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"Tra il dire e il fare c'è di mezzo il mare."

Translation:Easier said than done.

December 24, 2013

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btalbert

Is the literal translation of this something to the effect of "Between saying and doing there is the middle of the sea"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itastudent

I would say "Between saying and doing there is the sea in the middle" (hoping that makes sense to you in English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btalbert

Yes, that makes perfect sense, thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RishabhPal1

Thank you! That's very helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evren52

How "di mezzo il mare" translates to "sea in the middle" ? What is the function of di and why the word sea is at the end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlancheDB

Between the saying and the doing, there is half the sea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carosew

Why are they translating it to the English version rather than telling us what it actually says? The italian paints a great picture! And why not keep it culturally correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tiddman

I believe it is essentially slang, not meant to be interpreted literally. For example another common expression is "In quattro e quattr'otto", which literally translated means "in four and four eight", which doesn't really mean anything literally, but idiomatically means "quickly".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carosew

I'm sure it originated somewhere though. Fixed expressions don't come from nowhere! Maybe it's from drumming pattern or time signature?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_-clockwork.71

Um. Could someone please explain to me how this would translate to "easier said than done."? I'm a bit confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeLyons85

This is not a literal translation. It is similar to (but not exactly the same as) "There's many a slip twixt cup and lip." The literal translation is something like "Between word and deed there is half of the sea."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stronzia

(native Italian) your interpratation is right, Let me only correct your litteral translation: "Between word and deed there is a sea in the middle" (essere di mezzo = be in the middle, be median).
Thank you for sharing the english idiom: it's very usefull for me. Can I ask you what does "twixt" exactly mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewduo

Twixt is short for betwixt, which is itself an outdated word for between. I assumed it was Shakespeare (as usual), but it looks like it's older than that. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There's_many_a_slip_twixt_the_cup_and_the_lip


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeLyons85

Thanks for correcting my Italian. I am a beginner! Betwixt is an archaic form of between. Earliest reference I can find is in the 16th century. Twixt still survives in proverbs and sayings like this one.

The phrase "betwixt and between" means neither one thing nor the other".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skylight_Divine

I could use a Twix right now.. Haha. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrSunshine251

Thanks for that Divine, now I want one!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antonio243141

Thanks for litteral translation! I need it to memorize.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MABBY

Easier said than guessed.
What a mouthful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryBallan

Is it really wrong to say "there is a vast gulf between saying and doing" ?.Surely idioms should paint a picture, rather than give a literal translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juliefjw

words and deeds are an ocean apart (same idea but marked wrong)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurenConf

I hate that I used 30 lingots for this...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vito_170

Yes, but on the other hand what other uses are they worthy for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit215544

"Entre el decir y el hacer está en medio el mar." Is there a better way to put it in spanish. I am not sure if there is a similar spanish idiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ragazzo114658

In Spanish we use "Del dicho al hecho hay mucho trecho". Esentially the same as the Italian one but without the sea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexros83

There is a similar saying (dicho) in Spanish. "Del dicho al hecho hay mucho trecho". This means " From the saying to the fact there is a lot of space". The space in this case can be space of distance or space of time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lbail117

Does anybody else have trouble saying the whole thing in the few seconds the microphone is working? I feel like it is too fast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vito_170

The whole phrase is in regular speed, but it has been said in a strange movement: "fare c'è" is crazy fast!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kriska_kriska

There is no way to guess the English "easier said than done" from the Italian original


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewduo

Anyone reckon "actions speak louder than words" could fit this too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stronzia

there is little difference: in Italian we have the same idiom you wrote: "I fatti contano più delle parole", it is similar but not the same. If you talk about honest thing, but you never do that.. so you can say "actions speak louder than words". When you dream on, but you haven't resources enough for doing what you wish.. than you say "tra il dire e il fare c'è di mezzo il mare" it is more "soft" expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fede.On

easier said than done, there's many a slip twixt cup and lip


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ritrat

What about easier said than done ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdgarIsmae2

Come on how is this wrong? "Between saying and doing there is an ocean" these idioms do not translate super literally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NMedina3

"Entre el dicho y el hecho hay un largo trecho". Spanish version with rhyme, not literal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FloritaSDQ

What about: "There's many a slip twixt the cup and the lip." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vito_170

<<Tra il dire e il fare c'è di mezzo "e il".>> = (literally) <<Between the saying and the making there is "and the".>>.

The Italian music band "Elio e le storie tese" did put this version of the proverb in an old song of theirs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaikhosi

I'll believe it when I see it. That isn't so poetic though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeLyons85

Between word and deed there is half the sea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ocf781

Previous one about an arm and a leg i was marked wrong, so not sure why this was translated literally and my more common answer (a big difference rather than a sea) was marked wrong. Very inconsistent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veronica984712

Do Italians really say this???? So freaking long


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vito_170

Yes we do! "Long"?! but easier than making it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siroooo

اللي ع الشط شاطر


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveSimpson1993

It's sentences like this that completely puts me off learning! lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleAd712181

"Half of the sea" or "sea in the middle"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vito_170

SEA IN BETWEEN as above said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrinceChristoph

This does not translate to "Easier said than done", so it should not be on here... I have no idea what many of these words are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ged372057

I totally agree!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/omoragbonanett

how can italian people express themselves this beautifully?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gill328589

I was marked wrong for using the english idiom there's many a slip tween cup and lip, but right for easier said than done . I think this is a mistake by Duolingo.Idioms only have aproximate translations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john631799

Easier done than said! Whew.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesleyHenr

Not so easily said!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jefflemon

Sooooo long hard to pronounced

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