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"¿Él pensó en sus padres?"

Translation:Did he think about his parents?

0
5 years ago

86 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/newrat
newrat
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Why "en" sus padres? Why not "sobre" or "de"?

89
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

pensar en is idiomatically "to think about" in terms of the "object" of your thoughts

pensar de is about expressing an opinion, the way you might ask in English "What do you think of him?" (What is your opinion of him?)

pensar sobre just isn't used (to my knowledge)

263
Reply114 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crisp123
crisp123
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When we ask ¿qué piensa sobre algo/alguien? or ¿qué piensa acerca de algo/alguien? is like asking ¿qué opinión tiene de algo/alguien?

15
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie7511

Thanks this was very helpful

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sununa
Sununa
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Thanks. A very useful link.

1
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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Thanks for the link. Span¡shD!ct is also an awesome resource with regard to providing multiple meanings/uses of words.

1
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pickedup

What's wrong with "Did he think of their parents?"

66
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calebrankin

NOTHING

21
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Khristafer
Khristafer
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For a did-question, I think the Spanish would have the pronoun after the verb. (But a did question in English would be more natural)

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

DL accepta ahora, Diciembre 2016

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gyenesvi
gyenesvi
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"He thought about his parents?" is not a proper english question, only "Did he think about his parents?"

9
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zombiesue

You can make any English statement into a question with tone of voice ("going up"at the end) and that is true across the globe. It's usually used, as has already been stated, to show surprise. Ex: He failed the test. - He failed the test!? He's 30 years old and he still can't drive. - He's 30 and he still can't drive!? He got really drunk. Then he started dancing. - He started dancing?! When he thought he was going to die, he thought about his parents. - He thought about his parents!? but they were never kind to him!

All of those make perfect sense, all contain questions that could be statements depending on how you read them. You don't necessarily need a "question word"to ask a question.

50
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindPradhan

Who is this 30 year old person you know who fails a test, does not drive, gets drunk and starts dancing and then thinks about his parents?

11
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dorothy844695

You made LOL! Thanks

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Zombiesue, sorry I did not read your excellent response before commenting to gyen... . I agree with you, entirely.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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I would have to disagree as a native English speaker. If the last syllable of parents is spoken in a higher tone, then it can be understood as a question.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheDrWho

I agree... Sorry @zombiesue.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ercarterrn

Why is there no personal "a" here before "sus padres"

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelCOwens

I have the same question. Can someone explain?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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There is probably a complex explanation regarding verb+prepositions / preposition+(potential)direct objects, and their possible relationships, but I think it is easier to just say:

Spanish prepositions don't double up. "¿Él vio a sus padres?" but "¿Él pensó en sus padres?"

This is just an observation, not a quotable rule that I can find, so if anyone disagrees please do.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cosmina_Flucus

How would the question in Spanish sound like if I wanted to ask "did he think of his parents?" ?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evrickk

Same thing.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbarasmussen

No. You'd have to leave out "él" (which you could've done in this case too). You could also say "Penso él".

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cosmina_Flucus

Thanks! I have asked this because duo marked "did he think of his parents?" as a wrong translation for that.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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It was accepted today, 10/30/2017.

1
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesWashi

Sometimes people in english leave out the questions starters like "will you, can you, did you try," etc and they use the altering of their voice at the end to indicate question is being asked, i think this is true in other languages, duo hardly use typical way of asking questions like in english

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kburns421

I put that exact answer (Did he think of his parents?) and got it right.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2ndpattern

When I learned Spanish in school I could have sworn we were told the s/v order had to be reversed in questions: "¿Pensó él en sus padres?" I haven't seen Duolingo do this at all.

Is this an optional thing? Is it a regional variation? Does it change the emphasis?

2
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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This is a really good question and I hope a native speaker answers. My thoughts until they do:

Yes, I'd say the order is optional, but commonly reversed in a yes/no question, so I think you are right that "¿Pensó él en sus padres?" would generally be more common.

With other questions that begin with a question word (por qué, dónde, cuánto etc.) the verb will nearly always come next before the subject: ¿En quién pensó él?

As far as yes/no questions go there may be some regional variation, personal preference, or emphasis that contributes to the chosen order. Native speakers may need to advise.

One thing I have heard is that placing the subject before the verb can imply scepticism/surprise, which would make "¿Él pensó en sus padres?" translate like "Did he (really) think about his parents?" We can employ the same statement question form in English to express the same scepticism/surprise: He thought about his parents?

