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"Elle a vécu là pendant sept ans."

Translation:She has lived there for seven years.

4 years ago

96 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CristianoLars
CristianoLars
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Why not "has lived"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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First, "has lived" is accepted now. "Elle a vécu...." could be translated as "She lived", "She has lived", or "She did live". Choose the one that fits best in English...meaning you have to look at the context of the rest of the sentence to decide which English form to use. The French Passé composé does not map directly to a single English tense. It is not a trick or a trap. It is just not a cookie-cutter formula.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stancollins

"Elle a vécu...." could be translated as "She lived", "She has lived", or "She did live". Choose the one that fits best in English.

That's tricky, because they really don't mean the same thing in English. "She lived there for seven years" implies she no longer does. "She has lived there for seven years" implies that she still does. (I would say "she did live there for seven years" implies that she no longer does.)

I'm still having so much trouble with imparfait vs passe compose for reasons like these.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evatenn
evatenn
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_gs9 provides a very good, clear explanation in the discussion of the other similar sentence in this exercise (Ils ont vécu dans cette ville pendant dix ans). Everyone who thinks that their "She has lived..." answer should have been accepted should read _gs9's whole comment when they come to that sentence, but this is key:

*" Ils ont vécu dans cette ville pendant dix ans - They lived in this town for ten years (and they don't live here anymore)

<pre>Ils vivent dans cette ville depuis dix ans - They have lived in this town for ten years (and they still do). </pre>

I asked the French team myself in the contributor chat about this issue because I was having problems with it and they clarified and corrected the sentences."*

(We) English speakers see the passé composé and it looks like the present progressive. But it is used for completed past action(s). That, in addition to the fact that the sentence uses "pendant" rather than "depuis" (though elsewhere Duo occasionally uses "depuis" in sentences with the passé composé, so those rules are beyond me) make it necessary to use the English past. Here's a good discussion from Laura Lawless: http://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/passe-compose-vs-imparfait/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
oulenz
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I disagree, because English «she has lived there for seven years» can be used both in contexts where she is still living there, and in contexts where she no longer does.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calmstillflat

sorry, but - 'has lived', in your sentence can only mean that she STILL lives there.

the only way i can think of to use 'has lived' to talk about the past, is to list places lived in the past, i.e -

she has lived in manchester, sheffield, portsmouth, and rome.

(native of england)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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That is true, but the Passé composé is only used to refer to actions that are complete (finished). So the meaning of "she has lived there...." (she is still living there) would have to find a different expression in French. Perhaps "elle vit là depuis dix ans" = She has been living there for ten years. Note this uses the present tense verb with "depuis" to form "has been living". Strange, I know, but that's how it works. BTW, here is a great explanation of how Passé composé works in contrast to the imperfect tense. I encourage everyone to take a good look at it. https://languagecenter.cla.umn.edu/lc/FrenchSite1022/FirstVERBS.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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@George, if I can summarise seven webpages in a couple of sentences, passé composé is used when you're giving all the information and imparfait is used when you're leaving some information out.. "She moved there seven years ago" would use passé composé, "She was living there seven years ago" would use imparfait because it doesn't tell us when she started or stopped living there, or even if she stopped living there. Imparfait doesn't tell us if the action is complete or not, and it's possible that it is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calmstillflat

in your first example, the word 'has' does not belong. it would be - she lived there for...

in the second example, there's something missing. it would more likely be - she's lived there for seven years total /in all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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@George, I have just started reading through the link you provided. I like the way it uses humour in the explanations!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
oulenz
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Given that there isn't that much of a difference between your example and she has lived there for seven years, I'm trying to understand why you still don't like it. What do you think of the following conversations?:

Q: Can you list the places where she's lived? A: Easy, she has lived in Manchester, Sheffield, Portsmouth, and Rome. Q: Ok but some of these places don't count, I know that Portsmouth was only one month, right? There's a saying that you can only say to have really lived somewhere if you've lived there at least seven years. That's not true for any of these places, is it? Not even Rome, right? A: Well yes it is, she has lived there for seven years. She only moved to Sheffield in 2011.

