wag wrote it in my High School yearbook as a poem. "Don't make love near the garden gate, for love is blind but the neighbors ain't"

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

This is a quote, not an idiom. Noel Clarasó is the author. Actually lots of these are not idioms but proverbs or adages. El amor es ciego is the actual axiom.

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dar320

Mismo, aqui. It just means pull down the shades. Its cute and memorable

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

It is disturbing to see a translation using the nonstandard English word "ain't." All schools in the U. S. teach that this word is nonstandard, is often used by illiterate people, and is not to be used in scholastic and business writing. In my opinion and the opinion of all the English teachers I ever knew, it makes a bad impression.

January 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krashman

I wouldn't use it in normal conversation, but I would absolutely use it in idioms. E.g. "Ain't that a ❤❤❤❤❤," "there ain't no rest for the wicked," or "ain't nobody got time for that."

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GRoppolo1

I'm sorry... ain't nobody got time for that is an idiom now?

November 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrienneOrlando

Yes. Attributed to Ms. Sweet Brown, witness to (and victim of) an apartment fire that was broadcast on the news. She said, "I got bronchitis! Ain't nobody got time for that!"

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momo4488

That's a meme, not an idiom

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You're right, none of those are idioms. An idiom is something you won't necessarily understand even if you know all the words. "To pass the buck," "To be hoisted on one's own petard," "To be at sixes and sevens," "To be thin skinned," "To be on cloud 9," are all true idioms. I wish this section had focused on that and not on maxims or sayings.

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnjeTheNerd

It would work fine in idioms, but this isn't an idiom in English, as far as I've heard in my 30-odd years of speaking it natively.

March 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

You're not old enough. I heard it all the time as a kid. It has gone out of style, but it was a very popular idiom at one time, and still is in some regions. It was actually popularized by the Lil Abner Comic strip, although it didn't originate there.

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drumknott

"Don't make love by the garden gate - love may be blind, but the neighbors ain't."

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valgal707

Is it perhaps that the "pero los vecinos no" part is a comparably sub-standard way of speaking? Can Spanish speakers perhaps tell us?

January 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AurosHarman

I think that's exactly it. If it were "proper", it would be "pero los vecinos no son" or "pero no son los vecinos". The omission of the actual verb in the latter clause makes it more like English "ain't" -- obviously comprehensible, but very casual.

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuirkyRabbit

I remember seeing "pero yo no" after a comma in another exercise. I suppose there is a verb in the second half but it's implied, in this case "ser" which appears as "es" in the first half. I'm not a native speaker so I can't say if this is proper/regional usage or not.

March 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaolan77

It's probably not great Spanish but it's certainly used. My friends use 'pero yo no' all the time. I get the impression it's used when you're being flippant but then again Latinos are very frank and don't beat around the bush when they're talking either.

March 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-_Matthew-_

Nobody has time for that.

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEliseF

Fully agree. I am an English teacher. "Ain't" is slang (in itself a slang word ;)), however as the saying was originally coined among the poorer peoples (richer people have more input from parents and other family members) ain't is the only way I have ever heard this phrase

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FigTwig

Well it also accepts "Love is blind, but the neighbors aren't" if that makes anyone feel better.

January 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PniB

ha ha :) I find it so frustrating when I am trying to find information about Spanish, of course related to current sentence, phrase, etc. and all I find is comment after comment discussing the english. Although there is a chance that I have contributed to such a conversation myself ;)

January 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megustamivida

excellent point, and I am definitely guilty. It's just because I love language that I find this fascinating.

May 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlaquest

It accepted "Love is blind, but not the neighbors" for me.

September 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHazard

I'd be careful when categorically stating a word is only "used by illiterate people" etc. and "leave a very, very bad impression." It is quite acceptable in some spoken dialects. In the 18th century it was acceptable in educated circles.

Today, of course, it cannot be used in academic or journalistic writing, but that does not demote the word to "illiterate people who know no better." I speak as a wordsmith, and I ain't about to drop the word from my lexicon.