1
Reply18 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2ndpattern

Thank you for the well-thought-out answer. Have a lingot.

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Germodeltoro
Germodeltoro
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Instead of en, could "acerca de" be a valid substitute?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

See comment from Daniel-in-BC. Pensar en and pensar de are phrases in Spanish.

You wouldn't use pensar acerca de for the same reason you wouldn't use pensar sobre -- pensar en is the correct way to express "to think about"

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabutman

Why is it not "Had he thought about his parents?" to get the past tense?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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That would make it past perfect instead of simple past. In Spanish, the past perfect tense is formed by using the imperfect tense of the auxiliary verb "haber" with the past participle (StudySpanish.com), so your sentence might be "¿Él habia pensado en sus padres?" (but a native speaker would need to confirm).

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomk123

Why is "en" here instead of "de"? Is it because the verb is "pensar"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Yes, these are called "linked verbs" - certain verbs are used with certain prepositions to mean certain things.

Pensar en = to think about (as in contemplating/ruminating)

http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/vrbsprep.htm

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shynfjf
shynfjf
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I didn't know that you have to put the preposition "en" to convey that meaning. I thought "a" is used in this case. Is it wrong? Can I say "¿Él pensó a sus padre?" or is it wrong?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Yep, it's wrong. Pensar takes some slightly odd prepositions but they can be wrangled into English :)

Pensar en: To think on ... (think about something)

Pensar que: To think that ... (believe something is the case)

Pensar de: To think of ... (hold an opinion about something)

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nightmare252

Why is there a question mark as if that was a surprise that he thought about them

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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The implication of surprise that goes with that specific word order in English isn't necessarily present in Spanish. You could translate the Spanish here as either "Did he think about his parents?" (no surprise) or "He thought about his parents?" (surprise). In a real life situation or a literary one, tone of voice and or context is going to tell you which is the more accurate translation.

Read through this whole thread and you'll see that there are a number of subtle changes that could made to this translation.

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saurabhmehta

Why is en required here?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"pensar en" is just one of many fixed phrases in Spanish. A lot of verbs will come "attached" to a certain preposition to mean different things.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boricua022708

Just a question about pronunciation; When using these preterite forms of the verbs, like "bailó", the 'o' with the accent is pronounced sort of with emphasis? It would be pronounced differently than the present tense, I dance ( Yo bailo ) ?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Yes - pronunciation makes a difference!

Bailo - I dance Bailó - He/she/it/usted danced

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boricua022708

Thanks for replying. :D

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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it marks the stress - -
bailo is pronounced BAI-lo
bailó is pronounced bai-LÓ

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alejandro110780

"He thought about his parents"? is the other correct answer. I answered "He thought of your parents" and it's correct too. Can someone explain this further please... how would you know when to use his over your?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Context.

If there is no subject change or mention of another person, it's safe to assume (especially in Duo) that "su/sus" refers to whoever was already mentioned in the sentence.

So this one is probably "HE thought about HIS parents"

But "su" can also mean "his/hers/yours/its" so Duo should accept those as correct translations.

In real life there would be more context - sentences before or after that would provide more information.

Also, if you wanted to clarify that "sus" was referring to someone else, you would probably not use "sus" and instead use the "de ____" contstruction.

"él pensó en los padres de ella" - he thought about her parents

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alejandro110780

Gracias JuevesHuevos!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/measerp

"Has he thought about his parents" should be accepted.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Conversationally for sure, but technically that's present perfect: "¿Él ha pensado en sus padres?"

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kmessel

I am wondering if sus denotes paricularly "his" "her" or "their" parents. I said "Did he think about their parents" and was corrected "did he think about her parents" ???

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Nope. "Sus" could mean his, her, their, your (formal), or even its. "Did he think about their parents?" is fine, so report it.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joel618962

How can he have more than one father ......thats nonsense

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Well, two fathers is entirely possible, but I'm pretty sure this isn't the intended meaning. Spanish uses "padres" for "parents," "abuelos" for "grandparents," "hijos" for "children" etc.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MonroeJessica

being past tense, why not "Has he thought of/ about his parents?" (my answer)

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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That is present perfect tense, not past tense.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MonroeJessica

Ok thanks!

0
Reply2 years ago