"Jem śniadanie i kolację."

Translation:I eat breakfast and dinner.

February 14, 2016

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krystianP4

Just to point out, dinner would be 'obiad' which in Poland is eaten quite early as opposed to other countries. We usually eat obiad during the range of hours from 2 - 4 pm. Supper would be 'kolacja' and would be a more lighter meal eaten from about 6/7 pm onwards. There is no word for lunch in polish, instead we just copy it and say lunch.

April 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hereandthere715

I'm a native English speaker. Dinner and supper are actually the same meal. Supper is just a less commonly used term. The three main meals we eat are EITHER breakfast, lunch, and dinner OR breakfast, lunch, and supper. Although, when we group them like this, I don't think we ever use the term supper.

However, when my Polish friends come over, they are resistant to calling lunch by the Polish term obiad. They use the English word and call it lunch, because it is so early for them. So, I see your point. However, I do think that, technically, lunch is obiad and dinner kolacja.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Not a perfect method by any means, but there are 190 Google results for "breakfast, lunch, and supper" to 329 for "breakfast, lunch, and dinner".

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

The way you describe it, they're still "lunch" and "dinner" in America, respectively. Between 2:00-4:00 is still lunch, and after 6:00 is dinner. If you're 80 years old, then dinner might be at 4:00. Some people call a late dinner "supper," but it's not common. I guess "brunch" might be "lanć" in Polish, since it falls between 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.

April 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

Just report if you ever find that obiad=lunch kolacja=dinner is not accepted. You know that obiad is обе́д.

April 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daughterofAlbion

"Dinner" is the main meal of the day. Whether that takes place around the middle of the day or in the evening differs between regions of the United States and between regions of the United Kingdom, and also by social class. it tends to be dependent on climate (hotter regions tend to have the main meal in the evening) and social class (if you do heavy manual labour you are more likely to eat a substantial meal at midday) and a host of other factors.

Am I right in thinking that obiad works in the same way, and that kolacje is "the final meal of the day"?

September 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
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kolacja, otherwise right. Out of the three main meals obiad is the second and kolacja the third one.

September 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daughterofAlbion

Now I am more confused. You say that I am right and obiad, like "dinner", is the main meal of the day (whenever you eat that), but then specify that it is the second one!

What I said was that dinner is the main meal of the day. It can therefore either be the second or the third, depending on social customs.

I am confused to your reference to "the three main meals". Do you eat three meals of equal size every day?

September 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
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Well, maybe it's just my thinking, but to me the idea of three main meals (plus two smaller if someone has time, plus of course snacks etc. or any more individual changes) always seemed quite obvious...

September 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Yes, many people eat three meals that have roughly the same caloric count. Also, I've never heard of dinner being the second meal of the day, unless you skipped breakfast. In regions where they say "supper," is dinner the second meal there? What about breakfast and lunch? 1st and 2nd?

September 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Can be breakfast/lunch/supper or breakfast/dinner/supper. I have to think that second pattern particularly is steadily vanishing in the U.S. at least.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LloydJudd

Kolacje is more correctly translated as "supper"- a small meal taken later at night- perhaps traditionally Poles don't eat "dinner" or "tea" (australian) - a large meally eaten at around 6 or 7PM.

February 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eCh3f

None of this ^ really holds for me...: Breakfast = śniadanie

Lunch = drugie śniadanie (Around noonish?)

Dinner = obiad (Traditionally around 13-15? At polish resorts. But is really the after school/work meal.)

Supper = kolacja (Anywhere between 18-24:00 really, usually the last meal of the day.. and by older standards probably around 6-7 so that you don't "eat before bed" XD) Period. Koniec kropka. :P

You have to remember that traditionally Polish people would get up SUPER early, and breakfast was very early like 7 for example and lunch/drugie śniadanie would probably be 10ish? Work and school in Poland start and stop early by 1-3 usually.., so dinner/obiad would be then. And supper/kolacja would end up being relatively early as well due to earlier bed times.., this has probably moved to later in recent times, but has been pretty much universal no matter where in Poland I've been.., and also here in Canada.. Więc ja nie wiem o czym wy i Duolingo nawet gadacie :P

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daughterofAlbion

Thanks for a really clear explanation. Do you have any idea why Poles started so early? In most countries working days traditionally started at dawn.

