https://www.duolingo.com/anwark

Learning Arabic For English Speakers

Hello Duolingo learners

I just wanted to ask you if you [English learners] want to learn Arabic

I'm a native Arabic & I would like to ask Duolingo to open a new curriculum to native English to learn Arabic

So would you learn Arabic if you're an English?

Thanks

February 3, 2016

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheBramnotABram

Please do sign up. I'm pretty sure that they are already assembling a team, since I read in an interview with the founder that they hope to start developing an Arabic for English course this year :)

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Golden_Owl

oh,its a shame you did not provide any links to that interview

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Frankieswerve

One of my most requested languages, Hell yes!

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokurkan

Yes ! Definitely ! I'm from Moroccan background so I know the Maghrebi dialect. However I'd love to learn the standard language (Foshha). I think I would finish it within a month since I already know a huge part of the vocab and many grammar rules already present in the dialect.

In short it would be awesome ! Please go !!

February 3, 2016

[deactivated user]

    hi im in the same situation :) Kind of. You are better than me at grammar. I suck. I do understand a lot of darija, im almost better at foshha now :)

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/howk_tomo

    Answer = Yes, however:

    I have come across many English and non-English speakers who also were searching for good Arabic courses or should I say perhaps clarity ? Many gave up since the were put off either by the lack of clarity about 'which' version of Arabic to learn and if these dialects / versions are interchangeable etc. And second also by the daunting scriptures. Finally perhaps the constant religious 'sphere' surrounding it. Couple all this with a lack of a coherent and fun Arabic course and you have the answer to why so many were stopped in their tracks.

    Solve these issues in the minds of the searchers and you have a hit.

    Well all of this is of course my personal opinion.

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/TheBramnotABram

    I partially disagree. As for "which Arabic", there is a "standard Arabic", which they use at the UN, which can be used as a base-line Arabic for the other forms of Arabic. A similar problem exists for Spanish (where they opted for Mexican Spanish) and English (where US English was chosen), so it should be overcomable.

    As for the religious aspect of a language, every language has cultural values in it. The Arabic language is indeed linked to the Arabic culture, which is very Islamic in many ways. But at the same time you have that same problem with Japaneese which is very Sinto/Bhuddist, Hindi which is very Hindu, and some western languages being very secular. But that is part of the beauty of learning a new language. It is far more than just learning how to say the same thing with different words, it is learning to say new things!

    In fact, one of my top reasons why I would like to learn Arabic is so that I can delve into Islamic religious texts, even though I am not a Muslim.

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Xefjord

    From what I have heard, the different kinds of Spanish are mutually intelligible. And the different kinds of English are VERY mutually intelligible. While Arabic can differ greatly between the different types. I taught a kid from West Africa and two kids from Saudi Arabia and they were able to kind of communicate. But they admitted it was difficult. There is a Standard Arabic that few people speak and is used for writing. And that is what would be used. I wanted to learn Arabic, but I was mostly put off by its many dialects and lack of spoken standard, and by its religious aspect. However, I am interested in Farsi/Persian which is far more standard, indo european, and has a history I am very much interested in.

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/TheBramnotABram

    I can see how Arabic is less mutually intelligible than Spanish or English, this is probably because the language has been this widespread since the early Middle ages (compared to the 16th/17th century for Spanish and the 18th/19th century for English). However there is a standard Arabic dialect, which is continually reenforced by international communication in "UN-Arabic" on the one hand, and religious liturgy in "Qur'an-Arabic" on the other. Both UN and religious Arabic, I image to be very close (though I am not an expert), with UN Arabic probably being a more developed language given its necessity for a more extensive vocabulary.

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/kashwaa

    I'm a native Arabic speaker, and I can say with confidence that you are right about the similarity between UN-Arabic and religious-Arabic. Moreover they are the same except for the new words describe new inventions (most of them are derived from Arabic words, and some are borrowed from other languages). Speaking about the religious-Arabic, technically it is NOT religious, it's the original version of Arabic which was the daily spoken language 1400 years ago, and now we still understand and pronounce it very well, and write all of our texts in it. In addition, the non-Islamic Arabic texts are more than the Islamic. You can find a huge amount of poem, literature, philosophy, mathematics, sociology, etc... The Islamic literature itself includes two main fields that you might find interesting and valuable. 1-Historical recitation permissibility (how to know if a recitation or narration is trustworthy or not) 2-Fekh (which is about the logic of the language and how to extract the exact meaning from the text and avoid misunderstanding).