References: Read "The Story of Ain't" or see the controversy surrounding Webster's Third, published in 1961. The dictionary tried to bring back "ain't" into educated circles, and said it was "used orally in most parts of the U.S. by cultivated speakers. No, no se dice que otros.

Good on Duolingo for offering the word as a translation choice! Aprendemos de estos modismos peculiares.

February 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katemonster

Notice that Duolingo doesn't use "ain't" in any of its other translations. This lesson is about idioms and colloquial phrases, not about scholastic and business writing. Plus, it's completely optional. If you are that disturbed by colloquial speech, I urge you to just move on to another lesson.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Idioms and colloquial language often use nonstandard grammar. Ain't no lie.

February 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mom2aaroncarter

this is a super racist and classist response. many dialects use ain't, and the topic here is idioms!!

April 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nasair

It is in the dictionary.

May 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/germano_germino

Idioms are "folk-proverbs" which usually convey wisdom by the means of memory hooks - one of them being rhymes. Correct grammar or spelling is usually not only not relevant for them but sometimes little errors can serve as mnemonics themselves. So my simple explanation is that "blind" and "ain't" rhyme.

August 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meierlw

It's slang, I agree that it is improper but it still used in certain conversational language in the US in the south. For example, sometimes I say "It ain't gonna fix itself" this is incorrect but it's fun local thing to say. :-)

October 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jalepenito

I love the word ain't and can't wait to use it again now that I see duo accepts it. I hope y'all will do the same. Languages are living things. The fun stops when we forget that. I like to say Howdy instead of Hi. I tend to swallow Hi and people can't hear me. Plus I figure it weeds out the snobs. When it comes to languages my hero is any 6 year-old. Except in English, they speak better than I do even with any and all mistakes. When I was living and studying in France I heard "C'est pas..." on the street. When I asked my French teacher about it, she wouldn't acknowledge what it meant. She would only say, "No, it's 'Ce n'est pas..." FYI C'est and Ce sound the same. She did it three times and I just walked away. If we were in the US then fine, but she did nothing to help me communicate with people. Another example is "Tu as vu?" which gets compressed to "T'as vu?" Gotta say, I love this saying. This new (to me) or full version has alot ( :-) ) of wisdom in it.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luv_star99

I put "the love is blind" , you know, because they put "el amor" and that was my last strike... :(

August 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PniB

Can anyone out there who is a spanish speaker please explain to me what this idiom is usually meant to express? Thanks

January 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

I thought it might be the same as "Love is blind" with the added tag meaning "but those who aren't in love can see the loved one's qualities more clearly.

February 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judohelen

I think: Don't do PDA's--public displays of affection. Right? Would you say it to a couple making out in the hallway?--or about them?

January 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FLchick

I'd rather say, "Ain't love grand".

March 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlotteN7

This was so good, made me laugh out loud even though I am in a restaurant

September 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fdean1

Lol, I laughed so much at this XD

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/witchietaitai

I just heard this idiom used in an episode of Criminal Minds. The profilers were in Mexico looking for a serial killer. It was translated on the show as "Love is blind but the neighbors are not"

September 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KHollywood1

I never heard it before either but it makes perfect sense depending on your wisdom I guess! What it means is ...Say for instance someone is getting beat by her husband but she stays and if you ask why of course she will no doubt say CAUSE I LOVE HIM! ((SHE IS BLINDED BY LOVE)) so much so she stays!! HOWEVER the neighbors see and hear everything very clear and they don't love him so they are not blinded and see him for the ass that he is. (It's a metaphor / analogy) OKAY HAVE YOU EVER HAD A GIRLFRIEND THAT WAS A PSYCHO AND YOUR FRIENDS TRIED TO TELL YOU BUT ... NOOOOO BECAUSE YOU LOVED HER SO YOU STAYED ....Then one day it hit you F this broad cause you either opened your eyes or she dumped you and you were forced to get over it basically ... Now you might laugh at it now like OMG I can't believe I tripped over that whore monger ... GET IT? YOU ARE IN THE PICTURE! SO YOU CAN'T STEP BACK AND SEE IT FOR EVERYTHING IN IT BUT OTHERS CAN CAUSE IT'S IN FRONT OF THEM ... KEYWORDS : METAPHOR / ANALOGY

January 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim4Portuguese

"Love is blind" is very common in England but the bit about the neighbours sound like something muy de pueblo in Spain.

