"Demain nous allons au tribunal !"

Translation:Tomorrow we go to court!

1/15/2013, 11:50:24 PM

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NessaNessaJoy

That exclamation point makes me smile. "WOOO! Tomorrow we're going to COURT!! YEAH!!"

1/15/2013, 11:50:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Goran12
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I read it more as: "Oh no! Tomorrow we go to the tribunal! What if they sentence us to jail?" Panic is as good as excitement among reasons for exclamation mark as good. Though it is not that funny.

3/15/2014, 1:44:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mjlopeze
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peut-etre ils sont des avocats :O (correct me is that "des" is right pleaseeee)

10/6/2013, 7:13:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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No, that's not right. You would say, "Peut-être qu'ils sont avocats". To understand why, see here: http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm

10/28/2013, 9:36:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

What does that sentence mean?

2/15/2014, 4:47:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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It means "Maybe they're lawyers"

2/15/2014, 5:17:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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"Peut-être" means maybe. peut (may) + être (be)

2/15/2014, 5:41:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

Thanks. But could you break it down. I don't see "maybe" in there at all.

2/15/2014, 5:34:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

@KoalineACNL "demain nous allons au tribunal" means "tomorrow we go to the court".

11/25/2014, 12:02:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/OlderThanRome
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Why not "we will"? It's tomorrow after all.

1/6/2014, 2:30:15 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Future tense not used in the French example.

If we were actually translating a passage into English (as opposed to doing learning exercises), using the future in English would likely be a perfectly good translation, but I think the idea here is to try and stick a little more closely to a direct translation (unless there's an "expression" involved).

1/20/2014, 12:47:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/small_world
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This IS actually in the future tense in the French example. The French often use the simple present to express the future when it's something like "tomorrow", "next week", etc. In most cases it is actually incorrect to express the future tense this way in English. For example, it is incorrect English to say "I see you tomorrow" or "I call you tomorrow". You should instead say "I will see you tomorrow", or "I am going to see you tomorrow". There are some exceptions, for example scheduled events that are outside of your control, like "the train leaves in five minutes". http://esl.fis.edu/grammar/rules/future.htm. Honestly, I'm not even sure which category this sentence falls into, especially since no one would ever say we are going to THE court.

1/31/2014, 7:31:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Well, it is "present" in the grammatical sense, not "futur", but I agree that it is used here to indicate a future event, which is also true of the English translation "Tomorrow we go to court".

2/1/2014, 5:06:28 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/small_world
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True, I just wanted to point out that if you always try to do a direct translation of a sentence that expresses the future via the present tense, you won't always get a correct English sentence...even if the sentence was perfectly correct in French.

2/1/2014, 7:11:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Fair enough.

2/1/2014, 8:25:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sorin1B
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Why only "court" and not also "courthouse"?

7/17/2013, 10:56:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/peachacid

I have the same question. In English we would say, "Tomorrow we go to court" or "Tomorrow we go to THE courthouse!" We wouldn't say, "Tomorrow we go to the court," and we'd almost never say, "Tomorrow we go to the tribunal!"

10/18/2013, 6:30:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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It's similar to the difference between "We're going to school" and "We're going to the school". It's an event rather than a place when the article is omitted.

You could say "We're going to the court", but hardly anyone says it that way.

10/28/2013, 9:42:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ChanBeauge

Preachit or Judgeit you are right on the money

4/19/2014, 1:28:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GraemeJeal

In the U.K. there are eg. Industrial tribunals for unfair dimissal cases separate from courts. It would be quite correct to say we are going to the tribunal.

2/7/2019, 10:09:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NessaNessaJoy

Going to court is how we say it up here in Michigan. I guess we're just rednecks.

10/21/2013, 1:26:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Svennedude

'Tomorrow we are going to the tribunal' marked 'tribunal' wrong. I have reported it.

10/11/2017, 12:59:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Multi0Lingual4
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Me too. It was accepted in another example. Still not accepted January 2nd, 2018.

1/2/2018, 9:08:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/abruzzilisa
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Or Friday 9 March 2018 !