Q: My daughter would like to move back to Australia, she's lived there before for many years, and now she's wondering whether she might be able to acquire Australian citizenship. A: How long was her previous residency? Commonwealth citizens have the right to apply for Australian citizenship if they've legally resided in the country for at least seven years at any point in their life. Has she? Q: Yes, she has lived there for seven years. Almost nine, in fact.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankOvares

With all due respect, I do no believe it is a matter of choosing. For one, I am more than tired with Duolingo because of the inconsistency with the use of the Compound Past, invariably favoring the use of the Simple Past (wow, I can't believe myself: I abhorred grammar before). In this particular case and since we are dealing with the Compound Past, the action it is still continuing, so the correct answer should be: "Elle a vécu là pendant sept ans.". Should we have been covering the Simple Past, then the action would be over and laying entirely in the past: "She lived there for (during) seven years." or "Elle vécut là pendant sept ans."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Hi, Frank. Wow, grammar, eh? Here's the thing. The French Passé composé does not map directly to a single English tense (but you knew that). It can map to the simple past or to the present perfect. While Passé composé refers only to completed actions, the English takes a curve in the road and also includes expressions like "she has lived there for seven years" which implies that she is still living there. Here's where it goes south. This English expression (the one where she is still living there) does not map to the Passé composé. To put it back in French, we would have to say something like, "elle vit là depuis sept ans" (she has been living there for seven years). Note that it uses the present tense verb with "depuis" to form this expression. That's just how it works. Recently I found a terrific explanation of how Passé composé is different from the imperfect tense. It is extremely helpful. I think you'll enjoy it. Take a look. https://languagecenter.cla.umn.edu/lc/FrenchSite1022/FirstVERBS.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

The right answer I was given this time is: "She lived down there seven years." Where does the "down there" fit in?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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I did a little more digging and found that there was perhaps an unintended carry-over from a similar sentence which used "là-bas" (over there, down there). It is not so much that "down there" is the "right answer" because the "right answer" is one that is accepted, n'est-ce pas ? Actually, "là-bas" would be the proper way to say "over there" or "down there". When you say "the right answer I was given", it will be based at least partly on what you wrote and provide you with another accepted answer that is similar to the one you wrote. You could say "here" or "there". At the moment, "over there" and "down there" are accepted even though they are slightly different. "She (has) lived there for seven years" is labeled as "the best answer". If this is not your experience, I suspect that you are using an app (?) and you may not see exactly the same thing that web users do. On the web version, the "best answer" will be displayed at the top of this page of comments. It does not vary.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

Considering the validity of the distinction you seem to be making between the simple past and the compound past, this might interest you: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/g/simplepast.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Kierz_
_Kierz_
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It should be elle vivait

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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That would be translated as "she was living". The expression, "she lived" does not say anything about the present although "she has lived" suggests that she lived there...and still does.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lenvm
lenvm
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That would call for the imperfect instead, because it would signify the incomplete process implied by the English "she lived there": "elle vivait là pendant sept ans."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I disagree. The passé composé, both here on DL and in other places, is commonly translated as "has [verb]ed".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Here is some very valuable information for the difference between Passé composé and imperfect by the University of Minnesota. It is the best explanation I have seen. Take a look. https://languagecenter.cla.umn.edu/lc/FrenchSite1022/FirstVERBS.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Not necessarily though. It's possible to use "has [verb]ed" to talk about completed actions. For example: "What all has she done?" "She has live here, she has lived there. She has traveled the world."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkArcher2

i think she has lived here for seven years would have to be the present elle vit la and it follows that elle a vecu can only have a past meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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You're right, Mark. "Elle vit là depuis sept ans" (She has been living there for seven years) makes it clear that she is still living there and has lived there for seven years. Passé composé is used for completed actions. Unfortunately, the "has lived" translation can be interpreted in two different ways in English so we have to be careful to realize the tenses do not correlate perfectly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xanderificus
Xanderificus
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Now accepted but rejecting "had lived".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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As already explained above, "elle avait vécu..." = "she had lived". It is the pluperfect tense, whereas "elle a vécu" = she (has) lived: Passé composé.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pandamaci
Pandamaci
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I listened carefully and wrote :"Elle a vécu là pendant cet an", but it was marked wrong, don't they both sound the same?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I can see what you mean. I'm not french but one thing I can wonder is that if you focus on one year as your translation does, french might expect you to use 'cette année'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pandamaci
Pandamaci
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I don't know, maybe. I guess only a native French speaker can tell . But even if you were right and French would expect 'cette année', would 'cet an' be considered wrong? or just not the best translation ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I'm not sure I understand. The french word année is feminine. It has to take cette. Cet is the masculine form before a noun starting with a vowel.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lyt50
lyt50
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Please, explain when "year" can be translated "an" (as in this phrase "... pendant sept ANS"). Only with numerals?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I don't understand your question. I don't understand what you mean by 'Only with numerals'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lyt50
lyt50
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why "seven years" can be translated "sept ans", but "this year" cannot be "cet an" (only "cette année"?)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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'sept ans' is a homonym to 'cet an'. Both should be accepted, I think, even though 'cette année' would be better, but I'm not sure....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stick.to.it