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEliseF

Definitely used in English. My parents (both from Kent) used it regularly. I think it is just a case that in more recent years it has become shortened, initially because people assumed that the rest of the idiom was known and then, as is being shown here, because it was not.

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ_Mc

What in this sentence comprises the word "ain't"? That is, what would be the incorrect Spanish just as "ain't" is incorrect English? It simply looks to me (as a beginner) that "Love is blind but the neighbors are not."

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

"Ain't" is not incorrect, it is merely non-standard and informal.

That said, the entire thing is just a figure of speech. Don't expect a full word-for-word translation where one isolated bit in one language exactly corresponds to an isolated bit in the other language.

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ_Mc

First of all, I can't figure out what kind of order these comments follow. I would have thought my comment and your reply would have been at the bottom of the list.

But to my question, I guess what I'm asking is that when this is said in Spanish, is there something very informal about it as there would be if we said "Ain't love wonderful?" I was trying to get to what makes this sentence so informal that the translation would include "ain't"?

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Comments are ordered by how upvoted they are.

When it comes to things like this, it's more a matter of that's just what the equivalent expression is. Register of speech is secondary here. It's not like "Hello, how are you?" vs "Yo, 'sup?"

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ_Mc

Not to be difficult, but I think it would be important to know if I were saying the equivalent of "Yo, 'sup?" as opposed to "Hello, how are you?" Can I assume DuoLingo is not going to teach me something that would be inappropriate in certain company?

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuperStinkyButt

why is it neighbors aint not are not

July 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Because it's an idiom, and idioms have their own rules.

July 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ericatica

"Ain't"? That should not be used here. Absolutely should not.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1092031855

Never heard of it before in any language

September 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrapHagga

Ain't ain't a word so I ain't gonna say it!!!!

November 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nvdoren

Here's the whole thing:"Never kiss by the garden gate./ Love may be blind but the neighbors ain't." So, my mother informed me.

November 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chunkylefunga

Love is blind sure. But the neighbours ain't. Who talks like that?

November 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

Lil' Abner did, which is where this form of the idiom originated.

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BasimAlmgo

The first part of the proverb is commonly used in Arabic but not the second part.

January 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleEv9

I thought these would be actual Spanish Idioms.. these are all American/ English ones translated into Spanish...

April 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

I'm with you. Most of these aren't even idioms but rather proverbs or adages. An idiom is something like "to kick the bucket" or "to raise Caine" or " to raise a red flag" or " to hoist by one's own petard". It's an expression where you can't necessarily know or even guess the meaning from the words alone.

I learned several good ones in Dutch. "Hij ligt op apegapen" literally to lie gasping like an ape meaning dead tired or at your last gasp. Or "de pijp uit gaan" litterally to go out of the pipe... meaning to die.

April 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bcucinotta

No, no, no! "Ain't" is not a formal contraction! It is slang.

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Do you really expect idioms to conform to the formal register or standard dialect?

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fayrub1

The usage of ain't. . . Seems wrong try saying Love is blind but neighbors aren't

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConnorBanks

I said "The love is blind, but the neighbors are not." I GOT IT WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!! WTF

August 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Hey ConnorBanks, is English your native language? In English we don't say "the love," we just say "love." When you speak in general you don't use the article "the." We only say "the" when we talk about something specific. For example: I like coffee. You only say "the coffee" when you mean something specific like: "I like the coffee at Starbucks." You can say "the love," but only when it's specific: "I need the love of a good woman." But mostly we just drop the article: Love is blind. I hope this helps.

