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https://www.duolingo.com/Antonio_Sou

'... till sin stora lättnad slapp han något straff.' - Help!

Hello, hope you can help me here. I'm having trouble understanding the meaning of 'slapp' in this phrase. I'm not even sure what verb that's meant to be. Why not 'fick'? Do Swedish people 'get' punishments? Is this idiomatic?

Thank you!

2 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MartenSanden
MartenSanden
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The verb is "att slippa" = roughly: to get out of, to be excused from.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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Regarding the other question, in Swedish you can say att få sitt straff, analogously with "to get one's punishment" in English. But slapp in this sentence doesn't mean that, quite the opposite, as others have said.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skalpadda

To receive or be given one's punishment work quite well as direct translations in English as well.

I've never reflected over how English doesn't have an exact equivalent of slippa. Perhaps someone better at etymology can draw a more clear line, but I'm guessing it's related to släppa (release, let go) and given its use in slippa undan I suppose the best direct translation would be escape.

So, word for word literal translation: ...to his great relief escaped he any punishment.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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"Slippa" is cognate to "slip" in English, where you can see a certain semantic connection still, but I don't think "escape" is the best translation - that implies getting out of something unlawfully, against the rules of society. "Slippa" means getting out of something that you don't wan't to do - it doesn't say anything about the attitude of the third party that lets you get out of it. I think "get out of" is a better translation - it conveys the same kind of relief as "slippa".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skalpadda

>I don't think "escape" is the best translation - that implies getting out of something unlawfully, against the rules of society.

Not sure I agree with that at all; you can escape unharmed from an accident, a breath of air can escape your lungs and a space rocket can achieve escape velocity.

Considering the constructions undslippa/slippa undan you can get to translations like:

A sigh escaped her lips. - En suck undslapp hennes läppar.

Certainly there are contexts where a direct translation would be inappropriate, but in this context I can't think of an English word that more exactly matches the meaning.

2 years ago