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Sk...ed?

Hi guys :) Do any of you live in Sweden, where you probably hear this daily, or even if you don't live in Sweden, Maybe you could help? My problem is that I honestly have no idea how to pronounce spoon in Swedish. Or any other word that has the sound that s and k make together. Do you have any tips for how to pronounce and remember it? Tack så mycket!! :)

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ezkertia
Ezkertia
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Ah, the famous sj-ljudet--one of the trickiest sounds (in any language) for phoneticians to describe. Depending on which dialect of Swedish is being spoken, this is pronounced in one of at least two different ways. My best understanding of how to pronounce this is to make roughly the sound at the end of Bach (as pronounced in German) but with lots of lip rounding. Many videos on YouTube are dedicated to this unusual sound and how to produce it. Lycka till!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vball_01

Thank you! You too!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Akvamariin
Akvamariin
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I think there are three ways to pronounce it, but I might be wrong about the third one. While the first one is standard, the other two are definitely acceptable and OK to use.

1: The standard pronunciation of this sound, which is used by the majority of swedes. It's most likely the one used in the Swedish course. The other two below are done with the the tip of your tongue, but when you do this one you want to use kind of the middle-back part of your tongue.

Rise that part of the tongue towards the roof of your mouth, so that you get this narrow space up there and then blow. I find that it is easier to pronounce if you go further back in the mouth (and avoid raising the front part of your tongue), but keep in mind that it is not done back in the uvula area.(The uvula is that thing that hangs like a drop in the back of your mouth) It should still be produced in the upper part of your mouth. Not too confusing I hope. :P

2: Simply like the sh sound in English. I believe this is done in Swedish speaking Finland, Northern Sweden and to some extent in other areas, like Stockholm.

3: This one is kind of like a sh but with the tip of the tongue bent backwards/ upwards towards the roof of you mouth. Isn't very common, but it's interesting to know that it exists I guess. I'd assume that it's the most common in the central parts of Sweden, but I have mainly heard it in movies and other media so I'm not sure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vball_01

Thanks! :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcinM85
MarcinM85
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There is also another variant, which is similar to the voiceless velar fricative, that is the "ch" sound in German "nacht" or х in Russian. It is most common in southern Sweden.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xanpiir

It's like a whistling sound, except more gentle and with a lower "speaking" pitch.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vball_01

Thank you! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperNova1353

Kind of sounds like Hwed

2 years ago