"¿Quieres cambiar el volumen?"

Translation:Do you want to change the volume?

February 7, 2016

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

Puse "Want to change the volume?", y me dijo que eso era mal. Está bien. No es formal, pero es natural decirlo. Se implica que tú eres el sujeto. Ya lo reporté.

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

En inglés informal a menudo omitimos el "do you" en preguntas del tipo "do you want...?" pero no es correcto. La regla es que una oración completa necesita ambos sujeto y verbo. La única excepción es que se omite el sujeto de una declaración imperativa ("go outside!").

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

Ahhhhhh, ahora entiendo. Gracias. c:

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Russell723801

I'm a native English speaker and I put that, too. In informal speech the subject can be implied. In other words, native speakers would say what you wrote all the time in real conversations.

May 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

Nov 2, 2016 - Does 'volumen' only refer to measurement of space? In English we talk about the volume of the sound as well.

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

"Volumen" has both meanings in Spanish, too.

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

Gracias, Sainio.

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

I think its a metaphor ... sound filling space more when it is louder ?

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moley0603

I think that Duo is right to adhere to the correct English translation. From my experience, most English people would not drop the subject pronoun.

May 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffAnders694718

"Do you wish to change the volume?" was not accepted. Why?

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

July 4, 2017 - Wish to = desear , Want to = querer There is a lot of semantic overlap, but people speaking either language make a distinction between them.

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnV.Wylie

If you say "Want to change the volume" the "You" is implied.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

It's implied, and it's common enough in informal speech, but the sentence isn't technically complete or correct without the subject. I understand that that sounds a little nitpicky, but it's actually really important, because these sentences are used in both this course and the reverse course (English for Spanish speakers). That means that if the Spanish team accepts "want to change the volume?" as a translation here, the translation will also be accepted in the reverse course. That's problematic, because in Spanish, it's common and completely okay to omit subjects. In English, on the other hand, a sentence with no subject isn't complete unless it's an order. So the reverse course has to teach Spanish speakers not to omit the subjects, and it's really hard to do that, if it accepts translations like "want x?" or "want to y?" with the subject omitted.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnV.Wylie

Agree with most you say, however "Isn't technically correct" does not make hundreds of well understood expressions un-understandable or unusable language. If i stub my toe and say, "damn!" most English speakers will understand that I am upset with my own clumsyness and stupidity. If I try to explain more it will probably just confuse the issue. Language is continually evolving, and looking at those changes and discussing them is part of the process. What are considered dirty swear-words in other countries, are just part of normal language in Mexico, and can cause fist-fights or worse if not understood in their local meanings.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

That's all true, but we're not talking here about a simple interjection, or about variations in vocabulary. We're talking about a complete Spanish sentence, which has a common complete-sentence translation in English. And while allowing an incomplete English sentence as a translation wouldn't do any harm to English speakers learning Spanish, it adds confusion to a topic that's ALREADY confusing for many Spanish speakers learning English.

There are situations in which, for the sake of avoiding stilted English, the course does accept English phrases with the subject dropped. (For instance, it uses "see you tomorrow!" as a translation of "¡nos vemos mañana!" because "we will see each other tomorrow!" is a long and relatively unusual way to say goodbye.) But cases in which that's necessary do tend to cause confusion, and they're actually fewer and farther between than you might think. In the case of this sentence, there's nothing wrong with the complete translation (it doesn't sound stilted or awkward), and the upside of allowing English speakers to use the informal version doesn't seem to me to be worth the downside of making the reverse course more confusing.

[Disclosure: I'm no longer an Incubator contributor, so my opinions are mine alone, and I don't speak for the current Spanish-English team. =) ]

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brackenwood3

What is wrong with "alter" the volume/

October 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

Nothing: it's probably just a translation that's not in the database. If you run into it again, you can report it with the "Report a problem" button and the "my translation should be accepted" option.

October 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertDuke

The wasnt listed as an answer and so was marked wrong... this question/response is a Fail.

January 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khai7Soccer

In Espanol it can also mean speed apparently?

November 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MickeyWils

Any reason we couldn't use quieras here,?

March 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MogensBech1

Would you mind to change the volume?

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertKinzie

Turn it up to 11!

December 7, 2017
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