https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa

Two cool Spanish verbs

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I really love the "snappiness" of English - you can say soooo much in just a few syllables. However, sometimes Spanish has the edge. Take these three verbs for instance:

dificultar = to make (something) difficult

ultimar = to leave (something) until the last minute (gosh, what a mouthful!)

posibilitar = to make possible (imposibilitar = to make impossible)

There are a few more of these... but I can't remember them right now ;-)

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

Nice examples! Here`s one... empalagar = to be too sweet.

Here`s another... enmadrarse = to become too tied to one's mother

And, my favorite... estrenar = to wear for the first time

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VeeDrawStuff
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I never read/heard empalagar. Well if I heard it, I wouldn't recognize it but I like that word nonetheless. I did see enmadrarse as an insult. I learned estrenar a while back because it also means to debut or perform for the first time. It is often used when discussing a new music act.

I just did an image search for empalagar. I found this! I never saw the word on Duolingo. That makes sense because I learned new expressions and words in the French for Spanish, and Portuguese for Spanish courses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

"Empalagar" is a really common one.

"Empalagoso" and "empalagado" are related words:

Estoy empalagado (I've had too much sweet. I want no more)
El helado es empalagoso (The ice cream is way too sweet)

Great picture, by the way :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa
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Estrenar! Yes! I use that all the time, totally forgot about that one ;-)

Enmadrarse, lol! I'd not heard that... will be asking my friend after lunch whether it's used here in Spain ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chocolamina

It's because it is not typical in Spain! Is from some American country, probably Mexico.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonio2castillo
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hello trataré de explicarlo: es común y usado aquí en España normalmente. por ejemplo, lo dicen las mujeres respecto de sus maridos ( novios)..... está enmadrado.......¡que no sabe hacer nada sin su madre¡ que no ha dejado la protección de su madre......que hace todo lo que le dice su mama.....que todo lo que dice su mama le parece muy bien y siempre acertado....y........ claro que las comiditas de su mama son las mejores......etc. etc.

lo mismo si es una mujer la que está enmadrada. Aunque nos parece más ligero........porque un hombre no siente a su suegra como una competidora y las mujeres en esos casos sí.

CLARO me he referido a los adultos. Los niños también pueden están enmadrados. Aquí creo que no hay que explicarlo. saludos y gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chocolamina

Pues eso será entre los adultos, los más jóvenes ya no utilizamos esa palabra creo yo. O igual depende de la ciudad.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Enmadrarse? I hadn't heard that either. It sounds to me like "Mexican" Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet
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Yes it is

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boncey
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Fairly obvious ones but I like that all the meals have verbs too.

  • desayunar - to have breakfast
  • almorzar - to have lunch
  • merendar - to have an afternoon snack
  • cenar - to have dinner

These people are serious about their food! :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chocolamina

And that's in South America!

Cause in Spain we have even more! "Almorzar" is a morning snack between breakfast and lunch and we just use "comer" for lunch.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonio2castillo
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hello pues añade comer (la comida) es la mas copiosa o fuerte entre la una, una y media las tres o cuatro (todas p.m.) es vuestro lunch. En realidad almorzar aquí es por ejemplo entre 10 y once por la mañana -a.m.-......... también puede ser entre 9 y media y once y media, todo a. m.. pueder ser más fuerte todavía pero en general se compone de una cerveza o vino, un bocadillo, unas olivas etc en un plato y un café.

después de todo ello a las 2 p.m. la comida

saludos

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.R.Nogal
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This is nice:

Enamorar=To make someone fall in love.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
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Madrugar - to get up before dawn. Trasnochar. To stay up all night.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marnie3352

Procrastinate could be a good English translation for ultimar sense it also means that you are deliberately leaving something until the last minute.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chocolamina

This is wrong! In Spanish we say "procrastinar" for "procrastinate". "Ultimar" is more kind of "finishing the details and perfecting the work". It is actually "to finalize".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonio2castillo
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o.k.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marnie3352

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VeeDrawStuff
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Dificultar is one of those friendly words that I can discern the meaning quickly in context. Ultimar, I would not have guessed that definition. Yes, I think that verb is cool.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet
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Ultimar= hacer los últimos detalles de algo. Ej: Ellos están ultimando los procedimientos necesarios ., matar = Lo ultimaron a tiros.

3 years ago
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