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"¿Por qué no habló él con ella por teléfono?"

Translation:Why did he not talk to her on the phone?

5 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pcunix

I don't understand why people get upset about losing hearts.

My purpose in studying Spanish is to be able to understand and be understood and not be a nit-picking perfectionist. Therefore, when DL doesn't accept my translation but it's obviously "correct" in that an English speaker would not have missed any subtlety, I'm happy. I may have lost a heart, but so what? I got it "right" and I know that. I might ask if there is some subtlety I should be aware of, but I'm not annoyed or angry with DL.

I think DL is fantastic. I've learned more in the 40 odd days I've been here than I did after repeated passes through Rosetta Stone.

If there is a real mistake, report it. But realize too that as the sentences get more complex, there can be a lot of variations and DL simply may not have them. If you know you are "right", be happy, not frustrated!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Township

Thank you for that. I am learning Spanish and loving it. When I have to restart a lesson, I think "well, I need to go over it again, don't I?" and when I finish up a lesson I think "AWESOME! I'm having so much fun!". No need to take it personally, this is all part of the experience.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sfdoc

Cheers, after all it is all about the learning isn't it? I love to progress but we all know it tends to stick when we make a mistake...and that's when I go to the discussion and learn even more. A friend who spent time in Uraguay tells me native speakers speak incorrectly all the time...just like our poor English sometimes! I love DL. And all for free. I am going to Spain in the fall and I expect to be totally baffled...but I know more than I have ever known before...that's my measure of success. Have fun!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valgal707

Yes, I usually go through the first time looking at all the discussions. I learn more there than in the lessons! Then if I need a second run-through, it's fast, skip the discussions, and it really cements everything into long term memory.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

I agree, pcunix. But "three strikes and you're out" for even relatively minor mistakes can drag out the learning process. We are not all as patient as we should be. Nevertheless, three cheers for DL - it is a great learning tool.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pcunix

I usually go over every section at least twice anyway - the other passes sometimes have things the first did not.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattmoran

Why is the él after the habló? Could it have been before? "¿Por qué él no habló con ella por teléfono?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
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Both work.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Yes, there many ways to translate this sentence, but the computer does not keep track of all of them, and that is one of my frustrations with DL. But the idea, IMO, if one is studying Spanish, is to learn what the Spanish "means," rather than fuss too much over the details of the English side of the translation. Whether one translates "word for word" or "idea to idea" has little to do with whether one is a "real english speaker" and more to do with one's style of translation. I, for one, have no problem with "Why did he not talk to her on the phone?" as expressing the proper "idea." If one says "use the phone" one is introducing an totally different verb into the sentence.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeelouwho

how are you supposed to hear the difference between hablo as in I talk, and hablo as in he/she spoke?? (I know there should be an accent but I can't type it) I just mean when you're listening to someone speak how can you tell?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
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habló (with an accent, as in "spoke") has a the stress in the last "o", whereas hablo (no accent, as in "speak"), has the stress in the first "a".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonelier

To type it you would need to download a Spanish keyboard. On android and ios you should be able to do that through settings. The difference in the is the accent. From a hearing prospective hablo is more smooth and habló would have more of a weight on the accented o. It is hard to describe in words. Try listening to the difference from a YouTube video.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silkpjs

In this sentence I used "with" instead of "to", and it wasn't accepted. Hard to imagine 100 different answers for this sentence that doesn't include that one.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sfdoc

It is accepted now!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Acott

Oh ok, true. There is a slight difference in meaning of the two sentences. Thanks.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobbyGenest

I know we have to accept another languages sentence structure. BUT -

[Why not no talk he] with her on telephone

THAT is a real brain change.

1 year ago