"Mae coffi gwyn gyda llaeth gan Dewi Lingo."

Translation:Dewi Lingo has white coffee with milk.

February 5, 2016

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aadambialas

Could someone explain the syntax of this sentence in detail? I don't get why the preposition "with" - gan/gyda/whatever seems to conjugate accorting to the subject or object (according to the tips & notes section)

February 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magrise

It's the same syntax as Irish (I use Irish as a reference point since I see you have level 14 Irish): verb to be + thing we have + preposition + person who has.

Here's an example in Irish ex: ta + madra + ag + Dewi = ta madra ag Dewi = Dewi has a dog.

The same in Welsh would be: mae + ci + gan + Dewi = mae ci gan Dewi = Dewi has a dog.

So in this sentence we have: verb to be: mae

thing we have: coffi gwyn gan llaeth

preposition: gan

person who has: Dewi Lingo

mae + coffi gwyn gan llaeth + gan + Dewi Lingo = mae coffi gwyn gan llaeth gan Dewi Lingo = Dewi Lingo has white coffee with milk.

(Whoever can, please feel to correct me if I've made a mistake, as I'm not fluent in either Irish or Welsh).

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aadambialas

Thanks, it seems logical, but my main problem is with the propositions 'gyda/gan" which according to tips&notes are both form of welsh equivalent of 'with' and it seems it kinda conjugates, and I must admit that conjugating prepositions creep me out. I thought that it's like the irish contracted preposition+pronoun pairs, but there are no pronouns here.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhatcher88

This may help to aid with this section: duolingo is trying to cover north and south Welsh. 'GYDA' is south wales for 'WITH' where 'gan' is 'has'.

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinV.

Thank you. I can't wait until they figure out a way to label this sort of distinction. :)

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magrise

Welsh has inflected prepositions just like Irish - this is a feature of all modern Celtic languages. You'll have to learn and memorize them (I guess at some later point in the course these will be dealt with more thoroughly...).

The same can be found in other languages, Hebrew and Arabic spring to mind.

Why? It is just how the languages developed over the millennia.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y_ddraig_las

er.... white coffee already has milk in it???

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhatcher88

oh it could be with cream!

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y_ddraig_las

ych a fi!

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hatakend

I've just finished a section where they had curry and salad. I does make you wonder about Welsh food, doesn't it?

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SiblingCreature

Yeah, "white coffee with milk" seems somewhat tautological

May 22, 2016
Learn Welsh in just 5 minutes a day. For free.