"I sell running shoes here."

Translation:Dw i'n gwerthu esgidiau rhedeg yma.

February 12, 2016

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/saucysalmon55

There seems to be a big issue in this course of adding alternative translations into multiple choice questions without ever covering them in advance. It's very frustrating and happens quite a bit.

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund

True. I never saw "fan hyn" anywhere before.

February 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan

Is one of these a regional variation? Dw i'n gwerthu esgidiau rhedeg fan hyn., Dw i'n gwerthu esgidiau rhedeg yma. - I feel like the Welsh course has had a lot of these pick from 3 where I had no idea one of them was right because the first time I saw it was in this pick 3 context. Was there something in the notes I missed? It is admittedly a bit annoying constantly getting it wrong when I had no way of knowing it was right (unless I stupidly missed something).

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

Both are correct and are just different ways of expressing the idea of "Here".

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan

Is one used more frequently than the other? Is there any difference in shades of meaning?

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

Well yma is more "Here" and "Fan hyn" is more this place, I would only ever say "Dowch yma"(Come here) so they aren't fully interchangeable. Can't think of any rules though sorry.

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan

That is good to know and might explain why they didn't introduce it at the same time. Anyway, that is still very helpful. Diolch!

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/pixiemena

can someone explain the "dw i" versus "dw i'n" and "dych chi" versus dych chi'n"?

March 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

dw i is "I am"; dych chi is "you are".

If that is followed by a verb, then you add the particle yn before it; this particle yn turns into 'n after a vowel.

Thus, dy i'n gwerthu would be "I am selling"; dych chi'n yfed "you are drinking". (Or: "I sell", "you drink".)

If it is followed by a noun or an adjective, you also use a particle yn (abbreviated to 'n after a vowel) but this one causes soft mutation: dw i'n goch "I am red" (cf. coch "red").

Note that the particle yn is not used with eisiau/isio to mean "I want, you want, etc." as those are not really verbs -- it is simply dw i eisiau ....

March 13, 2016
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