https://www.duolingo.com/LeeGowan

Terrific Language

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Anybody know when it lost its case-system? That fascinates me how a homogeneous society like the Nordic states would drop it, whereas ones like the German-states, which I assume would historically have received far more foreigners, in addition to those already in the German-speaking territories with different mother-tongues; like all the ethnic groups within Austria-Hungary.

3 years ago

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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On the other hand the Norwegian people did visit many foreign countries...... So which country was in contact with more foreigners would be debatable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundgeirr
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This is what wikipedia says:

The plagues that struck Europe in the Middle Ages came to Norway in 1349 (Black Plague), killing over 60% of the population. This probably precipitated the current process of language development. The language in Norway after 1350 up to about 1550 is generally referred to as Middle Norwegian. The language went through several changes: the grammar was simplified, including the abandonment of grammatical cases and the removal of personal inflection of verbs. A vowel reduction also took place, in some dialects, including in parts of Norway, reducing many of the last vowels in a word to a common "e".

The phonemic repertoire also underwent changes. The dental fricatives, represented by the letters þ and ð disappeared from the Norwegian language generally merging with their equivalent plosive sounds, represented by t and d respectively.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Norwegian#Middle_Norwegian

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeGowan
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Thanks, very good explanation!

3 years ago
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