Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/lifeofchuck

Danish questions?

I just started learning Danish just the other day, and I was wondering, if I became fluent in it would I be able to speak Norweigan and Swedish? I heard they are similar. Would it be able to speak it (Norweigan or Swedish), have to do a placement test, or start from the beginning like I did in Danish?

2 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/skuggstralar
skuggstralar
  • 18
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

I finished my Danish tree a while ago and have been practicing reading almost constantly since then, and I've found that my reading level in Norwegian - which I "studied" for about a week and then couldn't be bothered - was only a bit lower than my Danish. A lot of words are spelled differently and quite a lot of vocabulary is entirely different, but I can guess my way through quite a lot of things with... relative ease. Also, I find listening to Norwegian so much easier! I was looking for Danish episodes of a children's tv show (can't remember what it was... but it was on YouTube :P) and couldn't understand them at all without subtitles... but I could easily understand the Norwegian ones without subtitles.

As for Swedish, I think it's more different than Norwgian, but a lot of it does seem similar. I haven't really tried using much Swedish but I can understand Swedish songs pretty well and I'm using a Swedish-language course online to learn a little Sami.

But if I was asked to write something in Norwegian / Swedish... yeah, that's not happening. (That being said, I can't really write in Danish, so...)

Well, that's my experience: Norwegian is a little more difficult to read but a lot easier to listen to, and Swedish is a lot more difficult to read and listen to but it's stoll do-able. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ulfkastner
ulfkastner
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 20
  • 152

I concur with @skuggstralar. If you learn Danish, your reading comprehension of written Norwegian will be quite good without having learned any Norwegian. Your mileage with written Swedish is likely to be lower, but nonetheless you'll understand some written Swedish with Danish as your starting point.

Since Danish pronunciation is a unique challenge, you will find both Norwegian and Swedish to be comparatively easy to pick up.

In my estimation it would make sense to move from Danish to Norwegian, because of the more closely related grammar and vocabulary. By learning Norwegian you'd learn a language that sounds a lot more like Swedish, so progress in Norwegian would automatically increase your listening (and to a degree reading) comprehension of Swedish.

One of Scandinavia's most popular TV talkshow hosts is Norwegian and his program is being produced in turn by Swedish and Norwegian public television (I think its home is now the Swedish broadcaster). It makes for compelling practice, since the languages most commonly spoken on it are Swedish, Norwegian and English - http://www.svt.se/skavlan/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KierenMcCormack
KierenMcCormack
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 16
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1289

Well, if my input matters, I finished the Danish tree, and I found that I could understand almost 30% of Norwegian with ease, and I can understand a lot of Swedish, but not nearly as much as Norwegian.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeroenvandinther
jeroenvandinther
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 15
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1390

The most common language in the Nordics (Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland) seems to be Swedish. If your goal would be to learn a single language for that region, than Swedish is likely the most suitable language for that purpose. Danish, Norwegian and Swedish have a lot in common, but Finnish is completely different. It seems that Swedish is the second or third language in schools in Finland, so you should benefit from that when visiting Finland. Since Danish, Norwegian and Swedish are all in the group of Northern Germanic languages, you will go through those courses fairly fast once you have completed one of them. You may want to try a placement test, but the differences might hinder you from getting very far. However, even if you start from the beginning, you will go fast enough, and gain a better understanding of the differences. Native speaker from the Western Germanic language group (English, German, Dutch, Afrikaans, etc.) definitely have an advantage when learning Danish, Norwegian or Swedish, certainly when compared to for example native speakers from the Romance Languages group (Spanish, French, Portuguese, Italian, ...) because there is more overlap with their native language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smcdwer
smcdwer
  • 22
  • 17
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3

As others have said, you will be able to read some Norwegian and Swedish after having learned Danish. As for speaking, the pronunciation of Norwegian and Swedish is quite different to that of Danish. Danish pronunciation is more reduced than the other two, which are slightly more phonetic (many find Danish pronunciation the most difficult of the Scandinavian languages).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perzival.
Perzival.
  • 20
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

i'm danish and i don't speak neither norweigan or swedish, but i understand it pretty well, and i'm pretty sure it'll be a lot easier to learn these languages if you you are flurent in danish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fenjicka
fenjicka
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

I'm Danish and I study Swedish. For grammar, Swedish is pretty easy to me, but spelling and some vocabulary are very different from Danish. I simply don't understand spoken Swedish, as Swedish sounds very different from Danish. I understand Norwegian to the extend that I just can't be bothered studying it, it's so similar to Danish, that it sometimes seems it's just a dialect of Danish :)

2 years ago