"Теперь она живёт далеко от нас."

Translation:She is now living far from us.

3 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JohnNatter1

I think 'a long way from us should be acceptable here

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverMundy

So do I, six months later.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tayo63854

I agree. Native English speakers understand that both sentences mean the same thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginorodrigues
  • "Nowadays she lives far from us” was wrong;
  • "Now she lives far from us” was the correction.

Can somebody please help me see the difference?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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I'm sure most people don't see "теперь" and think "nowadays" (just meaning it hasn't been reported much, if ever), but I think it's probably ok. "Nowadays" tends to sound a bit folksy (albeit certainly only a standard speech register grade of folksy), an effect I would say would be even more amplified in this sentence. I think it'd be more common referring to less black-and-white situations: "Nowadays she doesn't come around as often as she used to."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zombie499410
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when to use из and when от?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royal_Gopnik

Difference between "теперь" and "сейчас"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
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Теперь is more of a contrast - she used to live near us but now she lives far away, while сейчас is more like "right now" in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mawz
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I wrote She is living far from us now, and it was wrong. Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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I don't know why that wouldn't be accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jtaylor162
Plus
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It also rejects "She now is living far from us." Too picky on the English syntax??

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scial
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Doesn't теперь sound weird? It sounds like чеперь.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
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Duolingo use of "far" often seems to be wrong. You often can't translate "daleko", ""weit", "loin" etc by "far" in the positive sense. the solution given here is wrong -- it should be "She is now living a long way (away) from us", although the negative "She is now living not far from us" is fine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikanokoi
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What is wrong with it? (Was I using "far" wrong all my life?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
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"She is now living far from us" whilst grammatically correct is something which a native speaker would never say. "She's living (quite) a long way away from us now" is best. A native British speaker would put "quite" in, to emphasise the distance. "Now she's living (quite) a long way away from us" or "She's now living(quite) a long way away from us" if you want to emphasise the point that it's "now", whereas before she was living nearby, or "with us" But what is weird is that with the negative sentnce "far" is fine: "She's living not far from us now" or "She doesn't live far from us now" are both natural English sentences Also, correct is "Have I been using "far" wrongly all my life?", not "Was I using "far" wrong all my life?" You deffo need to correct the English "solution" (deffo is colloquial for "definitely"!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/justinbrisk
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As a native English speaker I would say your opinion reflects how many natives would express themselves. However, I would disagree that the solution is not natural - a significant minority would express themselves the DL way. Perhaps we could all agree that the choice of example for this DL course could be improved because it introduces subtleties that even natives can debate - and goes beyond the scope of this course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikanokoi
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So you're saying "far" can only be used in negative sentences? You should report the sentence so that it could be corrected. I'm not a moderator :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
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More or less Compare "It's not far" with "It's a long way" or "We don't have far to go" with "We (still) have a long way to go (still)" or "She doesn't live far from here" with "She lives a long way away from here" I have repeatedly reported this issue but I think that it's a complex one to deal with

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grammarpenguin
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Look, I know them hicks o'er yonder in America don't be speakin' English quite right, but as far as my dialect is concerned (California Bay Area), you are definitely mistaken in extrapolating your own experience into a general rule for all English-speakers. Something like "It's a long drive - LA is far away" would be completely commonplace and would certainly not require "a long way[s] away", which would actually sound less natural to my ear.

Similarly, the sentence in question sounds perfectly natural to me if translated "She lives far away from us now". We usually require the "away" or an equivalent like "from here", but we don't say "a long way" in complementary distribution with "far" as you suggest.

Your translation is correct, of course, but the suggested one isn't wrong, so if they're accepting your version, there's no reason to repeatedly report anything.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
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с удоволствием меня интересуются очень языки и мне помог много диолинго затем я очень рад стараься пояснать точки английского

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
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You can also use "far" in questions Eg "Is it far?" "Yes it's a long way" or "No, it's not far" but not "Yes, it is far" which is wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cptchuckle

"Yes, it is far" is a perfectly acceptable sentence; I have no idea where you learned otherwise.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikanokoi
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Thank you, it's very interesting!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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NGrams seems to provide strong evidence against this position. "Far from us," has three times the frequency of "not far from us," seeming to imply that there are a very good fraction of "positive" uses, perhaps on the order of two-thirds.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
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I don't know what Ngrams is/are, but I would strongly stand by my position that in natural English (except in fixed espressions such "It's a far cry from...") you cannot use "far" in a positive sense. Give me some examples of Ngrams then...?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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NGrams is Google's frequency data from millions of books. It gives frequency graphs over time. The Corpus of Contemporary American English gives usage examples (so would the British National Corpus but it's not as accessible). The COCA http://corpus.byu.edu/coca/ has 39 references for "far from us" of which I would call half "positive." There are 3 references for "a long way from us." Personally, I remain befuddled by your position, unless you are dismissing the parsimonious ("positive" use of) "far away", "too far", and "so far" as fixed expressions which you're excluding (to my mind, on poor grounds) from consideration.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
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Idiomatic use of language is not really susceptible to logic -- all I can say is that if someone (in the UK) said to me "She's still living far from us" my impression would be that they were not a "Muttersprachler". Maybe American English differs from British English in this respect but I have, as far as I know, never heard in US films or read in US writing ""She's still living far from us" so I don't know where Ngrams is getting these usages from. Perhaps from postings from non-native speakers such as we ind in Duolingo?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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NB: I am certainly not saying that I think this translation is the most likely thing out of an English native speaker's mouth. I am contesting your strong assertion that "far" is not used to mean, well, "far" in positive senses in English. That said I do not find the English version proposed unnatural in the slightest, merely formal.

Where is NGrams getting the occurrences from? Books, i.e. professionally edited texts. Judging from the COCA there probably is a large fraction of "too far from us," "so far from us," "as far from us," "that far from us" but also a few straight up "[is/lives/whatever] far from us." By my count there were three to five occurrences unquestionably of this type in the COCA (have a look yourself; sorry I can't link straight to the results; just type "far from us"), in short exceeding the occurrences of "a long way from us." Does this result surprise me a little? Yes. But the COCA I suppose is mostly from written sources, and like I said, using plain "far" does sound more formal, which corresponds to writing.

1 year ago
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