https://www.duolingo.com/Maxim_SMWD

Sto vs. Sono

Good Afternoon all, I was wondering what the difference is between the two verb forms 'sto' and 'sono'. Could somebody please clear this up for me; at the moment I'm just making the asumption that it is the same as the 'estoy' and 'soy' verbs in Spanish, where one is 'I am currently' and the other being 'I am in general'.

February 14, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/IainDearg

In my experience in Italian (eg) "sto parlando" would be used to emphasise that I am [right now in the process of] talking. For example: "stavo parlando quando รจ entrato" = "I was [in the process of] talking when he entered".

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafforza

True, and this connects to the meaning "to stay". We don't say "I stay talking" in English, but the meaning reflected in this phrase has a greater degree of immediacy, like the Italian.

Stare really more closely means "to stay" than "to be"

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KerryBritton

Also, as in spanish, for states of being, as in "Sto bene".

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Tamuna10

Yes, it's the same as in Spanish. You also use "sto" in Italian when talking about being in some places, for example: sto al ristorante=I'm at the restaurant.

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GiuliaJill92

That's not it actually, you should say "sono al ristorante".

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Maxim_SMWD

Thank you that helps a lot :)

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Tamuna10

You're welcome :)

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2110

It's actually the exact opposite of Spanish in that context: "sto al ristorante" in Italian means "I live in the restaurant". "Stare" as a temporary state is dialectal, mainly in Southern Italy, due to the Spanish rule (the previous sentence is commonly interpreted as synonymous with "essere" in those dialects). When speaking of emotions Italian uses "stare" with adverbs (sto bene = I am well), but almost never with adjectives (sono innamorato = I am in love, the exact opposite of Spanish "estoy enamorado").

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Maxim_SMWD

I did the 'gerund' verbs in Italian and they use 'sto', it wouldn't make sense with what you're saying, I can't always be eating! :)

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2110

In the gerund stare is an auxiliary, it doesn't have anything to do with its meaning. Several conjugations are missing for "essere" and "stare" is used instead, e.g. "stato" is the past participle for both verbs.

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Maxim_SMWD

Ahh ok thanks for the clarification :)

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GScottOliver

Ah, this explains why "I am sure" is Sono sicuro. Thank you, Brother Ant!

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafforza

I don't find them to be the same as Spanish at all!!

Also, from my experience Spanish is more rigid with the distinction. But that might just be my perception.

Italian uses essere far more often than spanish uses ser.

'Stare' almost always means to stay except when talking about very specific states of being. In general,

-you don't say sto felice, you say sono felice.

-you don't say sto triste, you say sono triste.

-you don't say sto confuso, you say sono confuso.

-you don't say sto nervoso, you say sono nervoso.

It is very different from spanish

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny

One of the explanations I liked about the difference between sto and sono is : sto is used with adverbs while sono is used with adjectives. Example: sto bene , sono italiano.

See below video for more details:

https://youtu.be/2HqKdJJvFp0

October 24, 2017
Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.