1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Polish
  4. >
  5. "My son has to do eight exerc…

"My son has to do eight exercises."

Translation:Mój syn musi zrobić osiem ćwiczeń.

February 9, 2016

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stramner

Why is ćwiczeń in genitive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emwue

Polish grammar:

"When a numeral modifies a noun, the numeral takes the expected case, but the noun may not; also the gender and number of the resulting noun phrase may not correspond to that of the noun. The following rules apply:

  • The numeral jeden (1) behaves as an ordinary adjective, and no special rules apply. It can even be used in the plural, for example to mean "some" (and not others), or to mean "one" with pluralia tantum, e.g. jedne drzwi "one door" (drzwi has no singular).
  • After the numerals dwa, trzy, cztery (2, 3, 4), and compound numbers ending with them (22, 23, 24, etc. but not 12, 13, or 14, which take -naście as a suffix and are thus not compound numbers at all), the noun is plural and takes the same case as the numeral, and the resulting noun phrase is plural (e.g. 4 koty stały, "4 cats stood").
  • With other numbers (5, 6, etc., 20, 21, 25, etc.), if the numeral is nominative or accusative, the noun takes the genitive plural form, and the resulting noun phrase is neuter singular (e.g. 5 kotów stało, "5 cats stood").
  • With the masculine personal plural forms of numbers (as given in the morphology article section), the rule given above – that if the numeral is nominative or accusative the noun is genitive plural, and the resulting phrase is neuter singular – applies to all numbers other than 1 (as in trzech mężczyzn przyszło, "three men came"), unless the alternative nominative forms dwaj, trzej, czterej (for 2, 3, 4) are used (these take nominative nouns and form a masculine plural phrase).
  • If the numeral is in the genitive, dative, instrumental or locative, the noun takes the same case as the numeral (except sometimes in the case of numbers that end with the nouns for 1000 and higher quantities, which often take a genitive noun regardless)."

  • „Musi zrobić dwa ćwiczenia” but:

  • „Musi zrobić osiem ćwiczeń”

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stramner

Thanks makes sense, it's like Slovak language. Sometimes it's just hard to realize the connections since I have to translate everything through English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollyfer

Isn't Slovak as easily interchangeable in terms of lexical vocabulary and partially in grammar with Polish as it is with Czech? With Czech, the relation is of course obvious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I once listened to a conversation between a Czech guy and a Slovak guy and I understood nothing ;) Although I wasn't trying very hard, they were just talking next to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollyfer

Nothing? This is surprising, although especially the endings in Czech verbs in the nominative often sound as if leaning towards German, with all the open “e”s they might, in colloquial speech, utter as either an [ə] or [ɐ] (inverted a, in case it shouldn't show), although the latter seems to be almost exclusively German. And in the TTS, the endings are expressed apparently clear and verbatim. Still, for the rest, I thought you would effortlessly understand a little bit. In the end, we speak of Western slavic languages as a branch, an in-group, different from Southern Slavic and Eastern Slavic languages (or are those in the East collectively referred to their Russian patriarch?). :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelbentForleder

So what's the difference between 'ćwiczenie' and 'zadanie'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

depends on context. In schoolbooks they mean the same, but ćwiczenie is more "practice what you already know", while "zadanie" can be also "do something new"

Zadanie domowe at school means homework.

In less school related context ćwiczenie usually means phisical exercise. Ćwiczyć is a verb that means excercise and sometimes practice (speaking, playing an instrument) and ćwiczenie can be a noun form (practicing, excercising )

Zadanie in less school realated context means task, job, purpose, assignment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelbentForleder

Thanks. So, shouldn't Duo accept "Mój syn musi zrobić osiem zadań.' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

It is correct. You should report it. While officially out of beta there are still many translations missing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiktorka234

I am really confused with the verbs here. Why is it "zrobić" but not "robić?" Are there certain rules I should follow when it comes to using perfective and imperfective verbs in sentences?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Actually I added "robić" because it is also possible. "Zrobić" is more probable though. It seems more reasonable that your son has to do eight exercises now, or soon, so the focus will be on doing them to the end. But it's also possible that he has to do them regularly, like "eight exercises per week", and this will be "robić".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simone76

Napisałem: "Mój syn ma do zrobienia osiem ćwiczeń.". To wręcz dosłowne tłumaczenie, ale po polsku tak też mówimy i "musi zrobić" jest tożsame z "ma do zrobienia"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Jasne, dodałem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrgrv

Is it possible to use"mój syn ma robić ..." to say 'he has to do ...' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simone76

Tak, oczywiście że tak można powiedzieć.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrgrv

Dziękuję za odpowiedź. Myślałem że gdzieś coś takiego czytałem ... ale nie byłem pewien.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simone76

Takie tłumaczenie było chyba nawet gdzieś na Duo. Swoją drogą zdania "Masz to zrobić!" i "You have to do it!" używają czasownika "mieć", "to have" w nie dosłownym znaczeniu "musieć" a nie dosłownym "posiadać coś" ;) Takie znaczenie "(ty) masz" (you have to) podobne do angielskiego w tym przypadku, raczej jest rzadkie, gdy teraz na to zwróciłem uwagę.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

OK, dodałem "ma", ale "zrobić" jest raczej bardziej prawdopodobne niż "robić".

OK, I added "ma", but "zrobić" is rather more probable than "robić".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simone76

To prawda - "He has to do it" będzie oznaczało konieczność, przymus zrobienia czegoś, dokonania, wykonania i zakończenia czynności, a nie jej ciągłego kontynuowania, robienia. Zatem poprawnie jest tutaj "zrobić", a nie "robić".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Nie powiem, żeby "robić" było niepoprawne, w odpowiednim kontekście może chodzić, np. może rozmawiamy o tym, ile pracy domowej dziennie/tygodniowo mają nasze dzieci, i wtedy to 'robić' faktycznie oznacza, że mój syn musi robić osiem zadań każdego dnia. Ale ogólnie jest to mniej prawdopodobne.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simone76

Mój powyższy komentarz dotyczył tego konkretnego zdania. Nie chodzi tu o prawdopodobieństwo, tylko o sens w tym konkretnie omawianym przypadku.

Learn Polish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.