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  5. "No, I do not have to go."

"No, I do not have to go."

Translation:Nac oes, does dim rhaid i fi fynd.

February 15, 2016

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flinnian

is Nag Oes acceptable instead of nac oes? Nag oes is what I have seen before. Didn't give me the option of reporting, it just assumed it was a type


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

Nag oes is how we pronounce it here in the north, but I'd be surprised to see that written.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

It's how we say it down South too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

ac and nac are often pronounced as ag and nag for some reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdb119
  • 1895

Can someone kindly remind me when/why 'mi' would be used in place of 'fi', please? I seem to have forgotten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

No reason - either is acceptable in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronwyn528860

Is it different depending on the region?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Not really. It can very by level of formality, though.

In the colloquial language, as taught on this course, i mi, i fi are both commonly used. In more formal language, i mi, imi are more usual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

In colloquial Welsh i mi is definitely more common in the North and i fi is more widely used in the South.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanWoods0

I answered "nag oes" and was told there is a typo in my answer. I thought it could be either nac oes or nag oes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

It is written as nac oes, but sometimes pronounced as /nag oes/. Some people spell according to their pronunciation in casual usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moira582602

"G" and "c" are what is called "Suspect Pairs" - that is they are made very closely in the mouth, so are often interchangeable in spoken speech but not so always in written. (Gosh takes me back to my linguistics course many moons ago!!!)

I know here is Cardiff my friends usually say "nag" but I get told off if I write it as "nag." It is accepted when I say it, though. Often spoken languages are like that - English is no exception.

In my uni. Welsh course notes it is written as "nac oes" and that is what we are expected to write.

"i fi" is used here in the south, in Cardiff. But a lady I go to practice speaking Welsh with, is from the north, and says "i mi" So swamae is right. Difference between N & S and we are taught both in DuoLingo.

Hope that is helpful.

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