August 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

In English, concepts like "love" do not take any articles. It's jut "love", not "the love".

August 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CFCHAZARD10

Who actually got this right?

August 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

I got this right, but didn't use the word "ain't". I wrote "Love is blind but not the neighbors." It will be accepted.

August 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayEssAy

I wrote, "Love is blind, but neighbors aren't," and it said I "need the article 'the' here. I know that strictly speaking the word "los" is in there, but do I really NEED it? Does it change the meaning in any way without the "the?"

May 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Yes it does, actually. As colloquial as the expression is, saying "the neighbors" specifies particular neighbors who are affected by your indiscreet expression of affection. Just "neighbors" indicates neighbors in general.

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calvinlimuel13

Yes... the neighbors are not blind

June 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luv_star99

I put "the love is blind" , you know, because they put "el amor" and that was my last strike... :(

August 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antiderivative

This is the one that killed my lesson, but at least it is funny. I've never heard of it in English.

November 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/picklsmasterson

the love is blind, but the neighbors arent. wrong apparently

April 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

That's not natural English. "Love is blind" sounds a lot better than "The love is blind".

April 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FluffyDucky1

Why is the translate 'love is...' and not 'The love is...' ? Please help!

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Because native English speakers do not say "The love is..." It's simply "Love is..."

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FluffyDucky1

Ok! Thanks, that makes more sense now :)

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shamsoul

then why put 'el' in front of 'amor', I wonder?

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Because Spanish has different rules than English.

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blackrock2

My Russian version - "Love is evil, you may fall in love even with a goat".

June 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danny2103

This one is especially beautiful.

July 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vishalgautamm

My translation was "The love is blind, but the neighbors isn't". can someone please point out whats wrong with the translation

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

In English, if we're speaking of a generality or a concept, we don't normally use the definite article. So we would say "Love is blind," not "The love is blind."

"Neighbors" is plural, and you used the singular "is". It should be "the neighbors aren't" or for the colloquial idiom, "the neighbors ain't".

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vishalgautamm

Thanks a lot Rae for the clarification :)

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mjahdah

Is should be used after a singular noun or pronoun. Example: "He is ...", or "She is ...". 'Los vecinos' is plural so the translation should read, as "They are ...," referencing more than one neighbor.

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pavel873905

Why not the right answer is "The love is blind but not the neighbors" ?

September 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seva13

Love it,,,, love it.... love it ....

September 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyzono

El means the right, well i even hovered over it and it said the

October 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Yes, but different languages have different grammar rules. In Spanish you need to say "El amor", but in English "the love" does not sound natural.

October 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottAHibbs

I also put THE love because of the El... I think it should be correct because its literal of the Spanish (agree not spoken in English)

Are they judging my natively poor English or my newly developed poor Spanish here?

October 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Translation is never about making a word-for-word cipher. You got marked wrong because "The love is blind..." is not included in the database of accepted translations. And it's not included because that is not natural English.

October 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beccaluv1

Ain't ... really?

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmberJohns50964

ain't isnt an english word and I got marked down for forgetting an apostrophe, what is going on here

November 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/passionfruit12

Lost in translation... I presume this means neighbors peeping through your window when you get it on.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Not at all. It's metaphorical blindness. When you are in love, you can't always see the other person's faults. But outsiders can see their character clearly.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosAndr603005

The love is blind, but not the neighbors And say me bad response, I don't understand

November 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Because native English speakers do not say "The love is..." It's simply "Love is..." Concepts and ideas don't usually take an article.

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwchandler

Is this what you say to someone for excessive PDA? Would "get a room" be another acceptable answer?

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

This has nothing to do with exhibitionism. It means that when you are in love, you have trouble clearly seeing the other person's faults. But outsiders don't have their perceptions and judgement clouded.

