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https://www.duolingo.com/finndj

Swedish text talk - is their such thing?

finndj
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In English, we have things such as gtg, lol, and rofl. Is there a Swedish equivalent?

Here are my ideas for what the Swedish equivalents could be:

gtg = mg (måste gå)

lol = js (jag skrattar)

rofl = jspg (jag skrattar på golvet)

Thanks in advance!

2 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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Yes, there is. But in most cases, including your ones, the English ones are used.

A Swedish one that I can think of right now and that actually has been used is asg, short for asgarvar. "Garva" is slang for laughing, and "as-" is a common strengthening modifyer, so it's used kind of like rofl. But there is no asgkopter in Swedish (yet). :p

Also, sometimes letters have been used as syllables or parts of syllables where it coincides with how the letter of the alphabet is named. Thus, you might see "vi cs" for "vi ses" (see you!) and "vad ql" for "vad kul" ("that's funny"). The word "eller" ("or") may be shortened in this way to lr.

Numbers have also played an occasional role where a part of a word is the same as the number. Words like "3vlig" (trevlig, "nice") and "7k" (sjuk, "sick") are two notable examples.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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Some other ones off the top of my head:

  • d - det/du

  • e - är

  • å - och/att (really just a phonetic spelling)

  • o - och

  • a - ja (also a phonetic spelling. btw, seems like we've run out of single vowel letters)

  • tkr - tycker

  • mkt - mycket

  • tsm - tillsammans

  • dax - dags (as in dags att åka!)

  • oxå - också

  • vgd - vad gör du?

  • dd? - du då?

  • sj - själv?

Some personal favorites:

  • isf - i så fall

  • iaf - i alla fall

  • iofs - i och för sig

  • eg - egentligen

  • ev - eventuellt (this a surprisingly common word)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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these are amazing. I hadn't yet come across "i och för sig", which seems to mean "per se" or "in and of itself"... hmm.

This link says it means "on second thought"... ??? http://sv.bab.la/lexikon/svensk-engelsk/i-och-for-sig

"vgd" for a phrase that sounds like "vayöööru" hurts my Anglophone brain, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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It is very rarely used in the first sense, mostly in the second sense. It could also be translated as "on the other hand". "Per se" is better translated as "i sig (självt)" or "som sådan".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidstenbeck

I'd say that the most common translation of how iofs/i och för sig is used is essentially "(well,) now that you think about it (...)"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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Wow! Thanks!

Is there a Swedish version of "wow?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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People do frequently say "wow", but you can express surprise/amazement in many ways. "Näe!" and "va!" (more indicating disbelief) are some common ones, also "oj!" but that one is kind of between whoops and wow in its meaning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lydiaoxenstierna

Cool! Also 'Näe!' is the imperative form of 'to see' in Finnish :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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Cool! In Swedish, it's just a colloquial variant of "nej" :) In fact, you can use "nej" in the same way, to indicate disbelief, but I fell "näe" is more common as an exclamation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidstenbeck

Wow is commonly used, though "Oj" which is "Oh" is commonly used in a similar sense to how wow is used by itself when something meant to sound like you are impressed but more surprised and maybe more passively impressed depending on how you vocalise the Oj.

Oj (short) = Oops / Oh (surprise) / Woah (surprise)

Oj(jj) (longer drawn out descending j) = Oh (concerned) / Oh my etc.

Oj(jjji) (longer ascending, often with nodding) = Wow, Impressive (Swedes just like to cloak being blatantly appriciative in other wording =))

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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On a related note, you should totally do a bonus lesson on snel hest. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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I recently read a blog post that suggested some Swedish versions for older people:

HMS (Herre Min Skapare)
DPT (Dra På Trissor)
NGSPTL (Nu Går Skam På Torra Land)
KIK (Kors I Krösamoset)
HJ (Herre Jistanes)
SMFK (Slår Mig För Knäna)
DMB (Dra Mig Baklänges)
IMFT (Instämmer Med Föregående Talare)

link to the blog: http://www.ulrikagood.com/2011/02/akronymer-for-den-mogne.html (more fun expressions in the comments)

All the Swedish expressions on the list are things that would mainly be used by … eh, let's say mature people.

PS just to be clear, that blog post was a joke and no one uses those abbreviations. (I think/hope… )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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omg. I need to memorize all of these and use them as often as possible.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Smfk would be a lovely Swedish version of rofl :).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidstenbeck

As a swede I've never heard any of these and noone would understand you haha

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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Oh my god, I love "vad ql" and "vi cs" hahahah.

The Swedes I know don't seem to buy into Swedish-language internet abbreviations (just English ones). The most common abbreviation I probably see is "pga" for "på grund av" which I'm pretty sure is an acceptable abbreviation in formal text also(?)

However, "dom" instead of de/dem is common (which is then less about abbreviating and more about letting readers know that you're typing in a casual informal register), and "det" can be "d" and "är" can be "e" but that seems less common (probably because "dom" looks intentional" while "d e" looks hurried)

Another thing that I've found super common when chatting in Swedish is omitting the personal pronoun "jag" if it is the first word in a sentence (and if it is implied from the context).

But I'm speaking from a 2016 perspective. Autocorrect means that less people abbreviate. But I bet Swedish beeper chatting in the early 90s was WILD.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Whether any kind of abbreviation is okay for formal text is a matter of debate, but p.g.a. would certainly be one of the classicals, and generally accepted. I agree completely with your assessments, and yes, the 90s text message limit led to very interesting abbreviating. :) Also, I'm pretty sure each year's 14-year-olds change the current set of teen text slang quite a bit.

My brother's ex, Lotta, used to sign her texts to him: "Puss, Lotta". However, she was an avid T9 typer and the old Nokias weren't really programmed for speed, so she frequently pressed send before the entire word had been recognised, and the last letter was omitted to spell "Puss, Kött" instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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Oh! I forgot one of the most common internet abbreviations of them all:

  • tsm = tack så mycket
  • vsg = varsågod

Will add more to this list if I remember.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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Tsm! Bor du på sverige?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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vsg~ bor inte i sverige men jag har många vänner i sthlm och gbg ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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Ah!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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As Joel said, tsm often means 'tillsammans' – together.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Synthpopalooza
Synthpopalooza
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One or two that I have seen ... "mej/sej/dej" instead of "mig/sig/dig" ... and "oxå" instead of "också".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fran.arrieta

Hahah I never understood what the point is with mej, sej and dej, considering you have to type the same amount of letters as if you spell it right!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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It's not that weird... people want to spell common words the way they pronounce them.

2 years ago