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"Nosotras vamos a terminar de comer."

Translation:We are going to finish eating.

5 years ago

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/quehorason

.....stop eating ?????

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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I think that stop eating is a wrong translation. Stop indicates ending a task in the middle, or an interruption, while finish has more of a feeling of a completed task.
Jane stopped eating when the door bell rang
Jane finished eating when the door bell rang
This first statement you get the feeling that she was in the middle of eating, and then had to answer the door, while in the second sentence, it seems like she just completed her mean when the door bell range.
Subtle difference, but it is there.
For stop eating, you should use parar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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There may be a regional difference here. I would say that we finished eating was the act of consuming the remaining food; that is completing the meal rather than the end of the meal.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smallquanni
smallquanni
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I use "stop" and fail

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.Uijttewaal
M.Uijttewaal
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me too...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronTovo

report it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickAyr2

Yep, stop eating seems to me the most normal translation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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You can stop before you finish. Although they are sometimes used loosely in English, they do have different meanings. Stop is parar in Spanish. Terminar is to finish.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenoraFlood

Why "Terminar DE comer" here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

The phrase for finishing doing an action is "terminar de + infinitive," so you have "terminar de comer."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/averrryyyyyy

There seem to be a few verbs that have to be "verb + de" how do you know which of these verbs require the "de"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Google "Spanish verb + de".
I think there are more than a few. The first reference I found says:
"In Spanish, many verbs must be followed by a preposition, which may or may not correspond to the preposition (if any) used in English."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

its' the little words...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConfusedSquid

Gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hubbim9

could I say 'terminar comiendo'? (finish eating)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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In this sense not really. Terminar + de +infinitive is the way to express finishing an activity. Terminar comiendo would actually mean end up eating. Here is a linkhttp://spanish.about.com/od/verbs-q-t/a/terminar.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hubbim9

gracias por su ayuda

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie7511

thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaroberts24

That really sounds like nosotros in the recording.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1

We are not nearly so finicky (usually) in English. Stop eating should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cousinsj

Isn't "Stop eating" pretty much the same as "finish eating"?!?!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola CousinsJ: No. "stop" and "finish" or not the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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not quite...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ianinjite02

If you "stop" doing something, you dont necessarily complete it first. If you "finish", you have completed. Therefore, if someone had to "stop eating", they probably dont get to finish the food.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gbarnga

it's stop eating...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LSgatita

We are going to stop eating

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crhatt

In American English, we say "stop" eating, not "finish" eating.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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We say both. You can see my comment above, but I will give another example here.
"Hey mom, can you help me with my homework?" "Sure, let me finish eating first."
This indicates that the meal will me complete, and then the help will be given. If the response was, "Sure, let me stop eating first", it really doesn't make any sense outside the chance that the mother has a mouth full of food she wants to swallow before helping.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crhatt

Fine, we use both, so both answers should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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Right, but we use different words for both, and the same is true in Spanish.
If you want the sentence to read, 'stop' in English you would use the Spanish word, 'parar' or probably more likely 'dejar de'.
If you want the sentence to read 'finish' in English you would use the Spanish word 'terminar' or 'acabar'.
The words are not equal, and therefore it is my opinion that both should not be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uppergardiner
uppergardiner
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Same in Ireland!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissiKat75

Could I say 'nos vamos a terminar de comer' and be correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

If you were trying to say "We are going to stop eating ourselves" yes, that would be correct. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heikheik

Wouldn't that rather be "We're going to finish ourselves eating"? As the "nos" refers to the word "terminar" in this sentence. In fact, "comerse" means "to eat up". So "Vamos a comernos" should basically have the same meaning. The "terminar" wouldn't make sense anymore, though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"We're going to finish ourselves eating" would not be used in English. (Unless, that is, you are Mr Creosote!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JollyWolf

Question to the natives:

In the previous lesson, acabar de was used in place of terminar de. Which is more common and is there any real difference?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Denise7126

ellas van a considerar el documento

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiamLionUK

Yo voy a continuar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrayjedi

...Right after this double bacon cheeseburger, large fry, and pepsi. And maybe not even then. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maa249530
Maa249530
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Said no one on star trek ever.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diana888898
Diana888898
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Thanks for all the comments. I was puzzled but I think I've got it now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ng0918

Terminar=terminate=stop??? Stop seems a whole lot closer to terminate than "finish"... Finish implies that you are coming to the end of something. Terminate means to stop something, regardless of how close to the end of it you are.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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It is dangerous to assume all the connotations and denotations of an English word exist in the Spanish cognate. Actually terminar means to finish or to end.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/terminar

I don't know if I see the English distinction quite the same as you do, but the meanings of words often change and develop over time and Spanish is on a different path at this point. This is why a good bilingual dictionary with example sentences is crucial.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sophie_Del

Nosotras should the feminine of we so why is the man voice saying that sentence?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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At least in the Spanish course there is no correlation between the gender of the speaker and the gender of the I or we in the sentence. The woman's voice was the original one so all the sentences were by a woman. When they added the man's voice, they didn't go back and re-record the sentences. They just ignored the issue. I guess you could consider the voices just narrators.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnChild

Stop and finish have same meaning in this context. Both should be accepted. The 'correct' meaning 'be done eating' given is more US than UK English I think.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Stop and finish actually do not mean the same thing in this context. You can stop eating before you finish eating. To be done eating, wherever it is used, sort of begs the question as to whether you finished just a bit, which may be why it was shown if you tried stop.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diana888898
Diana888898
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Be done eating? Definitely not UK English.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KimRiggins

I can't understand a word this lady says. I can understand the guy just fine.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan349172

"We will stop eating" should be accepted

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Duo used to want the phrasal future translated as the phrasal future and the simple future as the simple future. For the most part they seem to have abandoned that, but probably some exercises may not have caught up. I actually tend to stick with the original concept as it does make some sense, but if you report this sentence they will probably fix it eventually.

2 months ago