September 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SacchaLouise

This one confused me because I was tempted to put dinner & tea. Where i'm from North East Uk, We have breakfast (when we wake up), sometimes brunch, Dinner, Tea and then anything after that is supper.

Breakfast = Up to 10am Brunch = 10/11am Dinner = 12/1pm Tea = 4-6:30pm Supper = 7pm onwards

Obviously many people in the uk are different and i think people down south call it lunch and dinner..

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
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Added "tea" (which we usually try to accept, but true, it wasn't here), but the first one was the breakfast, not lunch/dinner ;)

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Do you "eat tea"?

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
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I believe that works only as 'having tea' :)

July 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celina689105

I sometimes call the meal at the end of the day 'tea'. I'm in South UK

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

How do you refer to your consumption of this meal? "having tea"? "eating tea"?

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celina689105

That's a good question!
Both I suppose. Having = We are having tea at 6pm. Or, What are you doing now? We are having tea.... So not necessarily eating it but all sitting round the table with food infront of us. Eating my tea = is as it it says. Does that make sense/help you?

piguy3, I missed out a word...It would read better if you said 'eating MY tea' 'eat YOUR tea'

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Yeah, I think so. It's just a thought that comes up to someone not at all familiar with this nomenclature: they have a meal called "tea"... Does that mean they say they "eat tea"? To somebody for whom "tea" is only ever a beverage, that is a very odd turn of phrase! But, not knowing one way or the other, one might suspect it's always avoided in favor of "having tea." But sounds like not? Puts a smile on my face :) Eat some tea everybody!

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gogogibbo

'Kolacje' = 'tea' in the North of England just btw. I put it absent-mindedly and I will adjust but you should still mark it correct, not wrong.

September 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
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We started accepting "tea" at some point (as written above), it's just "eating tea" that we consider too strange. But as this sentence is about "breakfast and tea", I guess even eating makes sense here. Added now.

September 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnoldpitt

Dinner has such variable meaning in English that I think foreign language courses should avoid it Lunch is always in the day. Supper is always in the evening

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hereandthere715

Dinner can't be avoided, as it is a much more common word than supper. ;-) Excluding the term brunch, Breakfast is the first meal of the day, lunch the second (or mid-day, if you skipped breakfast), and dinner the third.

As a side note, Brunch is between the breakfast and lunch times of day (the term is literally just squishing the two words into one: BR-eakfast and l-UNCH). This term is slightly more vague. For me, it is only called brunch if it comes between the times of breakfast and lunch AND it is eaten to replace at least breakfast and probably also lunch. For me, it should also be bigger than a normal breakfast to be called brunch. If I simply slept in and ate a late breakfast, it would still be called breakfast--especially if I still planned to eat lunch. That's why I say this term is more vague. It's more open to whatever the speaker thinks of when they think of Brunch.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celina689105

Although I never use 'Supper' it's only ever 'Tea' or 'Dinner' in the evening and 'Lunch' during the day. I love how we all have different variations.

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pavelmeshchanov

The hobbitses have among all already mentioned "11ses" et cetera

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wen3wen

haha, funny sentence. I can image someone who can eat breakfast and lunch together. But for eating breakfast and dinner together. :D leftovers? All in all, at least I trained how to use "śniadanie" i "kolacja".

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryAnn314963

Why kolację and not kolacja?

June 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wen3wen

SVO → S(omitted) V O(Bernik); śniadanie(mianownik) → śniadanie(bernik); kolacja(mianownik) → kolację(bernik)

June 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

In American English, "dinner" is the more common term, but "supper" means the same thing. For some reason, Poles call obiad dinner and kolacja supper, but they have no word for lunch. In other Slavic languages, "obied," "obid," etc. mean "lunch," not dinner.

April 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daughterofAlbion

Sorry Va-diim, but this is not correct. "Dinner" is the main meal (which may be taken in the evening), "supper" is a light meal taken at night. (Duolingers from the U.S. have confirmed this still applies there also.)

Is the Russian обед a light meal?

September 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

From https://www.duolingo.com/comment/13795989

in today's Russia, обед - whatever you call it in English - is always a midday meal, so it will only be fair to call it lunch to avoid confusion. It was not the case one hundred years ago when people could have обед any time from 3pm till late in the evening and, in some cases, it could last till 2am (there are plenty examples of that in the 19th century Russian literature).

