https://www.duolingo.com/Mefhisto1

Swine not recognized as a translation of Schwein?

Duolingo rejected my translation of Schwein when I translated it into Swine. English is not my native language, but aren't Pig and Swine synonyms?

February 2, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mathso2

,,Schwein'' –> "swine" is technically a correct translation, but swine isn't the most common word in usage for the animal - we do use "pig" a lot more in English. If you feel that this should be accepted on an exercise you get wrong in the future, then just click on "Report a Problem" near the big red cross/green tick in the bottom left on the screen and then click the box that says "My answer should be accepted".

Good luck with your language studies :)

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MTegwyn

The use of swine in daily English is going to vary greatly based on where your living. I grew up in a rural farm community in the Great Lakes region where swine was as common in usage as pig or hog. I cant speak to its prevalence in UK English. corrected spelling of vary :)

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee415635

Not to pick, but just to help non-native English readers learn correct English vocabulary, the word "very" in the main post above should be spelled "vary" . Sounds like "very" but a totally different word.

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Fazac

Swine is old English, but still has some uses today. It was used for example in "Swine Flu" and can also be used as an insult "oh you swine", but these days you would not say "I have a swine".

Also Schwein in German is the name of the meat. In English you can only say Pork, not pig or swine.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist

Old English? I wouldn't say so. It isn't only used in insults and compounds, it's still used as an alternative word for the animal(s), although this may be largely limited to farmer's jargon and the like. I think there may be complications, though, because the German word definitely refers to one, while in English, I have the feeling that it commonly refers to mulitple pigs "these farmers breed swine".

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl

I thought that Schweinefleisch meant pork.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/gisberth

If the context is clear the "fleisch" is not needed. On a menue you may find Gemischter Braten (Rind, Schwein, Kalb) mit .....

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MTegwyn

Literally translated Swine (pig) Flesh (meat) but in English "Pork".

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanna35

Yes, it should be accepted.

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Asuva

"Swine," though not common, is a perfectly fine way to refer to multiple pigs. Swine would have originated as a plural of "sow" (female pig), just as "kine" or "kye" are archaic plurals of "cow." There is probably an archaic plural for "ewe" (female sheep), but I don't know it.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/lupus55

Swine is a perfectly acceptable synonym in English. Contrary to some comments ,it is used both for singular and plural. As far as the argument about it's description in some dictionaries, anyone can write a dictionary. If your dictionary defines swine as plural, buy a better class of dictionary.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MTegwyn

I spoke to some German colleagues today and one of them pegged why swine would be incorrect. Swine can apply to any porcine creature, specifically in Germany, both wild boar and domestic pig. Based on that, your translation would be incorrect because Schwien as used in Schwienfleisch must be domestic pig, therefore pork. Wild boar would be Wildschwein (wild pig).

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/hallorn

Interesting, I thought swine was a female pig, so swine=Sau in German?

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ashbolt

A female pig is a sow.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/person243

If you want to insult somebody in German by saying: you swine. The best translation would be: Du Sau. Although Germans also use: Du Schwein. Sau is more common in this respect.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist

These days "swine" might be used more often as a derogatory term than to refer to the actual animal. I wouldn't translate "Schwein" as "swine" unless I were sure it was used as an insult.

The word "pig" is also Germanic (comparable with the Dutch "big" for "piglet") while the name of the meat "pork" comes from the French "porc", probably because of the French invaders/noblemen who got to eat the meat that the English farmers produced.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

That's strange, I hear it to refer to the animal all the time. It might be where I live, or it might be because half the people I would normally be talking to read the King James Bible a lot. I suppose either could be possible.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TWolf2014

join Shedambotay French Club

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

What was your sentence? Sometimes, it means 'luck' or 'good fortune'.

February 2, 2016
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