1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "Yo gasto mucho."

"Yo gasto mucho."

Translation:I spend too much.

January 16, 2013

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyleb3383

Wouldn't "too much" be "demasiado"? To me, "I spend much" and "I spend too much" are very different meanings...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis

In this case, "Yo gasto mucho" can mean both "too much" and "a lot".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skully

And how about "I spend much" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C.lp

Yep, I wonder why this is not excepted here. I mean, in other tasks "much" and "a lot" are interchangeable...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khalil3x6

Great icon! Yodalingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cogbon

more like: "Yodalingo, he is"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaK0

Lol! He is Yodalingo! haha :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baramander

They are not interchangeable in this case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baramander

No. I spend much is just not good English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Proprietous

Does "gastar" indicate wastefulness then? I have heard it used that way in conversational spanish but I'm not sure it's "proper."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leslie_Duo

According to Google Translate, the top 3 definitions for <<gastar>> are: 1. to spend, 2. to expend, and 3. to waste. I always thought it just meant "to spend," so this is useful for me too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baramander

That's interesting. Spend with waste implied by another synonym.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loonce

just idiomatic, then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elissaf1

The root of gastar is the Latin vastare, the same root of "vast" and "waste" in English. (Idiomatic implies that the connotation wouldn't be evident given the literal meaning.) In this case, the connotation is apparently available.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paribapabou

Spending "a lot" indicates that you still have a positive balance left. Spending "too much" (like the government") is an indication that you have run into the red. How deep depends on "too much". My preference is "gastar mucho y no demasiado"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paribapabou

Luis They cannot be both: If you are close to maxing out your credit cards you are spending a lot; if you have already maxed out your cards, you have spent too much. Thus, you can spend a lot, and still not too much. In the final analysis, just stick to cash, and only use your a card in an emergency, since there are contemplations in the air to do away with the Consumer Financial Bureau Bureau, which compelled banks to make interest rates more manageable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paribapabou

> Luis ¿Por qué? You can spend "too much", because you actually cannot afford to spend that much; on the other hand you can spend a lot on something/somebody that is not worth it, even though you can afford to make the expenditure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaMac4

I agree demasiado should be too much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baramander

That is the definition of demasiado


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leslie_Duo

I agree, "yo gasto mucho" seems more like "I spend a lot" than " I spend too much," which would be "yo gasto demasiado."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

Gastar demasiado = overspend


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Casiquire

And that's what "too much" means to me. So "mucho" should just be "a lot" or "much".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stu9ba

I put "I spend lots" which was the natural way to translate it in my opinion, but got marked wrong! Is that an inaccurate translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Esn024

I think "I spend lots" should be accurate...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/porkrind94

If you say that it means to spend a lot then to spend much is correct also. This either needs to be moved to an idiomatic section or corrected to accept words that are universally accepted to mean the same thing. If duo lingo doesn't the time to fix these I would be have to help them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

rogercchristie is right. "I spend much" leaves a dangling adjective - it wants something to modify, like "money" or "time" or "good will". Even then, it's kind of peculiar, because most people would say "a lot of" instead of much.

"much [something] is often reserved for more formal or dramatic statements: "Much effort was expended in construction the pyramids." UNLESS the phrase is "much of" - I spent much of my time/a lot of my time - no difference, really.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WChorneau

It has been 2 years since people complained about "I spend much" not being accepted and it still is not corrected. I also get no responses when I try to contact support. What experiences are others having? does anyone even read the comments?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat281994

I came back to this question because later in this lesson "El coche vale mucho" is translated as 'the car costs much' yet in this case, 'I spend much' is incorrect. To me if 'I spend much' is incorrect in this case, then 'the car costs much' should be incorrect as well. I am confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KazzLewsader

Why wouldn't this be, "I spend a lot"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nc.chelle

Generally speaking, "much" is only used for questions and negative statements. "A lot" is used for positive statements.

"Do you spend much?" "I don't spend much?" BUT "I spend a lot".

I say generally because English loves nothing more than exceptions. In formal speech, one uses much in positive statements. However, in formal speech you would follow much with a noun and, more likely than not, a prepositional phrase clarifying precisely on what you spend the money.

"I spend much money (on books)."

(NOTE: In positive statements with so, as, or too, we use much instead of a lot or lots.)

Here are some links:

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/quantifiers/much-many-a-lot-of-lots-of-quantifiers

https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/vocabulary/much-many

http://www.grammar.cl/Notes/Much_Many_Lot_Few.htm

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eliskipp

"I use too much" is incorrect. Por que?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis

Although this is close, I would say "gasto" is really "spend" and not "use".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannahSp7v

can it be "i spend a lot."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mercyalip

why 'i spend so much' not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bdawsn

even though "too much" sounds better than "much", I would not try it since I have been zinged in the past for not being word-for-word enough.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillSmith577965

Yes I know. That is why we are getting divorced... Como se dice "divorced"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shemiii

[Insert money joke here]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThUit

how do i translate "i spend much"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ParkHan

Too much is exactly same as mucho? Just much can be same as mucho.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jumcbee

Hmmm. I spend much is awkward, but seems correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boletg

I answered " I spend much," and it was marked wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheChosen0ne

It would not let me say " I spend much". Why is this?????????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chloequatre

When you place the cursor over mucho - the word is defined as much, very much, or very. I agree "I spend much" sounds awkward while "I spend a lot" sounds better. Does placing mucho after gasto change the translation of mucho to "too much"? Wouldn't it make sense for DL to list the correct translation when the cursor over the words? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TamsinHolm

I was confusing the verb "Gastar" (to spend) with "Ganar" (to win/earn)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AR_Elsherbiny

Feels like me right now; spending a lot during my vacation in Italy :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charles218008

In the past i've not been marked incorrect for omitting "yo" Why is "Gasto mucho" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Super_Duo_Lingo

I think that 'mucho' and 'demasiado' are the source of ambiguity. I am not sure that in the context of 'gastar', 'mucho' means 'too much', but not just 'much' or 'a lot'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barry130297

I am trying an experiment.

Up to this point in my Duolingo journey (Much Italian and some Spanish) when I submitted reports on learning items which I thought had problems (only happened about four times) I did not get feedback. I am thinking that is because I was not yet "verified". I am now verified and just now submitted a report on an item in "Present". The item solicits a translation of, "Yo gasto mucho" to which I responded, "I spend much." This was scored as wrong with the desired translation as, "I spend too much".

I am waiting now to see if I get a response to my report which would indicate that a learner needs to be verified to get the responses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nc.chelle

That may be the case now that verification has started; however, I have received confirmation about reports I submitted the entire time I have been with Duolingo (some 3 years perhaps). I've never gotten any kind of response except in cases where they have accepted my correction. I don't always get them in that case either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KazzLewsader

I have encountered the same. I believe you are notified if yours happens to be the report that was read by DL. I don't think they notify everyone who reports.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTenespanol

Marked incorrect for "I spend much". Reported for correction, it is a direct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kwinchi

wouldn't " i waste too much " be correct , it appears to have the same roots as " gaspiller" in french

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.