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https://www.duolingo.com/Karol4717

What do you think of Esperanto's son...Ido?

Karol4717
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You know, that barely spoken language that corrected some things about Esperanto. It wears a blue flag. Ido=son, offspring.

What do you think, should we be mad at Zamenhof for not accepting changes before? should we make an alliance? should we ignore them? should we do anything for making the peace that both languages are looking for?

Evil me: Catch it before it replaces us!

Mi ne scias! Nun mi havas problemojn en mia kapo pri kion studi.

2 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zubiz
zubiz
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It's just another language to me and I don't see any need to do anything special about it.

Other than that, I don't think "corrected" is the right word to describe the changes ido made, they are just... changes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

We actually already made peace. Many if not most Ido speakers also speak Esperanto. The Ido speakers I had talked to so far had an absolute amicable relation towards Esperanto. To put it short I would say that Ido speakers acknowledge that Esperanto has the richer culture and Esperanto speakers acknowledge that Ido is linguistically more interesting as they are experimenting with different language features.

So no bad feelings between Ido and Esperanto.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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>> Esperanto speakers acknowledge that Ido is linguistically more interesting <<

This is far from a common view in the Esperanto community.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

There's no such thing as a common view in the Esperanto community.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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It seems from some of your other posts that you just like to argue. If you think there is no such thing as a common view in the community, you shouldn't have expressed one in your comment above (i.e. the line I quoted.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

Well, I am not about to argue with you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I see what you did there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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I think it's the most successful of the many Esperantidos that have sprung up over the years, though I have the impression that the number of fluent speakers worldwide nowadays is on the order of Klingon - several dozen. Perhaps roughly on a par with Volapük or slightly more successful, but magnitudes away from Esperanto.

I do sometimes wish that people who propose certain reforms for Esperanto that were incorporated into Ido (for example, a male suffix to parallel the female -in one, or separate singular/plural "you" forms, or getting rid of the diacritics) would use Ido instead -- after all, the change has already been made there, so why try to make it again?

Also, I've heard that Zamenhof even proposed some additional changes which were not, however, accepted by the speakers as a whole, and I think that one of the big parts of Esperanto's success is its stability.

You can pick up a textbook and not have to worry that it's too old and describes essentially a completely different language (as with Volapük, where you have to worry about learning Schleyer's Volapük or Arie de Jong's Volapük). You can read old books and not be completely puzzled even if preferred word usage or grammar has moved slightly.

Also, I'm not sure what peace you are referring to. I think that most Esperanto speakers and most Idists already live in peace and have no animosity towards one another.

And finally, if Ido replaces Esperanto: so what? Isn't the important thing to have an international language that is useful and successful? Whether that language is Ido, Esperanto, or Ithkuil is (I think) not as important. What would be bad is having hundreds of auxlangs each with only a few hundred speakers -- but as it is, we have hundreds of auxlangs but only a handful have a reasonable number of speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedExplosives

On Wikipedia it say that there are about 150-300 speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Interesting; that's three to six times what I expected, though still not tremendously impressive.

Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedExplosives

No it's impressive at all, but still interesting. lol.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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What do we think about it? Most Esperanto speakers DON'T think about it. I'm sure there are quite a few people who would be surprised that anybody speaks Ido at all today. I have never been a proponent of Ido, and I would go so far as to say that I've had some rather annoying exchanges with Idists over the years. On the other hand, I've had some very positive exchanges with Idists - and at least one has actively helped keep me honest in some of my "buffoonery" where Ido was the butt of the joke.

I would generally recommend "ignoring them". If you're interested to learn how other languages work, don't bother with Ido because it's too much like Ido. There are more interesting things to study. By the way, I think it's a matter for discussion (read "endless boring debate") as to whether Ido actually fixed the problems with Esperanto or made them worse.

As for making an alliance, that's a joke. (Sorry - but it really is.) There really is an Ido community, but it is very small and consists largely of people who speak Esperanto anyway -- so there already is an alliance in that sense. There are more people finishing the Duolingo course every day than who participate in the world Ido convention.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaLind3

I would like to know why so many Esperanto speakers seem to dislike Ido so much. I have been studying Esperanto as a serious pursuit for a while now; I encountered Ido and have found myself increasingly attracted to it. It seems to be all and all a more streamlined language than Esperanto; fewer syllables are often needed to convey the same information.(Mika vs. malgranda for instance) and only uses the n suffix in cases where there is an ambiguity. I also like the way Ido has incorporated many Greek words. A friend told me she really likes that aspect of the language. I would appreciate hearing more detailed arguments on both sides of this debate.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Compare your opening line with mine:

  • you: I would like to know why so many Esperanto speakers seem to dislike Ido so much.
  • me: What do we think about it? Most Esperanto speakers DON'T think about it.

I would spend some time with some Idists before deciding to spend too much time learning it. We learn a language to speak with the people who speak it, don't we?

I'm assuming your reply was framed in terms of mine because it's a direct reply. If it wasn't, my apologies and please disregard.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnKing147785
JohnKing147785
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I like some of the changes to simplify the grammar. Not sure I like all the changes to the vocabulary.

1 month ago