"Dych chi eisiau blows las?"

Translation:Do you want a blue blouse?

January 30, 2016

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flinnian

The hint confusingly gives both blue and green (nature) can anyone explain this?

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bluthund

Maybe it's like in some Asian languages where they use the some word for blue and green and if you want to make clear what colour you are talking about you have to specify "las like the sky" or "las like grass".

January 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perepin

It looks like it comes from part of the history of Welsh: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue%E2%80%93green_distinction_in_language#Celtic

November 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

So are there more than one word for blue? Which is used where?

February 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielfigfoz

Y Gath Ddu,

I believe the distinction between blue and green in Welsh is fuzzy and not in the same place as in English. I think that 'glas' can be both green and blue and that traditionally they were considered to be different shades of the same colour in Welsh. Probably why grass starts with 'glas'.

I'm only going through the tests right now, and I did put 'glas' in for green which got marked wrong. I believe it may be rare nowadays, but I was nevertheless taught it in an evening class along with 'gwyrdd'.

Hwyl

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arthfoel

Many place names in Wales contain the historic glas for green, when there wasn't the distinction between the colours - Brynglas meaning green hill and not blue hill etc.

February 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flinnian

Interesting these little peculiarities between languages

February 2, 2016
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