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/kashwaa

    slogger There is no difference -specially in grammar- between Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and the Arabic used in Qur'an and during the middle ages.

    If you mean the Arabic versions used in movies, modern songs and talk shows, no, those are not MSA. They are dialects and they're harder to begin with, because they are not used as written languages, so, The majority aren't interested in documenting their grammar and standards. Consider those dialects spoken only languages.

    So, by learning MSA you can dive into the whole Arabic literature. It will only take some extra time familiarizing your self with some obsolete words, that are no longer in use (or you can just look them up during reading). But, the grammar is the same.

    In addition, you can use MSA to communicate with any native Arabic speaker, no matter what his dialect is.

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/slogger

    Is there much difference (not just vocabulary but also grammar) between Modern Standard Arabic (I mean what is used on television news programs, etc., which I think must be like UN Arabic) and the Arabic used in the Qur'an and during the Middle Ages? From reading about Arabic I assumed that they were fairly different, but that is only an assumption. How hard would it be to learn to read Arab travel accounts and philosophy, etc. from, say, 800-1000 years ago after having learned MSA?

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/slogger

    > So by learning MSA you can dive into the whole Arabic literature. . . . In addition, you can use MSA to communicate with any native Arabic speaker, no matter what his dialect is.

    Thank you, kashwaa. That is just what I wanted to know.

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Xefjord

    I also kind of wondered where it would be easier to find traditional non islamic literature in Arabic or Persian. And it seemed like it would be easier in Persian.

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/TheBramnotABram

    Persian (or Farsi) is a fascinating international language. It uses Arabic script, but is in fact an Indo-European language, so it is easier to learn coming from English. I'm thinking of the stories of 1001 nights, not sure if that was originally in Persian or Arabic, but it is not a religious text.

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/obsessi

    1001 nights would be a very challenging for a beginner learner,or even an advanced learner for that matter

    February 6, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/hattieeee

    Definitely!

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Amgad

    Here's Luis Von Ahn's - Duolingo co-founder - take on the subject:

    February 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne

    Yes, very interested!

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Veyron.

    I took an arabic class at my university before, and although I learned quite a bit, I am convinced I could learn just as much or even more learning arabic through duolingo. Not to mention the cost factor as well lol

    Fully support this

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/kashwaa

    I've asked Duolingo to open this curriculum many times, and received no response. I'm ready and willing to contribute.

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickRansom

    100%! I will be learning Russian until it is released :)

    February 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/lenalingo

    Yes!! Plz add Arabic:)

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/lumpydumpling

    Definitely! I can't wait! :D

    February 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/staplesnout

    Arabic is one of the most often requested courses here, so the answer is: Of course!!!

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/lailavanberge

    yes please!

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/_Q_Q

    YES!

    February 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/SeanD2016

    I would love to try!

    February 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Amgad

    Anwark, please apply here :) Until then, you can help out in the (English for Arabs) course by applying here. It should help you understand how the incubator works before we start building the Arabic course.

    February 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasOKane

    Personally not, but it will be great to have an Arabic for English speakers course. Arabic is a major world language, and I'm sure such a course will be very popular

    February 6, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/FareehaKh

    of course!!!

    January 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Brittonsanders13

    Yes Please

    January 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/BryanAkin2

    Yes please

    March 5, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn468953

    Yes. Please. Thank you.

    March 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/MichelCroz

    yes I would... .

    August 20, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/DanielMont448763

    I have been waiting for a Duolingo Arabic course literally for YEARS. Please, please, please, please do it!

    August 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/DeenaDewan

    yes yes yes please!!!!!!!!!!

    September 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/satmary

    Please please please I really need to learn Arabic. That's the only language I've ever truly wanted to learn, I want to be fluent in it so badly, it's such a relevant language in 2017 too, so many people would benefit from this!

    November 2, 2017
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