Yes, I also put "cet an". Not sure if that works with "pendant" or not, though.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rgrannan36
rgrannan36Plus
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I think part of the problem, for English speakers, is that "she has lived there" implies that she is still living there. My guess is that in French to express that she is still living there you would say something like "elle vit là depuis sept ans".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I learned that 'vivre' meant to live in the sense of 'aliveness', and based on that, I would have thought that habiter or demeurer would have been the proper verb here. Was I misinformed?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lalinguiste
lalinguiste
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I think you can also use "vivre" to mean "reside in a location" sometimes... I think people say things like "vivre à la campagne" ("to live in the country"). We can wait for a native speaker to confirm though.

What seems bizarre to me is the tense of the verb in this sentence. "She has lived there for seven years" should be "Elle vit/habite là depuis sept ans", with the verb in the present and "depuis" instead of "pendant", right? Or if you did want to use "pendant" and talk about living somewhere for seven years in the past, it seems like you would have to use the imparfait, and say "Elle vivait/habitait là pendant sept ans". But then this would be better translated as "She lived there for seven years". Other opinions?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tiny_tam

I'm not a native but my French neighbours definitely use vivre to mean habiter, e.g. je vis à la campagne. My opinion about the tense is the same as yours:

She has lived there for several years = elle vit là depuis sept ans She lived there for several years = elle vivait là pendant sept ans

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I see what you mean. Maybe only a french speaker can really clarify this. If the seven year period were over, then would the parfait passe seem more appropriate?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

A lot of people are attempting to justify the rejection of "She has lived there..." because they judge that that wording implies that she still lives there. I would like to point out that, while it can carry that implication, it is not necessarily the case.

To illustrate: I am the lawyer for Mrs. X, who was summarily evicted from her apartment for flimsy reasons, and the apartment is now being occupied by someone who is paying twice as much. Mrs. X is now living elsewhere. I go to the owner and I say: "You will not get away with treating Mrs. X so shabbily. She has lived there seven years without causing the smallest trouble, and the courts will not rule in your favour."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I agree with you that these things can be very subtle, but I still hold to the difference between the two. For instance, I tried exactly your example, but answered 'She lived there seven years' instead. As I said it, I immediately caught my breath and a voice inside me said that 'She lived ... ' was a bad legal tactic because it seemed to carry the implication that I was validating that she no longer lived there, while 'She has lived ... ' was somehow conveying the illusion that she still did (had a right to) even though she, in fact, didn't. Try it and see if you get the same feeling.

But all this may be beside the point because it's about english and not about french. French verb forms can't distinguish between the two. I still maintain that the thing that determines the 'lived' rather than 'has lived' english translation is the french use of 'pendent' rather that 'depuis'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I think you are quite right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmaddox00

I agree with shrinkdad here. I think that the only reason "She has lived there seven years" works in your example is that you are specifically trying to imply that she SHOULD be CONTINUING to live there (even if she is not at present). Technically, it doesn't really work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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She had lived there for seven years...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GunnarRica

would it mean anything different to say, "Elle a habitait là pendant sept ans."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kamuba
kamuba
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Why did it mark "she has lived there for seven years" incorrct?? =(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Duo error. It should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kamuba
kamuba
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ok, thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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still not accepted as of 16 dec 2014. I've reported it too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I have a feeling it's because 'She has lived there for seven years' would be translated as 'Elle a vecu la depuis sept ans' or 'Elle vit la depuis sept ans' because in your translation the implication is that she still lives there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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The French Passé composé maps to English simple past or present perfect. In English, "she has lived" could also be interpreted as she is still living there. But the Passé composé only refers to a completed action and does not include a continuing action. Certainly, using "depuis" would render it as "since" with the sense that it has been the last seven years (and she still lives there). The sentence "Elle a vécu là pendant sept ans" does not mean that the action is ongoing or continues to the present; it only expresses duration. To clearly express the idea that she has been living there for seven years (and is still living there), we have to use a different form in French: elle vit là depuis sept ans.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