3/9/2018, 6:43:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/pflinders

Something subtle - in English if I say "Tomorrow we go to court" it would generally mean that we are going to be part of the proceedings either as defendant, plaintiff or perhaps part of the legal team. If we say "Tomorrow we are going to the court" it is quite likely we are merely planning on a visit. The presence (or not) of the definite article is what makes the subtle difference in meaning - how does one translate the two meanings into French?

12/26/2014, 11:45:15 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian400723
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So how do you say in french - Tomorrow we go to the tribunal! as duolingo did not accept this as a translation.

11/10/2017, 7:25:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoLAD
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I also cant wait to play tennis

8/19/2014, 7:58:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sc_ville
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"tomorrow we go to the courthouse" should be accepted, no? how come it's not?

2/8/2015, 1:08:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

DL didn't think of it? My dictionary does say that "tribunal" can be a courthouse, not just a proceeding. Try reporting it.

2/8/2015, 3:41:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/abruzzilisa
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“Tomorrow we are going to the tribunal!” Wasn’t accepted, could anyone help me out please?

3/9/2018, 6:43:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel589120

Why is "Tomorrow we go to the tribunal!" accepted in this example, https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/1033005, and not here? They are identical!

11/19/2018, 8:33:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/john-keith

My sister in law advises a tribunal, so it's a specialist body of people with a job to do. It may or may not meet in a court or courthouse. Appellants attend a tribunal in UK without having to speak of 'going to court'. The French equivalent body may have a different designation, but is 'aller au tribunal' to be translated exclusively as 'going to court'? And what does this mean anyway? Going to attend or participate in a judicial process, wherever it is held? Or going to a court as a place? As in - I'm going to court to get the document signed.

12/24/2018, 2:28:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/philipo79

For some reason "the tribunal court" isn't accepted. Take away the word court and it just sounds weird to me.

4/16/2014, 5:48:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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le tribunal is not "tribunal" or "tribunal court", it is just "court" or "courthouse". http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/french-english/tribunal/78559

5/10/2014, 10:34:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Sounds ok to me. A tribunal is a court, so "tribunal court" sounds redundant to me.

4/16/2014, 6:07:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/philipo79

I imagine its common to use "tribunal" alone if someone is in court alot or in places where there are a lot of law suits. Luckily the tribunal court isn't that familiar to me.

4/16/2014, 6:59:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/M1ck3yJ0

"Tomorrow we are going to the COURTHOUSE" is the most natural English sentence, and it isn't accepted. >.<

12/24/2014, 10:32:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TerjeKlevenip

Why is "We go to the tribunal tomorrow" not accepted? Can anyone explain?

12/29/2014, 2:40:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I do not see anything wrong with it, so I would report it if I were you. I don't believe DL is that fussy about the order of words if the meaning is the same, but I may be mistaken.

12/29/2014, 3:23:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TerjeKlevenip

Thanks, let us wait for other comments, if any

12/30/2014, 8:48:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/PlaydeadzI

Quite a suspenseful sentence

1/13/2018, 8:22:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraGemin

Surely 'the law court' or 'court of law' is acceptable ?

10/7/2018, 12:28:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

"Law court" sounds so weird. Some things are idiomatic and should be left just as they ought to be. In fact, your suggested order of words is literally non-existent in any books written in the last two centuries: https://tinyurl.com/y8wk5ym3

10/7/2018, 2:46:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KateMcCabe4

Three questions before this one, I used court for the translation of tribunal and was marked incorrect. DL used tribunal as the translation of tribunal. Now I put We are going to the tribunal and was marked incorrect. How can tribunal be tribunal in one sentence and tribunal be court three sentences later. It seems to me that they are interchangeable but I was marked incorrect using either.

11/29/2018, 6:40:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GraemeJeal

Why has tribunal suddenly become court. The tribunal has been in Paris, previously. Why can't we go to the tribunal tomorrow even if it is in Paris!

2/7/2019, 10:04:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Suddenly? I don't think it just happened. It has been that for quite a while: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/french-english/tribunal

2/8/2019, 3:37:06 AM
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