"I like you."

Translation:Je t'aime bien.

January 17, 2013

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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The answer given as correct for the translation exercise was Je t'aime bien which was completely new to me. I guess if you are saying you like someone that is a situation for using a familiar phrasing. This answer given here is different from the exercise and is closer to the one I gave. I was wrong anyway because of positioning vous after aime rather than before as it should be. Also I left out bien.

I wonder why the absolute requirement for bien. Isn't that more like "I really like you"?

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lukelbd

I saw this explained by an experienced member in another comment. It's because "je t'aime" usually means "I love you," so when talking about people, the distinction between "like" and "love" is made by adding something like "bien", which I suppose makes it more polite/general and therefore weaker.

August 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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lukelbd

That is correct. My comment was written a very, very long time ago.

August 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/T_P
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I put "Je t'adore". I thought "adore" meant like and "aime" meant love.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/prijelanakole

actually it is the opposite. Adore means love, aime is ...less intense.

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverMolb
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Then why does Duolingo stick with "I love you"="J'adore"??? I would guess adore means adore and not love. ther is a conceptual difference between devotion ( love) and speechless amazement ( adore).

December 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/liveforcookies42

Actually you could say someone look at something in lovingly

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryChandra
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I had a 'choose the correct words' activity... It had my answer correct but it said i wrote 't' aime' (i didnt get a choice) and that i shouldn't have spaces after apostrophes. What's with that?

April 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/yadira569497

Isnt this transelated better to

You pleased me

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lemniscatarum
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It might work like manquer or an idiom.

November 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/YyChen1
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Why not Vous me plaisez?

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/oldkyrgyz

It is my understanding that "Je t'aime" directed to person means "I love you" (in a romantic context) but directed to anything else mean "I like you". To say "I like you" to a person we must say "Je t'aime bien". That's French for you, and they tell me not to ask WHY?

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Clayton1224

this is too hard!!! For me!!!

March 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/booklvr44

In French, I know that "Je t'aime" means I love you.

But in English, we have "I like you" which is kind of romantic but not as serious as "I love you." We also have "I like you" in a non-romantic sense.

Is there a difference between "I like you" (romantic) and "I like you" (as a friend or person)?

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RakeemMoses

I'm anbit confused to the direct translation here Wouldnt this sentence come across as "You please me," in the English language? Also i didn't know aime could've been used in French to mean "love," pretty interesting tidbit

October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Leso_varen

For me, Je vous aime bien = I like you well, whereas je t'aime = I love you . Correct me if I'm wrong, though :)

May 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/cmswahoo

I believe that you are correct. My (big) French dictionary has like (verb): aimer (bien). If you didn't add the bien, it would be understood as love.

July 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

Oh, I wasn't sure & just put regular je t'aime but from now on I will try to remember to add bien. [:

March 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Laetitia_Lalila

I think this is a very interesting observation. Can anyone please clarify?

July 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/PonyVu
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I think "I like you" is not the same with "Je t'aime", this is "I love you".

July 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/werekitty
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I remember this sentence being in the lessons earlier and it was simple "J'aime vous", so why is it wrong? why must "bien" be added?

October 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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French J'aime can be general = I like or I love

French J'aime bien is specific = I like

English I love is specific = j'aime

English I like is specific = j'aime bien.

October 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RoyK.

what's wrong with; J'aimez vous ?

December 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/prijelanakole

"je" is the first person of singular, therefore the form of the verb is "aime" not "aimez". And the pronoun ("vous") has to come before the verb. so: Je vous aime.

December 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/malhalmol
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Why je t'aime is wrong? Can anyone tell me...(¬_¬)

May 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GabeDC
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Je t'aime means "I love you," although on a literal level, it reads as "I like you." In French, the verb aimer means "to like" unless the object is a person or an animal, in which case the intent becomes "to love."

In the context of aimer meaning "love," using bien with aimer acts as a softener, turning "love" into "like."

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/malhalmol
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Why vous aime Not aimez

May 31, 2017

[deactivated user]

    Read the comments above. If you answered, "J'aimez vous." then you got it wrong because "aimer" needs to conjugate with "je" and not "vous". The correct translation would be, "Je vous aime.".

    June 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/ChicagoAmal

    I wrote je t'aime. It gave je t'aime bien as the correct answer. The English translation was not I like you very much, it was I like you.

    June 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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    Bien has the function of reducing the intensity of aimer. Therefore aimer bien is like instead of love. It is just how it works with that verb.

    June 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zahra770150

    Why not: "j'aimé toi"

    June 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Charles74306

    Why don't we use "Je t'aime"?

    July 21, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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    In the particular usage you are suggesting, the meaning is I love you. There are various ways of saying I like you. that make it clear you are not saying I love you. This Duo example is one of them.

    But a French speaker will take je t'aime to mean I love you every time. If that is what you really meant to say, no problem. But if it isn't you may be surprised at the result, pleasantly or not.

    If you listen to French music, you will hear je t'aime mentioned quite often. They are not singing about how they think their boss is a great guy, a particular bus driver always makes them feel welcome when they get on the bus, some one they just met at a party or any such.

    July 21, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Bethen_Mist

    I put je t'aime and it told me the correct response was je t'apprecie . I have never in my lessons seen it written like that.

    November 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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    Je t'aime is incorrect as a way to say I like you. Correct answer for Duo is je t'aime bien. A less common answer is, as you were advised, je t'apprecie.

    November 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/KobusingeMK

    Same dilemma i am in now

    December 6, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Eowyn11

    This one should be in the bonus lessons Flirting

    February 27, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/unique52
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    Why is "J'aime vous" not acceptable?

    May 3, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/GabeDC
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    The words have to come in a particular order—here, subject–object–verb instead of, as in English, subject–verb–object. Your example would then be "Je vous aime bien." (Without bien, the meaning becomes "I love you" instead of "I like you.")

    June 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Harmander01

    "Je vous aime bien" not acceptable, throws incorrect

    August 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jayparts1

    I put "Je vous aime bien." Does it have to be "t'aime" not "vous aime?"

    July 22, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Harmander01

    Same case with me

    August 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Hilary526728

    I'm just learning how to do the Gallic shrug now.........

    October 12, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ro8ert
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    I put 'je vous aime bien' and was marked as wrong. Im not sure why?

    November 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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    Not sure what Duo's reasoning is but I would be surprised to see an expression of affection finished up with a formal style of address.

    The English equivalent would be something like .... I like you, sir.

    November 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ninszy
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    Why add bien though?

    November 28, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/cynsanity
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    le sigh

    January 22, 2019
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