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwchandler

OK, thanks

December 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

Umm no. This idiom refers to how we tend not to see the faults of our lovers, when everyone else does.

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolDavis2

Read: be warned about not messing around on your spouse. Love the humor of this one!

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

That's not what the expression means. It means that those in love do not see the other's faults clearly, if at all, but outsiders who are not so smitten can see them for who they are.

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolDavis2

Thanks for your most learned insight!

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arjuna725

I said " the love is blind but the neighbors aren't" and was incorrect

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Because we don't say "the love" in English, just "love".

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Priichuuu

I have never heard this saying... (I'm a native Spanish speaker)

December 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbwteyp3

It says I am wrong, just because I wrote "The love" instead of just "Love" even though there clearly is an "el" in front of love.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

You can't apply Spanish grammar rules to English. Spanish requires the definite article there. No English speaker says "the love". It's simply "love".

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeIvory

So I got this one wrong just because I put a 'the' at the front! The idiom started with 'El' so why the hell is this wrong?!

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ha007

EL is there in sentence but THE is not in translation.

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

That's right. English and Spanish have different grammar rules. One is not a simple calque of the other.

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolDavis2

For goodness sake people, move on!

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalakLotfi

I wrote "the love is..." but they told me it's wrong it's actually "love is..." but at the beginning there is "El" they ignored that.

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

No, they did not ignore it. Spanish is not English with different words. Different languages have different grammatical rules. In English, when we talk about concepts like love, we do not use "the". In Spanish, apparently, they do.

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

Huh! Interesting, never "heard of this one" but the translation is of course "lumpy" to me! "Ain't" is slang!

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You've never heard of this one because it really isn't a proverb, adage or idiom; it's a quote from Noel Clarasó and, because of that, technically doesn't belong here. The first part--love is blind--is the adage you will recognize.

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

So this phrase in Duolingo was half a quote, no wonder I found the second part of this "quote" to be rather odd and and the translation seemed to be "lumpy" or "half baked" to me!

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Slang and other non-standard words and constructions have their place. This is "idioms" after all.

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

The translation of this saying is a word for word translation, and I find in many other places that the translation is more thought for thought (in context). The slang does not bother me, nor the word for word translation, but other parts of the same lesson are entirely, "thought for thought"! This "saying" has been left, (to me, "half baked"). BTW I would like to see a word for word translation, followed by a "correct" English translation, but this would not fit in the context of Duolingo courses.

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AparnaSaha1

I dont understand

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

Can you be more specific? That's not much to go on.

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AparnaSaha1

I am sorry what I meant to say was that the response that i gave to this was incorrect just because of the grammer for el when it didn't mean the.

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

I'm not really sure what you mean... in this sentence "el" does mean "the." What's going on here is that Spanish requires the use of the article when referring to concepts whereas English does not. English speakers just say Love, Honor, or Loyalty. We capitalize them when we mean to speak of them as universal concepts. In Spanish, however, you must say "El amor, el honor, o la fidelidad."

There are many times when Spanish requires the use of the article whereas in English we drop it. Another example is in English when we're speaking in general we would say "I like coffee." We only say "the coffee" when we're talking about a specific type or cup of coffee: "I like the coffee at Starbucks." In Spanish you must always use the article "Me gusta el café."

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdl0

it means if love someone, you don't care about their imperfections. neighbors might get bothered.

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Supergirl__2004

This doesnt make sence

May 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

The Duolingo sentence is half a quote. The word for word translation does not make too much sense in English, but I guess the general meaning of this quote is "Love is Blind, but the neighbours ..." meaning that in a "house" with nextdoor neighbours - the neighbours see things going on that the "house" where a couple who are in the "house" do not see. For example: The husband of the house goes off to work, and the wife has a lover arrive during the day. Maybe: The wife goes off to work, and the husband has a lover on the side. The neighbours know that the "Love is Blind" is in full bloom and the cheating couple are still in love with each other, without knowing of their "fun and games" on the side. "Love is Blind" really should be the end of the quote for this Duolingo Course, (The neighours aren't) is really just an unnecessary qualification of "Love is Blind", for the Duolingo Course and just makes for a couple of page of discussion here. I think that this "saying" should have been left out of the Course or just "Love is Blind" left in the Duolingo Course.

