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https://www.duolingo.com/BellaLibellula

Rhymes for Learning a Language

Aquage posted this in Spanish and I thought it would be interesting to hear others. Are there any rhymes you were taught to learn something in another language? Either a rule or grammar, whatever it may be.

Aquage posted for Spanish (I hope they don't mind a copy paste :) ): This and these both have 't's, that and those don't

4 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BellaLibellula

First one that comes to mind for my native English is: I before E, except after C.

But this rule is overruled all the time... go English! :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/856pm

My neighbor told me to weigh his sleigh while his horse said "neigh." Strange orthography, is it not?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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That's only the first half of the saying. The full phrase is: I before E, except after C or when sounding like "ay" as in "neighbor" or "weigh". And weird is just weird.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desi.bomb

Nice topic idea! I can't recall exactly, there's one for English something like "when two vowels go for a walk, the first is the one to talk" (e.g. in "boat", "o" and "a" go for a walk but only the "o" sound is heard).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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When two vowels go a walking, the first one does the talking.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BellaLibellula

I've never heard that before, but that's a good one! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zach1337

Something that I just recently learned for German.

When i and e go walking, the 2nd letter does the talking. So, when i and e are together like this: ie and this: ei the second letter is the sound that is produced (Going by English sounds).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BellaLibellula

I just remembered another one for English, "When in doubt, sound it out." I assume this is because a majority of our spellings are spelled phonetically? No idea if that's true but nonetheless!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porquepuedo
porquepuedo
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Ironic because doubt is a completely un-phonetic word :P Just like... subtle, would, should, walk, could, know etc...

4 years ago