"Mae e eisiau tost."

Translation:He wants toast.

February 8, 2016

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie

Is this "tost" used for "toast" as speech, greeting, too?

February 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

No, according to my dictionary that would be "cynnig llwncdestun" (To offer a toast). Also side note the welsh version of "cheers" is "iechyd" which means health.

February 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie

Giolch mawr :)

February 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/NoelGoetowski

Who doesn't?

March 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DmitryReve

Mae is pronounced as english my?

September 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

Yep. Ae when it's in the final syllable of a word is like English "eye".

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchietobe

I heard "dost ". Why is this?

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

Yeah, you're right, there's a problem with the TTS.

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ivonne66

In all the other lessons eisiau has been "want" but now it means "need"? Why do i have it wrong?

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
  • 1542

The primary meaning of 'eisiau' is want. An alternative translation is 'need'. Both are correct for all the sentences with 'eisiau'.

This particular sentence shouldn't have flagged up 'need' as a primary meaning, we'll look into it.

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

Both are correct for all the sentences with 'eisiau'.

There is some overlap - eisiau has a broader meaning than just English "want", but "want" and "need" aren't both correct for all sentences. It depends rather on the construction, for example:

Mae Siân eisiau canu would be "Siân wants to sing" not "Siân needs to sing"

Mae eisiau i ti fynd would be "You need to go" rather than "You want to go"

Mae eisiau car arnoch chi could be either "You want a car" or "You need a car"

August 14, 2017
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