May 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

"Love is blind (but the neighbors aren't)" means that when two people are in love, they can't see each other's faults clearly, if at all. But others have a more objective viewpoint.

May 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Exactly! My only complaint with this whole section is that none of these are idioms. An idiom is something that you can't figure out based on an understanding of the words alone. For example: to be in hot water, or to be at sixes and sevens. A foreigner who speaks perfect English may have no idea what those phrases mean because they are true idiomatic expressions. Even native speakers may not know many of them.

May 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiaKalmyko

I wrote correct, but program said that it mistake..hmmmm

June 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sierra.Regina

what kind of a weird sentence is this?

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

You signed up for expressions an idioms. It's an expression. It means that when you're in love, you don't always see your partner's faults clearly, but others don't have such clouded perceptions.

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jay444411

Hilarious

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jay444411
July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtayUstunkarli

Like wtf, I have a spanish girlfriend from Almeria, she says that this sentence is wrong. The thing is she is so beautiful that she can't go wrong with this kind of ❤❤❤❤. Please check this sentence again for Gods sake. She is so ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ cute like her voice is uhhhhhhhhh and her laugh omg... Anyway she is the nicest person I met but she cheats on me with """"""Samuel"""""". But I still love her idk. Am I stupid or? Please leave a comment guys.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariana762054

Ain't is not word. Aren't would be put to better use here. That or saying the neighbors are not

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Actually ain't is found in the dictionary but it is still considered non-standard. There's a whole discussion about it if you scroll up. You and a whole bunch of others object to the word. I suggest reporting it to Duolingo if it bothers you.

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narulakartik

why is 'el amor' not translated to 'the love'?

July 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Because that's not how we do it in English. When you speak in general you don't use an article in English like they do in Spanish. We only use the article when it's specific. General: I like coffee. Specific: I like the coffee at Starbucks. General: Love is blind. Specific: I need the love of a good woman.

July 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R.Ocho8

I have no problem with this idiom. It speaks to PDA, if you know what I mean.

August 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

It really isn't about PDA. It's about not seeing fault in people when we love them. We are more forgiving of things when we love someone than an objective outsider would be. Your husband or wife may be a bit of a "douche" as judged by the public, but because you're in love with him/her you can't see it.

August 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Some people are confusing this quote by Noël Clarasó with another American "saying" that is not equivalent. If you literally translate this you will get it right. Love is blind, but not the neighbors. If you go with the other misleading saying "Don't make love by the garden gate, love is blind but the neighbor's ain't" you will not get the same meaning. Why? Because they aren't equivalent. One is about public displays of affection and the other is about not seeing faults in your loved ones. It should be obvious that there's an ENTIRE CLAUSE MISSING (Don't make love by the garden gate) from one of these "sayings" which changes the meaning ENTIRELY!

August 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Summertime1001

it doesnt except "but the neighbours ARE NOT, it has to be AINT

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You need to report it to Duolingo. They will change it if enough people report the problem.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G-Chi

Isn't it "The love is blind..."?

August 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

Which love are you referring to? In English you only use "the" when what you're talking about has been specified. If it isn't specific, then you drop the article. Love (in general) is blind. The love you offer (specific) is not enough to sustain me.

August 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

No, English does not use articles when talking about general concepts like this.

August 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

You can use articles when referring to concepts: The love I lost, was a good one. What's going on here is the difference between specific and general. When it's general you don't use an article EVEN if it's not a concept but a concrete object: Coffee is delicious! But when it's specific you do use an article: The coffee at Starbucks is delicious!

August 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2005

That's what I meant when I said "general concepts like this", but I suppose I could have been more clear.

August 16, 2016
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