I'm curious if obiad has had a similar trajectory.

va-dim is right about AmE dinner vs supper - for most people. 2/3 hold there to be no difference or don't use the word supper at all. http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_96.html

September 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

I've never been personally exposed to "supper," so I'm not familiar with it. To me, the "main" meal is arbitrary. Lunch can be bigger than dinner, if size is what makes it "main." In Russian, обед has nothing to do with light or heavy. It's the meal one eats during the day, and ужин is the third, evening meal, translates to "dinner," or "supper."

September 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

You can't tell me what's correct or incorrect. It's not set in stone. Wherever you are, maybe supper and dinner have different meanings than where I've lived. I've never lived in the American Midwest or East--only in the Western United States. I've never had "supper" with anyone, nor have ever known people who use the word "supper." To me, supper doesn't exist because it has never existed for me nor anyone I know. I don't know what you mean by "main meal" or "light meal" because breakfast, lunch, and dinner, can all be light or heavy. Is dinner the "main" meal because you normally sit down with your family? Why else would a meal be a "main" meal.

In Russian, it's very simple: Breakfast, lunch, and dinner is respectively завтрак, обед, и ужин. No need for needless confusion

September 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claire_resurgent

Quick question about the limits of the present tense.

I'm pretty sure this means "I eat lunch and dinner (sometimes) (at home)" - present tense showing a habit or general truth.

Can this also mean "I am eating lunch and dinner (here today)" - a single event that will begin soon?

(And if the answer is "no," I'll wait to understand "zjem" and "będę jeść" and so on when I get to them.)

October 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

It can be used in the near future.

October 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

Polish "kolacja" is "supper" while Italian "collazione" is "breakfast". They are obviously related, they sound almost the same, but it's a false friend.

December 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dirosissaias

In greek we say «κολατσίο» or «κολατσό» (kolats(i)o) when referring informally to a little meal regardless of the hour. I am wondering what the etymology of this word is, is there anyone that can help?

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
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Seems like it's the same, from Latin and indeed it used to mean 'a small meal'.

March 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

And it preserves that meaning in French.

June 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Might as well throw the not-so-common English word "collation" in there as well ;)

December 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

Never heard of an English word "collation" so far (I'm not an English native speaker). It means "light meal"?? New word, thanks!

December 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadedLilies

Why is kolacje the accusative and sniadanie is nominative? Aren't they both receiving the action?

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
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They are both Accusative, but "śniadanie" is neuter, and neuter nouns have the Accusative form identical to Nominative.

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadedLilies

Dziękuję bardzo!

March 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicholaus200

why is sniadanie not accusitive? or is it?

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 5

It is. Neuter nouns look the same in Nominative and Accusative.

April 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicholaus200

thanks :)) sorry for spam :DD

April 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martijna151515

Kolacja = M. Kolacja D. Kolacji C. Kolacji B. Kolacja N. Kolacji M. Kolacji W. Kolacja ! I polish girl, it is easy xd

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sir681544

Should be supper

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 5

That depends on the dialect of English you are more familiar with. For example, I'm pretty sure that most Polish people would indeed say "supper". I would.

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pavelmeshchanov

Agree. I am Russian, I would say supper as well.

February 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophiaDave

no that's wrong it should be jem sniadanie i herbata. I can't write the accent marks.

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celina689105

No, you can't eat 'herbata', you drink herbata. But in Some parts of UK we sometimes Kolacja = Tea (as in a meal) All a bit confusing really!!

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnoldpitt

As our child our meals were breakfast, Dinner at midday and tea in the early evening. Lunch was a snack in mid morning, Supper a snack before bed. This varied with time and class Working families roughly followed the use I have given but the toffs used lunch for midday and Dinner for a mid evening meal. Over the years the meaning of all these meals has shifted towards the toffs' version Tea, about five o'clock, is now a children's meal. BUT it is all very flexible according to class, region and aspirations

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celina689105

I agree, it is very flexible and individual. As for 'toffs' I think you could have chosen a better word! For those who don't know the word.......Definition - a toff is a derogatory stereotype for someone with an aristocratic background or belonging to the landed gentry, particularly someone who exudes an air of superiority.

September 19, 2018
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