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https://www.duolingo.com/larsvdm

också, med eller även?

larsvdm
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I am a bit confused with the use of the words också, med and även. When i read in Swedish I notice that the word med is often used instead of också (like: jag älskar dig med, instead of jag älskar dig också). Are both forms correct? and if so, is there a difference in meaning then? And when do you use the word även (i know that the word can be translated as even in some situations). Does it mean something like 'as well'?

Thanks for helping!

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Adiatorix
Adiatorix
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"jag älskar dig också" would mean "i love you too" as in "i love her, but i love you too" but "jag älskar dig med" means "i love you back".

both forms are completely understandable but not interchangeable; they do not mean the exact same thing. If you are not certain which one word to pick out of these three, then go with "också" which will make sense all the time, and probably be the word you are looking for in 9/10 times. "även" isn't used a whole lot, to be honest.

Good luck

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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I'm not sure most native speakers would agree with you about the difference in meaning, at least I don't. I actually don't feel there's any difference in meaning between 'också' and 'med' – to me, jag älskar dig också/med could both mean both things.

However, the difference is that the words work a little differently.

  • med can only be used in this meaning after a word, at least in Standard Swedish (it might work differently in dialects). The reason is probably that if you put it before the word, it won't be possible to tell if you meant this med or the much more common preposition 'med' which means 'with'.
  • med is a lot more colloquial. också is the neutral word that works in all contexts, but med does not look good in formal texts.

även can have a slightly different meaning from the other two. Sometimes it means the same as också, but it can also have a meaning that gets close to 'even' or in Swedish, till och med. So it can contain a nuance of opposition or that something is unexpected. In this use, we often see it at the start of sentences, where också could look slightly odd. Other than that, även can be a little more formal than också. And we don't use it after the word. Sometimes we use it for disambiguation. Here's a little overview:

1A. Jag älskar te, men jag gillar kaffe också 'I love tea, but I like coffee too'
2A. Jag älskar te, men jag gillar kaffe med 'I love tea, but I like coffee too'
3A. – not possible with även at the end.

1B. Jag älskar te, men jag gillar också kaffe – ambiguous, but probably should mean 'I love tea, but I too like coffee', though it could also mean 'I love tea, but I like coffee too'.
2B. – not possible with med here
3B. Jag älskar te, men jag gillar även kaffe unambiguous and means 'I love tea, but I like coffee too'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adiatorix
Adiatorix
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I am going to try to avoid being an arrogant prick, but... I do not agree with you. 2A sounds strange to me, I have never heard that being said ever, nor have i said it myself. And I am no scientist, just an ordinary swedish man, but I do not think that även, med och också are as interchangeable as you would like them. Thing is that no one would rude enough to point out for a foreigner the difference in a normal conversation, so even if you did use the exact right word no one would tell you, and they probably would not care either because the words are not different enough to provoke the feeling of "wtf?".

And as I said, även is not used often at all. Röda rummet maybe but otherwise not when normal swedes speak.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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I'm not really saying they're interchangeable, in fact I tried to point out how även has a different meaning, and that med is very colloquial.
I totally agree that även is rarely used and sounds formal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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I agree with Arnauti, there is no difference between them and they can be interchanged. Med is much more informal than också, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larsvdm
larsvdm
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that make sense, thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larsvdm
larsvdm
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Tack för er hjälp! So if I understand correctly: också and med are synonyms where med is more colloquial than också and can only be used at the end of a sentence. Även very formal and its meaning is closer to 'till och med' but there is some overlap with också and med too.

Perhaps 'med' is more common with persons instead of objects? (like: jag med, jag tror det med, jag älskar dig med). That's why example 2A might sounds strange to DeWit? It's a just a thought :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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That's a good summary. - It's possible there are more differences I didn't think of.
I think the problem with 2A isn't person/object, but rather that we mostly use med to replace a predicate. So a typical colloquial use would be a dialogue like: Ha det bra! Du med! - 'Take care! - You too!' where med replaces the whole predicate.

2 years ago