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https://www.duolingo.com/RG710

Help with Russian pronunciation?

RG710
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Okay, so what I notice in Russian is sometimes the letter O sounds like A in certain words,but in other words it sounds like O, why this happen and how to know when to pronounce O like A?

2 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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'О' is always (I think) pronounced as 'а' when unstressed; when stressed, it is pronounced as you would expect. If there are any exceptions to this then I haven't come across them yet. Unfortunately, there is no foolproof way to determine where the stress will fall in any given word, so one can only listen a lot.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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Usually it seems that "о" sounds like its name [о, "oh"] when stressed. In the syllable before a stressed syllable it sounds like "ah," and in syllables before the syllable preceding the stress it sounds more like "uh" (schwa]. As in "хорошо"--huh-rah-shoh. After the stress it sounds like "uh." But not everyone speaks this way. For some people there are less syllables that sound like "uh" and more that sound like "ah."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PavelAntropov
PavelAntropov
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Actually, unstressed 'o' sounds like 'a' only in Moscow, in other parts of Russia it sounds like something between 'a' and 'o', but more like 'a'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RG710
RG710
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Ok, Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

Generally, it's "oh" when stressed and "ah" elsewhere. This rule will work for basically all situations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RG710
RG710
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Do you know the way to know which part of the word is stress and unstressed?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PavelAntropov
PavelAntropov
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Haha, listen more Russian. You just have to feel it :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PavelAntropov
PavelAntropov
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My English isn't great, but I'll try to explain. We do it the way how it's easier for us to say, how it sounds better. Each part of the word have to sounds good and clearly. Making accents is an instrument that helps with it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

There are no rules to tell, and you just have to memorize the stress.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel
chirelchirel
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I really dislike it when people say there are no rules :D I find it so hard to believe. So, I'm currently trying to find them :) I'll promise to post them if I find them!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norrius
Norrius
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There are some patterns (for example, see Zaliznyak's classification for nouns), but they are assigned to words pretty much randomly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel
chirelchirel
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Yes, I analyzed that yesterday and (without knowing any actual Russian words) reduced the patterns to six (instead of the original 10). When I start building my vocabulary I'll be able to see if my classification works as a learning tool.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

If it does, chi, please do share. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

Slightly related, I recommend Forvo.com for pronounciation audio. :)

2 years ago