This is one situation where the distinction in the English is quite clear - "she has lived..." almost certainly means she's still there; "She lived..." definitely means she doesn't. If the French sentence doesn't allow that she's still there, then "has lived" would be an incorrect translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junichiro.uno

Why not pendant is translated during.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

In french, 'pendent' means 'during'. In the english translation, 'for' has the same meaning of duration of time. Actually, using 'during' in the english translation would not be good idiomatic english. Hope this helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinRDC

what is the infinitive of this verb? Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

vivre :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinRDC

wow who'd have thunk it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattcolor
mattcolor
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For future reference, if you hover over verbs to show the translation(s) there is usually a "conjugate" button at the bottom.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jkhooker

Why pendant instead of depuis?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

"Pendant" means "during" (more or less) and implies only that the person's tenure in that place was 7 years - any 7 years. "Depuis", which is closer to "since", implies that the person has been in residence for the last 7 years - that is, she's still there.

There is a LOT of discussion on this page, which has not really come to any conclusions, regarding the verb form used. I believe that with "depuis" one usually uses the simple present tense in French, while we use the present perfect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/renataputri

Can it be "elle a vecu là pour sept ans" too?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I don't think so. My understanding is they mostly use "pour" for time spans in the future - she will be there for (pour) three years. I think that's right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/renataputri

Thank you :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marylanes

Why is "there" translated as "là" instead of a "y": elle y a vécu pendant sept ans"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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"There" can be translated in at least two ways. One is a dummy pronoun. "There are a lot of people in Australia." It doesn't mean "over there", it's just used as a way of starting the sentence. « Il y a beaucoup de gens en Australie. »

The second way means in a specific place. "She lived there for seven years". Here "there" is a specific place « Elle a vécu pendant sept ans. »

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

Are you sure about this? I agree that 'il y a' and it's variants are ways of translating 'there is', etc. But I thought 'y' and 'là' were roughly interchangeable with 'là' being used when you wanted to be emphatic. No?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Both of "there" and « y » have many meanings, some of which translate to each other and some that don't. There is another way of using « y », such as in « Allons-y ! », "Let's go!" which does roughly translate to "Let's go there", but it is still a dummy "there" even though it does sound like an actual place. It's quite complicated. This article might help explain it better than I can: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pron_adverbial.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marielanes

Near as I can tell this applies: "Y refers to a previously mentioned or implied place; it is normally translated by "there" in English. Y usually replaces a prepositional phrase beginning with something like à, chez, or dans. Since the the place had not been previously mentioned, and there was no "à" (to) there involved, Là was the proper choice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

Thanks. Very helpful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nachoigles4

Why not: She has lived during seven years?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I'm assuming you accidentally left out "there" ( là ), and your question is about using "during". "During" doesn't work in this sentence because it doesn't really say how long she lived there - "during" could be all or any smaller amount of time within the period mentioned. (Example: It rained during the night - maybe it rained all night, maybe just for a few minutes). We say "for" to describe a length of time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

DianeM makes a good point. Part of the problem is that 'during' in english is ambiguous in the sense that it can refer to a total time period or any part of it depending on context. In french, as I understand it, 'pendant' refers to the entire time. If you want to refer to a moment (or subinterval?) of the whole time, I think the french use 'lors de'. See http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/quand-vs-lorsque.htm,

Also, the sentence 'She has lived there during seven years' just doesn't sound like good english. I don't think and english speaking person would ever say it. They would use 'for' to refer to the entire time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UmbralDemiurgico

She has lived there DURING seven years should be accepted, according to my knowledge.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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That's a literal translation but it's not good English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

To clarify this further since I suspect that english is not UmbralDermiuggico's first language. The use of 'pendent' in the french instead of 'depuis' implies that she lived there for seven years but does not live there anymore. That is conveyed by the english translation, 'She lived there for seven years', i.e., the simple past tense. If 'depuis' had been used, the french would mean that she has lived there for seven years and still lives there. The english would convey that by using the continuing past, 'She has lived there (or: has been living there) for seven years'.

