https://www.duolingo.com/856pm

How long did it take for you to complete the tree and what level were you?

This is a question for those who've completed the tree in any language: How long did it take for you to complete and what level were you?

4 years ago

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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Three months and one week to complete the Portuguese tree at level 12. But I studied for around five hours every day. The method I adopted was to begin each exercise with a clean A4 sheet of paper next to my computer and head it with the name of the lesson (Prepositions 1 for example). After each of the twenty questions I would write down the Duo question and my response. In those cases where I was incorrect I would highlight the question with a marker pen and show the correct Duo answer below my wrong one. The physical act of writing each word repetitively helped imprint them into memory and the highlighted errors were reviewed on a random basis to hopefully prevent a recurrence thereof. Much credit must go to a really special guy by the name of Paulenrique who is one of the experts on the Duo team.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danidanger101

Awesome advise! I'd try doing that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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A couple of lingots - good luck and try, then try again! One day it's suddenly like a light has been switched on and everything becomes so clear and obvious!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EhsanCharolia

You have earned my respect! You have done so many languages its befuddling! that's amazing... I wish to be like you some day.. .some day..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnSmyth

Lahure... I literally want to bask in your language learning glory. You are above level 20 in 5 languages... I am so inspired and fired up. I give you a lingo good sir

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/856pm

Now that's dedicated. I just do a few hours of practice per day, and I'm at lv11 French (started in October) and lv6 Italian (started last Sunday).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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Well done! You deserve a token of admiration 856pm. Herewith a Lingot for your dedication and achievements. Merry Christmas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/856pm

All right! Thanks! Take 2 lingots, Merry Christmas!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fergusfettes

Haha, I love that you gave him his Lingot back with interest! Here, have three for your confusing generosity (and don't give me any back!)

Came here because I just finished German in 23 days. That's why I'm throwing Lingots around like it ain't no thing ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CseeC
CseeC
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HOW?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianJosh
AdrianJosh
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i had 29 days and how can you do that in 23 days? i spend an hour to 4hrs everyday... well in studying french too. but that's reakky fast

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealDaveRuby
TheRealDaveRuby
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He probably skipped some lessons. My mom wanted to test how fluent she was in English from spanish and she was able to finish the tree in two weeks. She just skipped ahead and tested out of every skill.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Llama_Spanish

You finished german that quickly? Well, I started yesterday and I'm at lvl 7 lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Okmanimcoo

you are so kind here take a lingot

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivy711
Ivy711
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Wow! Nice strategy (and commitment!) Here's a lingot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/classysuitbeard

Good advice

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MS_Genius88
MS_Genius88
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That's what I used to do, but it's painstaking. Effective though!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rarcher2010
rarcher2010
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18?!!!! UGH! Errgggg! Ugh.... my competitiveness is killing me. Here's 18 lingos.... ughhhhhh!......fiiiine.... I'll keep trying! UGH!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Llama_Spanish

Oh wow, you're really dedicated

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zephy5

I am trying to implement your trick but I fear I may not have understood everything, I need your help.
So only after 20 questions would you stop practicing on the computer and write down all the questions that Duolingo asked (with your answers)? 20 seems plenty, yes I may have a sponge memory.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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To zephy5. My first tree was a couple of years ago. At that time Duo operated differently in that each lesson consisted (as now) of a number of questions. You were given three 'hearts' at the start of each lesson. When a question was answered incorrectly you lost a heart.

If you lost all three hearts before correctly answering all the questions you had to redo that lesson from the first question. As we all know, a few earlier questions in most lessons are repeated as you approach the end of the lesson. It was so annoying to repeatedly have one or two questions remaining to complete the lesson, but with no remaining hearts. As a result I adopted the extremely tedious and time consuming approach of writing out each question and answer mainly in order to be able to refer to them and find the appropriate reply. Thus preventing the necessity of having to return to the start. There is a definitive 'cementing of learning' aspect to be gained from the pen and paper approach, though.

With the current 'plus and minus' cursor system the above approach (my 'trick' as you refer to it) is definitely inadvisable from a time factor given that you can continue any lesson after three incorrect answers in terms of the current Duo system. Perhaps in those couple of instances where your reply was not accepted you may wish to transcribe those ones to refer to later in the lesson in the event they reappear.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zephy5

