"Cerdded"

Translation:To walk

2/5/2016, 7:22:32 PM

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MorbidManatee

Just when I thought I had rolled Rs down, they add a rolled R followed by dd... my poor tongue can't handle it. XD

7/8/2016, 7:10:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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Haha. Try cartref (home) lol!

7/8/2016, 7:21:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MorbidManatee

Oh my goodness gracious... XD

7/8/2016, 7:41:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/chrismjenkins

Is the infinitive (to walk) and present participle form ([to be] walking) always the same in Welsh?

2/5/2016, 7:22:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Also, I think, the gerund "walking" (the form that acts as a noun, as in "walking is good for you").

The form is often called a "verbal noun" or "verb noun" in Celtic linguistics as it has several noun-y properties. (For example, "my walking" in the sense "(the fact) that I walk" is formed with the same possessive construction as "my shoe".)

2/6/2016, 11:39:07 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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This is a good explanation. It's a verbnoun because sometimes it has verbal properties and sometimes more nominal.

Interestingly, with phrases formed with possessive pronouns in English, the pronoun refers to the subject: "my eating, my seeing, my hearing". In Celtic languages the pronoun usually refers to the object: fy mwyta i, fy ngweld i, fy nghlywed i (eating me, seeing me, hearing me).

3/17/2016, 1:54:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
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Yep assuming you are using the "Dwi'n (past participle form). There are also ways of changing the ending of verbs to the present tense e.g Rhedeg=run(Infinitive) becomes "Rhedaf i" for "I am running". These are rarely used though unless they are in phrases that are used often e.g the "wch" ending in "Os gwelwch chi'n dda" is the present conjugation for the formal you. Don't worry about these though I'm half way through my first language Welsh GCSE in school and the only reason I know them is because I asked my teacher. (EDIT: The forms I said weren't used much are actually still used in the south

2/5/2016, 8:54:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Gelgisith
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I have a real problem telling 'dd' and 'f' apart...

1/16/2017, 9:44:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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Dd is the "th" in English "the", f is the "v" in English "van". Do you have difficulty because these sounds don't both occur in your native language?

1/17/2017, 12:13:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Gelgisith
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No, it's computer voice that throws me off. I have little trouble telling words like 'that' and 'vat' apart on TV.

1/17/2017, 9:42:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae
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Yeah, the computer on this voice isn't always the best. I'm sure you'll be fine listening to real people speak Welsh.

1/18/2017, 11:11:34 AM
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