French does not have a continuing past tense form, so it uses two different prepositions to convey the difference. In any case, 'during' would not be used in normal english. 'For' would be used in both cases because that's normal english usage, and because english conveys the difference by the verb tense whereas french needs a different preposition to convey it. Hope this makes this clearer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AshtonJC
AshtonJC
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Could we say "année"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBaer1
JBaer1
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Could anyone explain any difference implied by the verb "habiter"? Would it be possible to use it for this sentence?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yucca-Moh
Yucca-Moh
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Does "elle y a vécu pendant sept ans" grammaticly correct?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Yes, I believe it is.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel589120

Why isn't "She did live here for seven years." an acceptable answer? It corrected me to "She has lived here for seven years.", if I were to put that, will it tell me the answer should be "She lived there for seven years."?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vabradley

'lived' and 'has lived' are the same thing/tense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrinkdad

I think this thread suffers from not having native french speaker input to clarify these questions.

As well, for the sake of non natives english speakers, although 'lived' and 'has lived' both refer to the past, they don't always carry the same implications. For example, in response to the question, 'Does Fred live around here?', the response, 'Fred lived around here for seven years', carries the implication that he did but doesn't anymore. The response, 'Fred has lived around here for seven years', implies that he has and still does. In other words, 'has lived' can sometimes, but not always, have the implication of the past continuing into the present.

However, the sentences, 'He ate the pie', and 'He has eaten the pie' do mean the same thing. I think a lot of the equivalence or différence depends on the presence of a secondary clause or phrase (for seven years).

Please refer to a grammar text to clarify these suble differences between the simple and 'continuing' past.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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Here's my opinion (and I am not a native French speaker.) "Elle a vécu là pendant sept ans" suggests that she lived there for seven years, but does not live there anymore.

In English, if we say, "She has lived there for seven years," this sentence suggests that she still lives there. So, in this case, we would have to translate this sentence into English as, "She lived there for seven years."

If we wanted to translate, "She has lived there for seven years" (and she still lives there) from English to French, we would need to say, "Elle vit là depuis sept ans."

I hope this makes sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rungus
Rungus
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No, 'lived' and 'has lived' are very different tenses with different meanings. The first is the past simple tense and the other is the past perfect. The first implies that she doesn't live there any more, which is the same as the French sentence above that uses the passé composé, wheras the other does not and is not. As you lear a second language you begin to realise how complicated your own language is grammatically, especially if your native language is English, which is very complicated indeed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LBoksha
LBoksha
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If you find out about these things in your own language from a book, chances are it's made up by some overzealous grammarian and not actually based in the language at all. Pedants with an air of authority coming up with prescriptive grammar (especially of the "You can't do X" kind) is how we ended up with absurd rules like not being allowed to end a sentence in a preposition. It's native speakers that determine what's correct; this is especially true for English, which does not have a central governing body.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Except that Passé composé has three (make that four) possible English equivalents. For example, j'ai dansé can mean:

  • I danced (simple past)
  • I have danced (present perfect)
  • I did dance (past emphatic)
  • I have been dancing (present perfect continuous)

http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/passecompose.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rungus
Rungus
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I may have been overly confident in my reply then. In this particular sentence, can the French mean something that continues up to the present and/or can the English 'has lived' mean something that doesn't continue up to the present? If no to both of these things, then 'has lived...' is a wrong translation, in my opinion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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What I am finding is that in some ways, French is very precise. In other ways, it is so broad as to allow sharply variant, even seemingly contradictory interpretations. The problem is not the French; the problem is not the English. The problem is that the verb tenses do not correlate perfectly. We must ask, "What does it really mean?" Passé composé refers to actions that were completed in the past. But in English, "she has lived" includes the idea that the action has continued into the present moment. To be clear about it, we would say either:

  • Elle a vécu là pendant sept ans = She lived there for seven years (but she no longer lives there)
  • Elle vit là depuis sept ans = She has been living there for seven years (and still does)
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenschooling

In spite of several posts below saying that "had lived" is a correct translation, it still docked me a heart. Surely has lived is at least as valid?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmaddox00

I don't think "had lived" is a correct translation. As mentioned above, I believe that would be translated differently. I also put "She has lived here for seven years," but I am beginning to think that the reason DL has not changed the answer is because, as several people have suggested, "has lived" implies that she continues to live there, while perhaps "Elle a vecu" is stating something that is now over. I hope that sitesurf or another native speaker can clarify this at some point!

3 years ago