Thanks a lot for taking time for such a detailed reply.
I have have been following 'Learning How To Learn' MOOC on coursera and your trick (ok, method) is coherent to what has been taught.
I agree with you that writing sentences for newer version may not be the best.
I am now doing 'deliberate learning' for hard words. That is, I try to imagine situations and sentences using the words that cause problem. I some times write them down to cement the learning. It seems to be working well!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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What a coincidence! I heard about MOOC for the first time on a talk show an hour ago! Would be so nice to hear from you when you get the next of the many trees that you will attain! Cheers, Mark.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorno1
jorno1
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Since you have finished so many courses i wonder: whenever you've finished a tree. Are you able to read articles/ news sites in that language fluently or do you still struggle with some things?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rarcher2010
rarcher2010
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I have a question, I completed the Portuguese tree some time ago and I can carry on a conversation in Portuguese, as well as read and write, but I see that your level is 25. How is that? Is this because you are translating? Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fischerfs
fischerfs
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Wow, you're a language learning god haha

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FOREIGNER123

You make it seem so easy

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1213eli

It takes around a year to get to level 25 from what I've heard, but it is the immersion that really helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lilypaddy
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I am learning German for an exchange program, reviewing Italian to brush up on my first language, and learning French for fun (and I got tired of Spanish BEING FORCED TO take it for five years in school!). I am most focused on German, but I have been going since September and I'm STILL just level 8 in German, 10 in Italian and 3 in French (I think). I wish I had more time to practice, but... school, karate, life... just no time! sighs self-pityingly :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danidanger101

I feel your pain. Except for the karate bit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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Three months and a day or two on about level eleven I guess. But am trying to keep my skill bars full now and I definitely received the easiest of questions. Anyway, completing the tree is not significant. I am still a complete novice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealDaveRuby
TheRealDaveRuby
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I remember completing the Spanish and feeling immense joy. But, at the same time I still couldn't understand everything I would here in the Spanish television. I think duolingo gets you at a B1 level in the language of your choosing. It is only a stepping stone to a neverending journey.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harjinder123

Thats really cool.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eb00kie
Eb00kie
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Danish at level 12 in 3 months and two weeks (mid July to 29.10), starting as a complete beginner.

I finished Italian, starting as a beginner, in 4 months and a half give or take. Nonetheless, Romanian and Italian are very similar, so that was a point in my favour.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trillions1

Have you retained it? You say 2010, and today is May 19 2015. Also when you do like languages do you still retain them without mixing them up? I'm nearly finished with DuoLingo Spanish(on my cell phone) and I'm not sure if I want to start French for fear of messing up my Spanish. I'm doing German next because of it but I will still have that worry about doing French too after. What's your experience with so many?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnSmyth

YAY! I can finally help someone. I am a multi-language learner and have had to research into this subject. As it pertains to romance languages, Specifically romance languages, it is always best to have a very firm grasp of any one romance language before endeavoring into another. The reason being that it will act as a basis for learning the others. For instance, I am a French major at university. I specifically chose French because it is one of the least similar. Italian, Spanish, and portugese are incredibly difficult not to confuse when Spanish is your base, and Romanian is very different from all of them as it is the closest to Latin due to its' distance from the other countries. So finally arriving at my point, your best bet is to strengthen your spanish to good degree, learn a non- romance language (German is a perfect idea), and then learn French or Romanian. After one of those you can switch to Italian or Portuguese. My non-romance is Japanese, which I learned before French.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danidanger101

You know Romanian?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eb00kie
Eb00kie
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Maternal language

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rok.sraka
rok.sraka
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Really? I'm level 11 in Danish at the moment, after about a month of learning, and I'm still at about 40%. But I do like to practice a lot, instead of progressing with the tree as fast a possible. Understanding the audio samples is by far the hardest for me...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanSurf
DanSurf
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Of course the audio is the hardest. It's DANISH!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missdjfrankiem

I'm an american but also a fluent spanish speaker (parents are from Latin America), and have completed both Portuguese and Italian trees. I started as an english speaker learning portuguese about 2 years ago (Sept 2013) and finished the tree in less 6 months, then when duolingo updated and provided an option to learn as a spanish speaker i did the whole tree over again- much faster this time.

I was very thorough though, literally hand writing down all the regular verb conjugations for all the tenses out in spanish- and then their portuguese equivalents next to them because it helped me memorize everything to see how they corresponded with each other (it's amazing how similar verb endings are for each of the tenses), also I googled and looked up concepts that i didn't understand, and specific grammar rules that weren't explained in duolingo, as well as articles comparing portuguese to spanish, explaining the grammatical differences and common errors that a spanish speaker learning portuguese might make. I probably could have gone through the tree faster just dong the exercises but i wanted to understand why certain things were structured in a certain way, and every time i logged in i made sure all my previous exercises were gold before learning a new skill.

When the Italian for Spanish speakers option came out (about a year ago) I did the Italian course in about the same amount of time using the same methods- writing out all verb conjugations (this time comparing, spanish, portuguese and italian), looking up rules etc.

In both cases i've found that i've reached a fairly high level of proficiency in both languages, but i have to emphasize that my prior knowledge of another romance language was extremely useful as there a lot of grammatical and structural similarities, so my results probably would not be typical of someone who has no other language experience.

