https://www.duolingo.com/woodpeckerr

I feel myself bad. And what examples of interesting incidents you know? :)

I just learn English and heard funny story about this phrase :) and in Russian it looks absolutely correct "Я чувствую себя плохо" (возможно я заболел), but if I'll translate it word to word... that is not what your boss need to hear from you :)

Do you have any other examples? Давайте расслабимся и посмеемся.

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheCenterZone

I was just learning English and head a funny story about this phrase.*

If I translate it word for word that is not what your boss needs to hear from you.*

I hope this helps:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EavanM

You've got a typo yourself, there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woodpeckerr

thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csharpmajor
csharpmajor
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 4
  • 4
  • 8

I find it interesting that teaching something works the opposite way in English and Russian. In Russian you teach someone to something but in English you teach something to someone.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woodpeckerr

interesting observation :) not sure if I know English so good to decide, but if consider "teach" (преподавать, учить кого-то) like action that dong teacher during his work, in Russian it's also can be "something to someone", like: "Я преподаю (что?) русский язык на Дуолинго" - "I teach (what?) russian language on Duolingo".

Haha :) now I remember another word, that may sounds for you like "dead" in russian "дед" (grandfather) , like "Мой дед очень веселый" - "My grandfather is so funny" :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/draquila

How about "I taught my brother to drive?" Compare that to "I taught driving to my brother" and it's definitely more natural-sounding.

"I taught Russian to my sister" and "I taught my sister Russian" sound almost equal to me, although I'd prefer the latter. In English we can usually put the dative (without "to," unless you're writing poetry) after the verb and before the object.

Are the cases switched in Russian?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csharpmajor
csharpmajor
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 4
  • 4
  • 8

I would interpret "I taught my sister Russian" as having "sister" as the indirect object, like "I gave my sister the ball". In Russian it's more like "I taught my sister (direct object) TO Russian", as if you were leading her.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/draquila

Ah, okay, so the cases are switched then.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

So, does "Я чувствую себя плохо" mean something like "I don't feel so good" or "I feel bad"? I'm a little confused still. My Russian isn't even good enough to read most of Винни-Пух. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woodpeckerr

Я чувствую себя плохо - I feel bad . Я чувствую себя не очень хорошо - I don't feel so good

just when some people translate "Я чувствую себя ..." word for word, they say "I feel myself ..." in russian that is correct, using "ceбя" (myself)

2 years ago
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.