If you are an english speaker who has a significant background in spanish (you've lived in another, country, achieved fluency somehow) and you want to learn either portuguese, italian, or french- I'd highly recommend doing those trees as a spanish speaker because it will help you understand everything much better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealDaveRuby
TheRealDaveRuby
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That is exactly what I am doing now. Not only does it help you learn the language but, it helps strengthen your Spanish. A lingot for your advice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SWEENBEAN58

What is your level of fluency after completing the tree. Are you able to speak fluently with Natives of other languages. I am just curious

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missdjfrankiem

when my trees were all gold... they said i was about between 55-60% fluent. I can pretty much carry on conversations with portuguese speakers, certain accents are a bit more difficult for me to understand than others, but i've had speakers from Portugual tell me that my accent and pronunciation sounds like a brazilian's (i was expecting to hear i sound like gringo). I haven't really had the chance to practice italian as much with native speakers unfortunately as there aren't as many of those where I am. But i can understand the little bit i see on youtube vids, and movies relatively well.

I also definitely recommend movies, youtube, podcasts, etc anything where you can hear native speakers talking

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariano_Bentley

Thanks for the amazing advice! I'm actually in the same position you were and it will make it easier for me learning from Spanish then.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MnBY
MnBY
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It depends, but i try to know perfectly the material before moving on, so it takes longer. But, I think at least one or two exercises a day and you'll make it in less than a year/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salarmiri

I think it depends on how much time does someone spend daily or how often someone take a lesson. It's about 4 months that I'm a duolingo user and I'm level 7 in French . but with some more time I would probably end it in a month. with a particular time daily , I think 5-6 months would be enough

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scuba_Bruce

131 days (4 months, 10 days). Level 15. Spanish. 30-60 minutes a day.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PoonTony
PoonTony
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I finished my Italian tree at level 13. I completed these 399 lessons in 808 days (around 27 months) with a 101 day streak.

Had to really commit to finishing it at the end.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingPenguin
LingPenguin
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It took me around 6 months (Though for two of them near the start I was extremely busy and only did a quick "Strengthen weakest words" each day to keep my streak) to finish my Spanish tree, and I was at level 14, almost at level 15. If I truly focused on learning that language and made it my number 1 priority, I could probably finish the whole tree in a month.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/500xpPerDay
500xpPerDay
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I just the Spanish tree from scratch in 17 days. I spent around 5 hours per day on Duo and learned about 160 words per day. Because I go to Spain very soon, I was kind of in a hurry ;)

Now let's keep practicing!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaPou

I took the Spanish placement test this morning and spent about an hour doing exercises this evening and finished the tree. It was totally unexpected, I didn't realize it was the end of the tree at all. I'm kind of bummed. I was really enjoying it and a deffinitely don't speak Spanish (I took 2 yrs in high school ten years ago, practiced a bit while working in restaurants but no real immersion)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whodathunkitz

I'm almost embarrassed to say this. I have no L2 beyond basic Cebuano, basic Esperanto. I used test out a lot. Used test out a few times twice. Once 3 times. I half-heartedly did 2 months of Spanish nearly 2 years ago. Mostly on Memrise. I was on level one duolingo Spanish on Monday evening. I must have started it some time ago then left it. I finished today Saturday morning less than 5 days later. Mostly golden, maybe 5 not. Cebuano has around 2000 Spanish words. Esperanto introduced me to different grammar. 8 weeks total time in Spain over 20 plus years.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whodathunkitz

Am level 11 Spanish and 13 for Esperanto. I didn't test out on Esperanto as far as I remember. Two weeks for Esperanto but much harder working. I have never successfully learnt a language. With duolingo, Memrise, YouTube and research into how I learn best, techniques etc it's completely different. But I still don't speak a language. I do have the confidence to start aiming higher now though and i believe I can learn a language. I thought it was beyond me!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whodathunkitz

I'd also recommend Esperanto. In Uk, various courses. Well worth considering especially if you were never taught grammar terms at school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whodathunkitz

Just for record 10 percent fluency according to duolingo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roberto_de1
roberto_de1
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I finished the Duo Spanish the Tree at level 12. It took awhile to get to level 25.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goran519

43 days on track level 12/13 loving it. Hopefully it will stay in my mind :) Full tree at full bars at all times.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wilkinsnick18
wilkinsnick18
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It took me a year or so and I finished at level 13 (just shy of 14) with finish the Italian course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patty835786

I am a complete beginner in french and level six in 4 days, about 30-45 minutes per day

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannah959717

took me 5 weeks to complete Swedish course at lvl 11 doing 5-20 lessons every day :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArinaR2
ArinaR2
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I started to learn French and German approximately 2 weeks ago from the beginning. Now I have Level 8 in French and Level 7 in German.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roberto_de1
roberto_de1
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I finished the Spanish Tree in about two months at level 14.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/princesslrosy

I barely have time andmi ussayy take about thirty minutes a day so immreally be hind

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PJCSantos

Lahure, your dedication is impressive! Espero que por esta altura consigas ler esta frase sem qualquer problema :P E já agora, será que podias partilhar quantas palavras tem o curso de alemão aqui no Duolingo? I'm doing it right now and I'm curious about this. Cheers!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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Para PJCSantos. Sim posso entender a frase facilmente. Mas infelizmente não me lembro o curso de alemão muito bem, infelizmente.

Seu inglês é excelente!

2 years ago

[deactivated user]

    about forty days for spanish

    EditDelete2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ImFizzle

    I have been wanting to work on Swedish for a while, I'm really glad I finally am.

    2 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      Good for you!

      EditDelete2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/gollon11

      Hey I am currently learning french and was just wondering if anyone knew supplemental ways to learn. Duolingo does a fantastic job but I have heard it doesn't get you all the way there. Thanks!

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/missdjfrankiem

      I'd say just use the google and look up stuff online. There are a bunch of online resources for language learning that can explain the grammar, structure, rules that aren't readily available within Duolingo itself. that's what i did for portuguese and Italian, and have been doing for Catalan. If i didn't understand a verb tense, then I'd just type in google example: "Portuguese subjunctive rules" and tons of stuff would come up. You can use the duolingo categories in the trees as guides, even wikipedia has some pretty useful information. Good luck :)

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/BlackPanther909

      I went through all of the French lessons and categories in less than two months, mind you I had prior knowledge (about 11% fluency when I started according to duolingo). Because of the prior knowledge I was able to test out of many categories successfully Now I'm at level 12 and 47% fluency. A ways to go. The real question is when I reach 100% will i actually be able to say anything I need to say flawlessly.

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Denise322109

      I achieved Master Level in Spanish in under a week. I was fluent 45 years ago, but was amazed at how quickly all the grammar came back thanks to Duolingo. I took the pre-test, and was told the first time that I didn't test out of anything. But even that test reminded me of things I'd forgotten, so I immediately took it again and tested into upper basics. Granted, I spent nearly every waking hour outside of work doing it for six days, but I was working on Greek simultaneously. This is fantastic as a refresher course.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/TrowerHous

      It took me 15 days to complete the whole tree and make everything golden in french. I did not even realize until I had completed the entire tree that there was any difference between gold and the other colors ... this is day 16 and the dashboard says that I'm 41% fluent and at level 14. I came here because I am having trouble figuring out what to do next.

      I appear to have moved very rapidly through the course. I am wondering if that is because something has changed in duolingo since the older comments were put here or if I have some peculiar advantage. I have been recovering from some injuries which I think came from statin drugs. Is it possible that a nervous system on the mend is able to learn languages more quickly?

      I am a computer software guy, know a fair number of programming languages, and I live in Canada. Even though I did not know french prior to trying Duolingo, it swirls about us here because it is an official language. I also have a large English vocabulary so ...

      I did most of my work on an Android tablet. I did a little bit on the web and a little bit on my iPhone. It seems to me that the Android tablet is more forgiving and allows you to move more quickly. Certainly, duolingo is different on the different platforms.

      I don't know if it made any difference but I got bored towards the end and bought everything you were able to buy in the shop.

      If somebody from duolingo is reading this: it is weird being in this situation. I was really enjoying this and then it just ended. I realize that things will degrade back from gold as they have all along. However as of now the entire tree is gold and the application gives me no indication of what I should do next.

      I am a pretty aggressive self learner and I spent more than a little time at this. However it seems to me that a pretty bright person who really hammers at it hard would be able to get to where I am in about 7 days. Maybe you should restructure to have silver/gold/platinum/diamond levels or something.

      Anybody who is reading this and making slower progress don't get discouraged. I had a variety of advantages and my grasp of French is weak at best. My skill degrades rapidly on duolingo and in real life as well. As somebody else has mentioned here, it is likely that slower progress is more permanent progress.

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/856pm

      I don't know. I started duo a few years ago. While I don't really do much here any more, I do speak french every day outside duo, so I'm probably okayish. I'm waiting for the hungarian course

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/JDShadrickReed

      I am on adjectives in Romanian today I am going to see how far I can get with NO testing out.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/DylanAJR
      DylanAJR
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      I also took 3 months and 1 week in order to complete the Spanish tree. But to complete the bonus skills I used 9 months, 3 weeks, and 2 days as I never really did the bonus skills until then.

      1 year ago
      Learn a language in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

      Learn a language in just 5 minutes a day. For free.